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This is just a simple question, but one that I am unable to find an answer for. In MVC should all of the classes in the application extend one core class? This would basically allow for global methods and properties. I was worried because if you are extending a main object it would have to be very very broad with each new class becoming more and more specific as it shifts down the inheritance tree. If I do do it this way, does it matter that I have to load such a large number of dependencies? Also, what are the pros/cons of this method?

Page
    static variable $number
    Model extends page
        database_connection extends Model
    Class1 extends page
        Class1Action extends Class1
    Class2 extends page
    Classes extends page
        errorLogger extends Classes
             formErrorLogger extends errorLogger

Another question I have is how do I access static variables from a any parent? I know you can do self::thing and parent::thing but how would forErrorLogger access $number. Or can't it? I understand inheriting a static method / property can have issues some times.

My idea is purely based on how I have interpreted the MVC idea.

I am building the MVC framework just so I can solidify my understanding of php and the programming paradigms behind it. Please do not vote me down just because you think that it is a dumb question or I am wrong. I am trying to learn so please explain.

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closed as not constructive by tereško, NullPoiиteя, shiplu.mokadd.im, cryptic ツ, j0k Jan 6 '13 at 11:53

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What is wrong with my question? –  Sam Jan 6 '13 at 10:14
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In writing your own MVC, you can do whatever you would like. A lot of MVC frameworks have a model and controller class that gets extended, and those may each extend a single class. Again, it is however you want to do it. You can look at several of the popular ones and see what they have done just in looking at the documentation (CodeIgniter, Cake, Yii, Symphony, Zend, etc etc)

There is going to be a lot of preloading if you are writing a huge inheritance tree and plugins like Routing, Auth, Active Record, Templating, etc, but overall there really shouldn't be much of an issue with server memory unless you plan on getting thousands of hits constantly. You can use the spl_autoloader class to register namespaces and such to improve loading and memory usage, only loading those objects you plan on using.

Accessing a static variable is just class_name::$variable. From within the class you can do class_name::$variable or self::$variable. You can call parent::$variable as well if needed. You cannot call child::$variable though. You can always reference the child class by name and that should work, but that throws off the concept of inheritance a little.

And for my final thought, writing an MVC is great practice and helps solidify the concept of MVC in your mind. Its great preparation for learning a true MVC framework. Putting your own MVC framework into production may be a bit risky though. The reason I say this is simply because you may be an amazing programmer, but you can make a mistake. Without several sets of eyes reviewing your code daily, you could have easily overlooked a vulnerability. Using a tried and tested framework has hundreds of active users and contributors that update the code, fix bugs, and make the code clean/precise.

Also when it comes to a personal project, again, MVC is great, but for a job, it is a horrible idea. If you leave the job and another programmer comes in, you just cost that programmer a few dozen hours trying to figure out what you wrote, as I am assuming you are not commenting and documenting along the way.

Finally, production frameworks have most of your useful plugins all ready to go (Active Record, Cache, Validations, Routing, Auth, etc). You will have to code these all your self, so why re-invent the wheel. Again, try it out and when you grasp the concept making a small app, try switching to a production framework and learning their way of doing things. Eventually you will find one that fits your frame of mind and needs. Good luck.

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Thanks Tim. Excellent answer. I do try to comment as good as possible when I am programming the framework, more for my own understanding than anyone elses. –  Sam Jan 6 '13 at 7:23
    
I wonder, could you name one such "true MVC framework" of which you speak? Also, why exactly using a well written framework at workplace would be bad? If it is well written, then it will be easy to maintain. And just because you wrote the code, does not mean that in 4-6 month you are able to understand it. As for the "powerful features" .. emm .. how exactly the violation of SRP that is active record pattern can be defended in a production code?! It is a pattern for prototyping, not for anything that you would have to maintain. –  tereško Jan 6 '13 at 16:56
    
I see what you are saying. But seriously, 1 person using their own code is much more open to vulnerabilities. Using a production framework would has less vulnerabilities and be patched often. Why risk your own code that has only been tested and checked by yourself when there are other options available that are checked by hundreds, thousands of others. For security alone a production framework is better. –  Tim Withers Jan 6 '13 at 19:10
    
Also, @tereško, like I said, why re-invent the wheel. If you are bringing something new to the table, then by all means, write your own MVC. If you are merely shadowing what others have done, use their work, incorporate it into your own. It will save hours of time and trouble. Again, unless there is something new or innovative, really, why re-invent the wheel? If it is for learning purposes or you have a new way to handle data, I totally understand that and urge you to do it. –  Tim Withers Jan 6 '13 at 19:14
    
Finally, I am not endorsing any specific framework or method. I don't fully understand what OP is trying to do. A simple routing framework may do the job, or possibly a HMVC framework is needed for what he is trying to accomplish. Again, it doesn't matter what he chooses to do. I speak from experience when I say, it was a great learning tool. I spent dozens of hours working on my own framework. I learned the concepts I enjoyed, and it eventually led me to a production framework that employed many of those same concepts. I now only have to worry about upkeeping my own plugins. –  Tim Withers Jan 6 '13 at 19:18
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This is just a simple question, but one that I am unable to find an answer for. In MVC should all of the classes in the application extend one core class?

No.

This would basically allow for global methods and properties.

Global state is a bad practice to begin with.

I was worried because if you are extending a main object it would have to be very very broad with each new class becoming more and more specific as it shifts down the inheritance tree.

Which is why you should favor composition over inheritance.

If I do do it this way, does it matter that I have to load such a large number of dependencies?

Yes, it matters. It signifies, that you have a class which has too many responsibilities.

Also, what are the pros/cons of this method?

There are no "pros". It is bad practice across the board.

Another question I have is how do I access static variables from a any parent?

You can do it in php 5.3 using late static binding. But you shouldn't. Static variable a just another form of global state.

I know you can do self::thing and parent::thing but how would forErrorLogger access $number. Or can't it?

Wat !?

I understand inheriting a static method / property can have issues some times.

Not "some times". They have issues "all the time".

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Thanks for the reply. Do you not like the idea of using the static keyword? –  Sam Jan 6 '13 at 10:09
    
Do you have anywhere I can look at your code? I would like to see how you program in php. –  Sam Jan 6 '13 at 10:22
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