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Possible Duplicate:
Swapping objects using pointers

I know how to do swapping using pointers, but then, if I try a different approach like this:

/* Pointers */
#include <stdio.h>
int main ()
{
  int a=4,b=6;
  swap(&a,&b);
  printf("A is %d, and B is %d\n",a,b);
  return 0;
}

int swap(int *a, int *b)
{
  int *temp;
  temp = a;
  a = b;
  b = temp;
  return 0;
}

It doesn't work. Basically the swap function is changing the address, like 'a' now has the address of 'b', and vice-versa.. If I print out the values in swap function, it gives swapped values, but it is not reflected in main function. Can any one tell me why?

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marked as duplicate by Jens Gustedt, Paul R, Rohan, Blachshma, j0k Jan 6 '13 at 11:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Is it C or C++? I'd recommend two different things. – chris Jan 6 '13 at 7:54
    
    
No accepted answer! – UnderDog Jan 6 '13 at 7:55
3  
That's the fault of the original poster, it does not indicate the answers are wrong. – DCoder Jan 6 '13 at 7:55
    
The subject of the question is misleading since it says swapping pointer and the accepted solution is actually about swapping the content of those pointers. With this solution, both a and b still point to the same memory address. So, from my point of view you should rename the question to swap integers or what @JensGustedt proposed (duplicate) – OnaBai Jan 6 '13 at 10:03
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Because

the swap function is changing the address, like 'a' now has the address of 'b', and vice-versa

is not true. It doesn't change their addresses (that would make absolutely no sense whatsoever). The function changes the values of the pointers - those pointers are copies of the addresses, and these pointers, since they're function arguments, are local to the function. What you have to do is:

int swap(int *a, int *b)
{
    int temp;
    temp = *a;
    *a = *b;
    *b = temp;
    return 0;
}

Or you can use references (only in C++), like this:

int swap(int &a, int &b)
{
    int temp;
    temp = a;
    a = b;
    b = temp;
    return 0;
}

and call it without the addressof operator:

int a = 4, b = 6;
swap(a, b);

However, if this is for an actual implementation, and not a "write a swap function"-style homework, then you should use the std::swap() function from <algorithm>.

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2  
Also, std::swap. – chris Jan 6 '13 at 7:57
    
@chris Yep, I'm adding that one too. – user529758 Jan 6 '13 at 7:58
    
Okay.. make me understand one thing.. If I declare a pointer inside main function, and assign the address of any variable to that pointer, then also, that pointer will hold "just" the copy of the addres?? – UnderDog Jan 6 '13 at 8:05
    
@UnderDog, It's the same as any other variable. Say you assign a pointer to another pointer and then reassign the first to a new address. The second still has the old address stored. To get around that, you'd make the second a reference to a pointer, so that when the first changes to a new pointee, the second does as well. – chris Jan 6 '13 at 8:10

If you simply take them as inout using the standard method, you will receive a COPY of the variable, not the actual variable. However when you pass a *variable you give it a variable that points to the actual variable. You can then set the memory location using swap because a copy of a memory location is still the same.

So try this code for your function:

int swap(int *a, int *b)
{
  int tmp;
  tmp = *a;
  *a = *b;
  *b = tmp;
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The explanation I was looking for. Thanks! – UnderDog Jan 6 '13 at 8:31
    
@UnderDog No problem glad to help. Out of curiosity is this for a course? CS50? – user1943931 Jan 6 '13 at 8:32

'a' and 'b' in swap aren't the 'a' and 'b' in main. Within swap, these are pointers. If you want to swap the values pointed by a,b, you need:

int swap( int* pa, int *pb )
{
    int temp;
    temp = *pa;
    *pa = *pb;
    *pb = temp;
    return 0;
}

note I'm using more appropriate variable names. Also, you need to allocate temp (vs allocating pointer to temp).

share|improve this answer

You can try using:

int swap(int*& a, int*& b)
{
  int *temp;
  temp = a;
  a = b;
  b = temp;
  return 0;
}

Note that stack addresses cannot be moved so you'll need a different main:

int main ()
{
  int a=4,b=6;
  int *A = &a;
  int *B = &b;

  swap(A, B);
  printf("A is %d, and B is %d\n",*A, *B);
  return 0;
}
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