Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am aware that there are other questions on SO about changing alternating row colors. That's easy and it's not what I want to do.

I want to draw custom alternating-colored rows in a view-based NSTableView that look like those from iTunes 11 (slight bezel at the top and bottom of the row, as shown in this screenshot):

iTunes 11 screenshot

NOTE:

I know I can subclass NSTableRowView and do my custom drawing there. However, this is NOT an acceptable answer because the custom row will only be used for rows that have data in the table. In other words, if the table has only 5 rows, those 5 rows will use my custom NSTableRowView class but the remaining "rows" in the rest of the table (which are empty) will use the standard alternating colors. In that case, the first 5 rows will show the bezel and the remaining ones won't. Not good.

So, how can I hack NSTableView to draw these styled alternating rows for both filled and empty rows?

share|improve this question
2  
Tempted to close this as a dupe of indragie's question, simply because his solution should indirectly solve your question. –  CodaFi Jan 6 '13 at 6:43
2  
I saw that post before I wrote mine. The trouble is that he wants to use solid colors for the alternating rows, which is easy. I want to do custom drawing for the alternating rows, which is an entirely different problem. I can't use his approach because I need to draw the bezels; not just fill rows with alternating NSColors. –  Bryan Jan 6 '13 at 19:37
1  
The tricks used in that question involve picking colors and filling rects (and more importantly, finding the right method override to do it in). But once you're in a place where you can draw a filled rect, what's preventing you from drawing a white line across the top of that rect and a gray line across the bottom? –  rickster Jan 6 '13 at 21:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

That "slight bezel", as you put it, can actually be easily done with a little cheating on our part. Because, if you look closely, the top of every cell is a slightly lighter blue color than the dark alternating row, and the bottom of every cell is a dark grayish color, you can subclass NSTableView, then override - (void)drawRow:(NSInteger)row clipRect:(NSRect)clipRect:

- (void)drawRow:(NSInteger)row clipRect:(NSRect)clipRect
{
    //Use the drawing code from http://stackoverflow.com/a/5101923/945847, but change the colors to
    //look like iTunes's alternating rows.
    NSRect cellBounds = [self rectOfRow:row];
    NSColor *color = (row % 2) ? [NSColor colorWithCalibratedWhite:0.975 alpha:1.000] : [NSColor colorWithCalibratedRed:0.932 green:0.946 blue:0.960 alpha:1.000];
    [color setFill];
    NSRectFill(cellBounds);

    /* Slightly dark gray color */
    [[NSColor colorWithCalibratedWhite:0.912 alpha:1.000] set];
    /* Get the current graphics context */
    CGContextRef currentContext = [[NSGraphicsContext currentContext]graphicsPort];
    /*Draw a one pixel line of the slightly lighter blue color */
    CGContextSetLineWidth(currentContext,1.0f);
    /* Start the line at the top of our cell*/
    CGContextMoveToPoint(currentContext,0.0f, NSMaxY(cellBounds));
    /* End the line at the edge of our tableview, for multi-columns, this will actually be overkill*/
    CGContextAddLineToPoint(currentContext,NSMaxX(cellBounds), NSMaxY(cellBounds));
    /* Use the context's current color to draw the line */
    CGContextStrokePath(currentContext);

    /* Slightly lighter blue color */
    [[NSColor colorWithCalibratedRed:0.961 green:0.970 blue:0.985 alpha:1.000] set];
    CGContextSetLineWidth(currentContext,1.0f);
    CGContextMoveToPoint(currentContext,0.0f,1.0f);
    CGContextAddLineToPoint(currentContext,NSMaxX(self.bounds), 1.0f);
    CGContextStrokePath(currentContext);

    [super drawRow:row clipRect:clipRect];
}

Which, when done in a quick little tableview, looks like this: Nice Bezeling!

But what to do about the top and bottom of the tableview? After all, they'll still be either an ugly white, or the default alternating rows color. Well, as Apple revealed (in a talk titled, interestingly enough View Based NSTableView, Basic To Advanced), you can override -(void)drawBackgroundInClipRect:(NSRect)clipRect and do a little math to draw the background of the tableview like extra rows. A quick implementation looks something like this:

-(void)drawBackgroundInClipRect:(NSRect)clipRect
{
    // The super class implementation obviously does something more
    // than just drawing the striped background, because
    // if you leave this out it looks funny
    [super drawBackgroundInClipRect:clipRect];

    CGFloat   yStart   = 0;
    NSInteger rowIndex = -1;

    if (clipRect.origin.y < 0) {
        while (yStart > NSMinY(clipRect)) {
            CGFloat yRowTop = yStart - self.rowHeight;

            NSRect rowFrame = NSMakeRect(0, yRowTop, clipRect.size.width, self.rowHeight);
            NSUInteger colorIndex = rowIndex % self.colors.count;
            NSColor *color = [self.colors objectAtIndex:colorIndex];
            [color set];
            NSRectFill(rowFrame);

            /* Slightly dark gray color */
            [[NSColor colorWithCalibratedWhite:0.912 alpha:1.000] set];
            /* Get the current graphics context */
            CGContextRef currentContext = [[NSGraphicsContext currentContext]graphicsPort];
            /*Draw a one pixel line of the slightly lighter blue color */
            CGContextSetLineWidth(currentContext,1.0f);
            /* Start the line at the top of our cell*/
            CGContextMoveToPoint(currentContext,0.0f, yRowTop + self.rowHeight - 1);
            /* End the line at the edge of our tableview, for multi-columns, this will actually be overkill*/
            CGContextAddLineToPoint(currentContext,NSMaxX(clipRect), yRowTop + self.rowHeight - 1);
            /* Use the context's current color to draw the line */
            CGContextStrokePath(currentContext);

            /* Slightly lighter blue color */
            [[NSColor colorWithCalibratedRed:0.961 green:0.970 blue:0.985 alpha:1.000] set];
            CGContextSetLineWidth(currentContext,1.0f);
            CGContextMoveToPoint(currentContext,0.0f,yRowTop);
            CGContextAddLineToPoint(currentContext,NSMaxX(clipRect), yRowTop);
            CGContextStrokePath(currentContext);

            yStart -= self.rowHeight;
            rowIndex--;
        }
    }
}

But then, this leaves the bottom of the tableview that same ugly blank white color! So, we have to also override -(void)drawGridInClipRect:(NSRect)clipRect. Yet another quick implementation looks like this:

-(void)drawGridInClipRect:(NSRect)clipRect {
    [super drawGridInClipRect:clipRect];

    NSUInteger numberOfRows = self.numberOfRows;
    CGFloat yStart = 0;
    if (numberOfRows > 0) {
        yStart = NSMaxY([self rectOfRow:numberOfRows - 1]);
    }
    NSInteger rowIndex = numberOfRows + 1;

    while (yStart < NSMaxY(clipRect)) {
        CGFloat yRowTop = yStart - self.rowHeight;

        NSRect rowFrame = NSMakeRect(0, yRowTop, clipRect.size.width, self.rowHeight);
        NSUInteger colorIndex = rowIndex % self.colors.count;
        NSColor *color = [self.colors objectAtIndex:colorIndex];
        [color set];
        NSRectFill(rowFrame);

        /* Slightly dark gray color */
        [[NSColor colorWithCalibratedWhite:0.912 alpha:1.000] set];
        /* Get the current graphics context */
        CGContextRef currentContext = [[NSGraphicsContext currentContext]graphicsPort];
        /*Draw a one pixel line of the slightly lighter blue color */
        CGContextSetLineWidth(currentContext,1.0f);
        /* Start the line at the top of our cell*/
        CGContextMoveToPoint(currentContext,0.0f, yRowTop - self.rowHeight);
        /* End the line at the edge of our tableview, for multi-columns, this will actually be overkill*/
        CGContextAddLineToPoint(currentContext,NSMaxX(clipRect), yRowTop - self.rowHeight);
        /* Use the context's current color to draw the line */
        CGContextStrokePath(currentContext);

        /* Slightly lighter blue color */
        [[NSColor colorWithCalibratedRed:0.961 green:0.970 blue:0.985 alpha:1.000] set];
        CGContextSetLineWidth(currentContext,1.0f);
        CGContextMoveToPoint(currentContext,0.0f,yRowTop);
        CGContextAddLineToPoint(currentContext,NSMaxX(self.bounds), yRowTop);
        CGContextStrokePath(currentContext);

        yStart += self.rowHeight;
        rowIndex++;
    }
}

When all is said and done, we get nice little fake tableview cell rows on the top and bottom of our clipview that looks a little like this:

enter image description here

The full subclass can be found here.

share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant! Thanks for the detailed reply! –  Bryan Jan 7 '13 at 1:45
    
Well, after trying it out, this is close. However, when the tableView in question is an NSOutlineView, the drawing gets all screwed up when expanding/collapsing items in the tree. That's obviously got to do with manipulating the clipRects. I'll keep at it and see if I can tweak things to solve that issue. –  Bryan Jan 7 '13 at 2:16
    
You didn't specify that. I'd have to redo the drawing code for an outline view. TableView or nothing, basically. –  CodaFi Jan 7 '13 at 4:05
1  
@Bryan - did you ever do the gist? I'd really like to see it. –  machomeautoguy Jul 26 '13 at 23:24
1  

you can use

- (void)setUsesAlternatingRowBackgroundColors:(BOOL)useAlternatingRowColors

with useAlternatingRowColors YES to specify standard alternating row colors for the background, NO to specify a solid color.

share|improve this answer
    
This answer has absolutely nothing to do with the original question. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul. –  Bryan Jan 21 at 20:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.