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In Linux kernel source code, there are many memory barrier(smp_mb() and so on).

But in redis's source,I didn't see it. In the Makefile of redis, gcc optimize option is -O2, so it should be reorder these instruction. Why it not use mb() for insure the correct behavior?

Added:

For example: In Linux kernel's kfifo:

unsigned int __kfifo_put(struct kfifo *fifo,unsigned char *buffer, unsigned int len)   
{   
  unsigned int l;   
  len = min(len, fifo->size - fifo->in + fifo->out);
  smp_mb();
  l = min(len, fifo->size - (fifo->in & (fifo->size - 1)));   
  memcpy(fifo->buffer + (fifo->in & (fifo->size - 1)), buffer, l);
  ...
  smp_wmb();
  fifo->in += len;
  ...
}

In Redis source, I research the whole project, cann't find memory barriers: for example:

zskiplistNode *zslInsert(zskiplist *zsl, double score, robj *obj) {
  zskiplistNode *update[ZSKIPLIST_MAXLEVEL], *x;
  unsigned int rank[ZSKIPLIST_MAXLEVEL];
  int i, level;
  ...
  level = zslRandomLevel();
  if (level > zsl->level) {
    for (i = zsl->level; i < level; i++) {
      rank[i] = 0;
      update[i] = zsl->header;
/////need a mb() ???
      update[i]->level[i].span = zsl->length;
    }
    zsl->level = level;
  }
  ...
}

is it special that why in redis there is no memory barriers?
I think it probably that my understand for mb() is immature, thanks for comment...

added:

But in above two pieces of code displayed, the kfifo in linux kernel uses mb(). it just changes variables allocated in thread's stack space and also user mb() between r/w operation. So it should not totally relevent to multi-threading... (although redis is single thread)

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2  
This question is too vague. To make it concrete, please show some Redis code that you think requires a memory barrier for correct operation, but doesn't use one. –  NPE Jan 6 '13 at 9:23
    
thanks, I re-edit it –  Pei WenQian Jan 6 '13 at 9:59
    
I know nothing about Redis's code base. Are there reasons to think that the skiplist implementation that you show is meant to be thread-aware, let along thread-safe? –  NPE Jan 6 '13 at 10:04
    
In Multi-Processing(SMP..),if open the optimization with gcc, it's may reorder instructions. so it may be CPU read/write the dirty data from store buffer,so need mb() for insure the correct behavior? (in my opinion) –  Pei WenQian Jan 6 '13 at 10:15
    
Well, if there's only a single thread looking at/changing the data, all of that is completely irrelevant. The compiler is not allowed to reorder instructions in a manner that would break single-threaded code. –  NPE Jan 6 '13 at 10:28
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Redis is single threaded, so there's no need for memory barriers.

They're only relevant if you have multiple execution paths (e.g. in a multithreaded application). Even with multithreaded user space applications, you would normally not need your own memory barriers, as libraries (e.g. pthreads) contains memory barriers in the synchronization APIs, (such as mutexes, semaphores, condition variables and so on).

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But in above two pieces of code displayed, the kfifo in linux kernel uses mb(). it just changes variables allocated in thread's stack space and also user mb() between r/w operation. So it should not totally relevent to multi-threading... –  Pei WenQian Jan 6 '13 at 17:36
1  
@Pei WenQian No it doesn't. It reads and writes from the passed in struct kfifo, a struct kfifo can be shared among several different tasks in the kernel, so that code needs to care about concurrent use of the fifo, in some cases you'll need additional locking for __kfifo_put though. –  nos Jan 6 '13 at 17:56
    
Oh!! yeah, i partial focus on len parameter, these mb() isn't used for synchronize len, aim at the struct kfifo. thanks a lot –  Pei WenQian Jan 6 '13 at 18:03
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It may be helpful to realize that very little code requires explicit memory barriers. Some examples of such code include OS kernels, threading libraries and lock-free data structures.

Most other code would either:

  1. not directly interact with threading, rendering memory barriers unnecessary;
  2. use OS-provided threading libraries (e.g. pthreads), and rely on the memory ordering guarantees provided by such libraries.

If, when asking this question, you had a specific part of Redis's code base in mind, please show us the relevant code.

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thanks for a lot, I re-edit it. It's my first time asking question on stackoverflow, Please excuse my negligence –  Pei WenQian Jan 6 '13 at 10:03
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