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EDITED: Reconstructed the sample code to include a more relevant set of objects.

I have an interesting situation that I'm having trouble finding a solution for. I have an abstract class with an abstract function that uses generics (see example code below). In an inheriting class, I'm trying to overload the function, but I'm getting

Error CS0030: Cannot convert type 'Sample.Thingy' to 'T' (CS0030)

Naturally, this isn't my real code, but this code produces the same result as what I'm getting. If I try casting the return value to (T), I get a similar error. If I try adding where T : BaseThingy or where T : Thingy, then I get

Error CS0460: 'Sample.Container.GetThingy(Guid)': Cannot specify constraints for overrides and explicit interface implementation methods (CS0460)

namespace Sample {
    // The abstract base class for thingies
    public abstract class BaseThingy {
        private Guid m_ID;
        private String m_Name;

        public BaseThingy( ) {
            m_ID = Guid.NewGuid( );
        }

        public BaseThingy( Guid id ) {
            m_ID = id;
        }

        public Guid ID {
            get {
                return m_ID;
            }
        }

        public String Name {
            get {
                return m_Name;
            }
            set {
                m_Name = value;
            }
        }
    }

    // The abstract base class for containers
    public abstract class BaseContainer {
        public abstract T GetThingy<T>(Guid id) where T : BaseThingy;
    }

    // Inherits from BaseThingy
    public class RedThingy : BaseThingy {
        private DateTime m_Created;

        public RedThingy( ) : base( ) {
            m_Created = DateTime.Now;
        }

        public RedThingy( Guid id ) : base( id ) {
            m_Created = DateTime.Now;
        }

        public DateTime Created {
            get {
                return m_Created;
            }
        }
    }

    // Inherits from BaseThingy
    public class BlueThingy : BaseThingy {
        public BlueThingy( ) : base( ) {
        }

        public BlueThingy( Guid id ) : base( id ) {
        }
    }

    // Inherits from BaseContainer
    public class Container : BaseContainer {
        private System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary<Guid, RedThingy> m_RedThingies;
        private System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary<Guid, BlueThingy> m_BlueThingies;

        public Container( ) {
            m_Thingies = new System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary<Guid, BaseThingy>();
        }

        public override T GetThingy<T>( Guid id ) where T : BaseThingy {
            if( typeof( T ) == typeof( RedThingy ) {
                if( m_RedThingies.ContainsKey( id ) ) {
                    return m_RedThingies[ id ];
                } else {
                    return null;
                }
            } else if( typeof( T ) == typeof( BlueThingy ) ) {
                if( m_BlueThingies.ContainsKey( id ) ) {
                    return m_BlueThingies[ id ];
                } else {
                    return null;
                }
            } else {
                return null;
            }
        }

        public void AddThing( RedThingy item ) {
            if( item != null && !m_RedThingies.ContainsKey( item.ID ) ) {
                m_RedThingies.Add( item.ID, item );
            }
        }

        public void AddThing( BlueThingy item ) {
            if( item != null && !m_BlueThingies.ContainsKey( item.ID ) ) {
                m_BlueThingies.Add( item.ID, item );
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Alright, after reading through the answers, I believe I have a solution. I was thinking this was a compiler limitation, but I guess it has more to do with too much code and not enough caffeine input. Thanks all (Eve, especially) for your input. My solution is to change this: public abstract T GetThingy<T>( Guid id ); to this: public BaseThingy GetThingy<T>( Guid id ); Thanks again, everyone! –  Jason Satterfield Jan 6 '13 at 6:57
    
It depends on what you need from that method. If you are ok with just BaseThingy, good! –  ivowiblo Jan 6 '13 at 7:48
    
Originally, I wanted the return type to match the generic type T, but there is a compiler limitation that prevents that from happening using the design pattern I have. If you have an alternative suggestion that doesn't involve a major overhaul of the design pattern, I may consider it. My actual project is composed of 4 projects containing over 100,000 lines of code in just over 120 classes, most of which inherit from one of three base class types. –  Jason Satterfield Jan 6 '13 at 18:32
    
But there's no compiler limitation. The language provides a way of doing what you wanted in the first place. –  ivowiblo Jan 7 '13 at 3:08
    
Please elaborate. The signature public abstract T GetThingy<T>( Guid id ) where T : BaseThingy; seems the most intuitive to me, but the compiler doesn't seem to like it when I return any types that inherit from BaseThingy. And trying to specify the same constraint on the overridden method throws a different exception. What am I missing? –  Jason Satterfield Jan 7 '13 at 20:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The answer is that the type you pass has to inherit from BaseThingy but it doesn't imply that you can cast a Thingy to it. Let me make an example to simplify it:

abstract class BaseThingy
{
}

class Thingy1 : BaseThingy
{
    public void DoSomething()
    {
    }
}

class Thingy2 : BaseThingy
{
    public void DoSomethingElse()
    {
    }
}

class Foo
{
    static T GetItem<T>() where T : BaseThingy
    {
        //Won't compile, Thingy1, while deriving from BaseThingy
        //Could not be the same type of T, derive from it or have
        //An implicit cast operator to T.
        return new Thingy1();
    }

    static void Bar()
    {
        var result = GetItem<Thingy2>();
        //But your method is returning a Thingy1,
        //which doesn't have the following method
        result.DoSomethingElse();
    }
}

Bar() will expect result to be of type Thingy2 but GetItem is trying to return a Thingy1.

share|improve this answer
    
In my original code, I have one base class, which is inherited by 3 other classes. Each of those three class are inherited by numerous other classes. I also have a "container" base that contains a definition of public abstract T LoadItem<T>(...) where T : BaseItem (which is overridden in other "container" classes. –  Jason Satterfield Jan 6 '13 at 6:25
    
Let's throw another class into my original example. Say there are 4 different Thingy classes, each inheriting from BaseThingy. The GetThingy<T> function would return the Thingy object that matches the type specified by T. If I'm returning the super class, as long as it inherits from the base class, why does this throw an exception? –  Jason Satterfield Jan 6 '13 at 6:29
    
@JasonSatterfield I don't understand what your comment implies. My answer states that you pass the expected return type to your method and in its body you're trying to return a type which doesn't necessarily derive or can be implicitly cast to your type. –  Mir Jan 6 '13 at 6:30
    
@JasonSatterfield I've edited my example, I hope it's clearer now. –  Mir Jan 6 '13 at 6:33
    
Actually, the type that gets returned does derive from the type that gets passed into the function. The BaseContainer class specifies that the type MUST derive from BaseThingy by using the "where T : BaseThingy` clause at the end of the function signature. I can't specify another where clause, because it's an overridden function. I also can't return a type that does derive from BaseThingy because it says I can't convert RedThingy to type T (even though T inherits from BaseThingy, and RedThingy inherits from BaseThingy). –  Jason Satterfield Jan 6 '13 at 6:52

The problem is that as you already set the constraints in the base class you don't need to specify them again in the derived classes. That's why it gives that error.

Besides it produces this error, I don't get what is the problem you have. Just don't specify the constraints in the inherited classes.

In order to solve the conversion problem, you have to cast it:

public T Get<T>() where T : Thingy
{
    RedThingy thingy = GetRedThingy();
    return (T)thingy;
}

In case the compiler doesn't let you do that (I don't have Visual Studio open now) you can cast it first to object and then to T (This is a workaround that does the job).

public T Get<T>() where T : Thingy
{
    RedThingy thingy = GetRedThingy();
    return (T)((object)thingy);
}

Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you have to specify them in the base. I'm pretty sure it will tell you that it inherits the constraints from the base class whether you specified them there or not. –  Brandon Moore Jan 6 '13 at 6:26
    
Exactly. Just in the base and nowhere else. –  ivowiblo Jan 6 '13 at 6:36
    
Oh I see what you meant now; I thought you were suggesting he specify them in the derived class instead of in the base class. Of course, that still leaves the problem he's having which is that he designed his solution on the assumption that he could cast the result to a more derived implementation than the constraint calls for. –  Brandon Moore Jan 6 '13 at 6:40
    
Oh, now I see the edit in the question. –  ivowiblo Jan 6 '13 at 7:41
1  
+1 This provides a correct solution while maintaining the strong-typing for the return value. –  jam40jeff Jan 6 '13 at 20:46

The quickest fix would be to change your base implementation constraint to be a Thingy instead of a BaseThingy. If that doesn't make sense for your application, then it's highly likely that you're just not using the best design pattern to solve your problem. In the latter case, if could explain a little more about your problem at a high level then I'm sure we could give you some other suggestions on how to approach it.

share|improve this answer
    
And by 'highly likely' I mean definitely ;) –  Brandon Moore Jan 6 '13 at 6:30

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