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I want change fileformat of all the files.

So I open them use vim *.

Then I want to know if there is any simple way to do this, rather than typing :set fileformat=unix and :wfor each file one by one.

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maybe you can use dos2unix for ALL your file in shell first –  How Chen Jan 6 '13 at 3:37
    
@HowChen: thank you for providing this command. But I also want to do how to do same operation to all opened files in vim. –  pktangyue Jan 6 '13 at 3:46
    
Why do you want to do it via vim? Why is that better than doing it in the shell with dos2unix? –  Andy Lester Jan 6 '13 at 4:06
    
@AndyLester: I have done that with dos2unix. And I think I may need to do same operation to many files in vim in other cases. –  pktangyue Jan 6 '13 at 4:20
    
@pktangyue: You should not need to convert line endings in vim if you have already done it with dos2unix. Why do you think you need to do it in vim? –  Andy Lester Jan 6 '13 at 4:29
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Maybe you need bufdo?

 :help bufdo
 bufdo[!] {cmd}     Execute {cmd} in each buffer in the buffer list.
 It works like doing this: 
                :bfirst
                :{cmd}
                :bnext
                :{cmd}
                etc.
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Thank you. And I find other similar commands, like :windo :tabo :argdo. –  pktangyue Jan 6 '13 at 7:32
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argdo is what you want, not bufdo, since you want to do it on every argument and you don't (necessarily) want to open every file first.

:argdo set ff=unix | update

should do the trick.

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Sure, you can do this using vim record and play feature. Follow these steps

1. Open all files using vim *
2. Press "qq" to start recording
3. :set ff=unix
4. :wn
5. Press again "q" to stop recording
6. Execute like "100@q"

Here 100 is the approximate number of files, but don't worry if you gave more number also. It'll stop when it finishes all buffer saying "E165: Cannot go beyond last file". You can get the number of file is by doing "ls | wc -l" before you open.

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