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I am using an sqlite database to store results in an embedded C++ application.

I have a few single-column tables which I call "domain" tables, where columns in other tables reference them as foreign keys. These are essentially enumerated-type tables which are only changed once upon initialization. For example, one table that stores the status data type:

CREATE TABLE status_domain (status TEXT PRIMARY KEY NOT NULL UNIQUE);
INSERT INTO status_domain VALUES ('pending');
INSERT INTO status_domain VALUES ('in_progress');
INSERT INTO status_domain VALUES ('error');
INSERT INTO status_domain VALUES ('complete');  
.
.
CREATE TABLE my_other_table (
    .
    .
    status  TEXT NOT NULL,     
    .
    .
    FOREIGN KEY (status) REFERENCES status_domain(status)
);

The purpose of the domain table is to make use of sqlite's foreign key constraints (referential integrity).

The C++ code that writes to these tables has no awareness of the schema. I am wondering if it would be bad design to duplicate these tables in C++. For example:

enum StatusEnum { pending, in_progress, error, complete };

I see four options:

  1. Insert into my_other_table without knowing whether the status values I am inserting is valid. This will fail at runtime if the status value is invalid.
  2. Duplicate the status_domain with a C++ enum so that the compiler will not let me perform an insert with an invalid status. This violates the DRY principle since I will have to make changes in both places if the schema changes.
  3. Scrap the status_domain table and have the C++ enum enforce valid data type. The C++ code will be the only place inserting into these tables, so this seems reasonable. However it is nice to have the status type explicitly declared in the schema.
  4. Make the sqlite wrapper code more database/schema aware. I don't think this is worth the effort.

I am leaning toward option 2, but am hesitant because it's storing something that might change in two different places.

Note: There are a few more (longer) tables like this that I am not sharing.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It seems you want to go after option 2 then. I'm kind of assuming that the reason lies in the tables you can't share. In that case I'd go with GNU autogen and do something like:

status.def

autogen definitions status;

status = { num="1"; name="pending"; };
status = { num="2"; name="in_progress"; };
status = { num="3"; name="error"; };
status = { num="4"; name="complete"; };

gen.tpl

[+ autogen5 template 
sql=%s.sql
h=%s.h
(setenv "SHELL" "/bin/sh") +][+ CASE (suffix) +][+ == sql +]
CREATE TABLE status_domain (id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, status TEXT NOT NULL UNIQUE);
[+ FOR status "\n" +]INSERT INTO status_domain VALUES ([+num+], '[+name+]');[+
ENDFOR+]
CREATE TABLE my_other_table (
     .
     .
    status_domain_id  INTEGER,     
     .
     .
    FOREIGN KEY (status_domain_id) REFERENCES status_domain(id)
);
[+ == h +]enum StatusDomainEnum {
[+ FOR status ",\n" +]    [+name+] = [+num+][+ENDFOR+]
};
[+ESAC+]

Which outputs:

status.h

enum StatusDomainEnum {
    pending = 1,
    in_progress = 2,
    error = 3,
    complete = 4
};

and

status.sql

CREATE TABLE status_domain (id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, status TEXT NOT NULL UNIQUE);
INSERT INTO status_domain VALUES (1, 'pending');
INSERT INTO status_domain VALUES (2, 'in_progress');
INSERT INTO status_domain VALUES (3, 'error');
INSERT INTO status_domain VALUES (4, 'complete');
CREATE TABLE my_other_table (
    .
    .
    status_domain_id  INTEGER,     
    .
    .
    FOREIGN KEY (status_domain_id) REFERENCES status_domain(id)
);
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You are speaking about well known problem of maintaining consistency between database schema and procedural language code. This problem does not have good solution. There are several approaches like EntityFramework by Microsoft. None of them are perfect.

I would recommend you to consider the following solutions:

  1. Write a piece of C++ code that will generate an SQL query out of your enum (There is not reflection in C++, but there is an option that checks that all enum members are present in the switch statement). Once you change your enum, you should recreate your SQL query that should rebuild your table and run this query.

  2. Write SQL query that will generate piece of C++ code with enums out of the new state of your tables. Once you change your table, you will have to rerun your query and after that recompile your C++ code.

These procedures are not fully automatic, but at least they give some policy that can be followed.

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With what you've shown, I'd lean toward option 3 (scrap status_domain). Referentially, I don't see what that table really gives you (there's no associated data that you don't already have in my_other_table that you'd need for a join or other operation).

In my_other_table you can always do:

status TEXT NOT NULL CHECK (status IN ('pending', 'in_progress', ...))

There's also really no need to use strings for this purpose. The C++ enum value should work fine, and can also be checked by the CHECK constraint.

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I guess the CHECK is better than having the additional table, but it still doesn't get rid of the duplication problem, which is something that I might have to live with. –  izak Jan 7 '13 at 3:00

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