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Method to check if a pkg name is already inside another list thats populated with structures:

For example: test_pkg_list[] would contain something along the following:

test_pkg_list[0]: 

name = git
version = 1.0
description = git package

test_pkg_list[1]:

name = opengl
version = 1.25
description = graphics

So on...

So my goal was to check the list for any duplicates of names.

def _pkg_exists_in_list(self, list, pkg_name):
        if len(list) >= 1:
            if any(pkg_name in item for item in list):
                return True 
            else:
                return False
        else:
            return False

I pass in two parameters:

test_pkg_list = [] #Note that this list does populate over time, at first its empty.
pkg_name = 'git'

#Call the method an pass the paramters
if self._pkg_exists_in_list(test_pkg_list, pkg_name) is False:
  #No duplicates found continue
else:
  #We found duplicate, stop.

I continue to receive the following exception error:

argument of type 'instance' is not iterable
share|improve this question
    
Could you show the traceback? –  David Robinson Jan 6 '13 at 7:30
2  
You really shouldn't have an argument with name list; that can cause problems by overwriting the list built-in. –  jdotjdot Jan 6 '13 at 7:32
    
This depends entirely on what test_pkg_list is populated with (which you never provide a hint to), since it is pkg_name in item that raises the exception, not for item in list. (We know this because if it were an non-iterable instance, then len(list) in the previous line would raise the error). –  David Robinson Jan 6 '13 at 7:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your code is way more complex than it needs to be.

def _pkg_exists_in_list(self, the_list, pkg_name):
    return pkg_name in the_list

Here's why:

def _pkg_exists_in_list(self, list, pkg_name):  # don't call it list; don't overwrite built-ins
        if len(list) >= 1:   # Unnecessary; [] resolves Boolean to False
            if any(pkg_name in item for item in list): # can just check if an item is in a list using the `in` statement; no need to match every string to every string
                return True # Can just return the evaluation of an expression; poor form to explicitly return True/False after if statement
            else:
                return False
    else:
        return False

Update:

I guess I should point out as said in the comments that item in mylist is not identical to your code any(mystring in item for item in mylist), but rather is equivalent, more verbosely, to any(mystring == item for item in mylist). However, I'm guessing that you actually meant == than substring matching with in.

Second update:

While I like Alex's idea of using a dictionary, it might not be necessary.

import re
def _pkg_exists_in_list(self, the_list, pkg_name):
    return any(re.search(r'name = ' + pkg_name, item) for item in the_list)

I guess it's just a question of which is more efficient.

Update 2.1:

I win.

C:\Users\JJ>python -m timeit -s "p = ['''name = git\nversion = 1.0\nd
escription = git package''', '''name = opengl\nversion = 1.25\ndescription = gra
phics''']; import re" "dictlist = []" "for item in p:" " d = {}" " for line in i
tem.splitlines():" "  k, v = line.split('=')" "  d[k.strip()] = v.strip()" " dic
tlist.append(d)" "any('git' == x['name'] for x in dictlist)"
100000 loops, best of 3: 5.38 usec per loop

C:\Users\JJ>python -m timeit -s "p = ['''name = git\nversion = 1.0\nd
escription = git package''', '''name = opengl\nversion = 1.25\ndescription = gra
phics''']; import re" "any(re.search(r'name = ' + 'git', item) for item in p)"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.36 usec per loop
share|improve this answer
    
No, that's not the same. obj in a_list = any(item == obj for item in a_list), but OP's code checks whether any(item in obj for item in a_list). –  delnan Jan 6 '13 at 7:44
    
@delnan, that is true, but I'm relatively confident that he actually meant item == obj. There was just a previous answer that pointed that out that was recently deleted, I guess. –  jdotjdot Jan 6 '13 at 7:45
    
There's a new-deleted answer, but it just makes the same assumption without any rationale. What makes you so confident? –  delnan Jan 6 '13 at 7:46
    
It was just a guess. The code in the OP was written pretty unpythonically, so I was guessing that OP isn't that familiar with Python, and mixing up in and == with substrings is not unheard of for Python beginners. Since that point you made was noted in a different answer, I didn't feel a need to restate it. In any case, I pointed out the difference in my answer. –  jdotjdot Jan 6 '13 at 7:48
    
I updated my question, the list i'm trying to pass in is not populated by simple strings, each index holds a structure that has a couple of properties that can be set. Basically the list holds 1578 structures that each have around 5 propeties to provide debian package information. –  Dayan Jan 6 '13 at 8:00

I would convert your list of strings to a list of dicts, then search using something like this:

test_pkg_list = [
"""name = git
version = 1.0
description = git package""",

"""name = opengl
version = 1.25
description = graphics"""]

dictlist = []

# Turn into a list of dictionaries
for item in test_pkg_list:
    d = {}
    for line in item.splitlines():
        k, v = line.split('=')
        d[k.strip()] = v.strip()
    dictlist.append(d)

print dictlist
# [
#    {'version': '1.0', 'name': 'git', 'description': 'git package'}, 
#    {'version': '1.25', 'name': 'opengl', 'description': 'graphics'}
# ]

searchname = 'git'

# Now search by name
print any(searchname == x['name'] for x in dictlist)

If you don't want the hassle of converting to dict, you could do something as simple as:

>>> searchname = 'git'
>>> print any(searchname in line for line in test_pkg_list)
True
>>> searchname = 'empty'
>>> print any(searchname in line for line in test_pkg_list)
False
>>> searchname = 'version' # This is a problem
>>> print any(searchname in line for line in test_pkg_list)
True

# Or to ensure it only matches the name:
>>> print any('name = ' + searchname in line for line in test_pkg_list)
False
>>> searchname = 'git'
>>> print any('name = ' + searchname in line for line in test_pkg_list)
True
>>> searchname = 'version'
>>> print any('name = ' + searchname in line for line in test_pkg_list)
False

Or you could extract just the names:

for line in test_pkg_list:
    firstline = line.splitlines()[0]
    name = firstline.split('=')[1].strip()
    print name

One line:

>>> names = [line.splitlines()[0].split('=')[1].strip() for line in test_pkg_list]
['git', 'opengl']

Then compare:

>>> 'git' in names
True
>>> 'test' in names
False

Performance is comparable to using re: (65% of the speed)

>>> timeit.timeit("any(re.search(r'name = ' + 'git', item) for item in p)", "p = ['''name = git\nversion = 1.0\ndescription = git package''', '''name = opengl\nversion = 1.25\ndescription = graphics''']; import re")
2.338025673656987

>>> timeit.timeit("'git' in [line.splitlines()[0].split('=')[1].strip() for line in p]", "p = ['''name = git\nversion = 1.0\ndescription = git package''', '''name = opengl\nversion = 1.25\ndescription = graphics''']")
3.5689878827767245
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