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I have a list of tuples similar to this:

l = [(1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6), (7, 8), (9, 0)]

I want to create a simple one-liner that will give me the following result:

r = (25, 20) or r = [25, 20] # don't care if tuple or list.

Which would be like doing the following:

r = [0, 0]
for t in l:
  r[0]+=t[0]
  r[1]+=t[1]

I am sure it is something very simple, but I can't think of it.

Note: I looked at similar questions already:

How do I sum the first value in a set of lists within a tuple?

How do I sum the first value in each tuple in a list of tuples in Python?

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possible duplicate of Python element-wise tuple operations like sum –  Ciro Santilli 11 mins ago

1 Answer 1

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Use zip() and sum():

In [1]: l = [(1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6), (7, 8), (9, 0)]

In [2]: [sum(x) for x in zip(*l)]
Out[2]: [25, 20]

or:

In [4]: map(sum, zip(*l))
Out[4]: [25, 20]

timeit results:

In [16]: l = [(1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6), (7, 8), (9, 0)]*1000

In [17]: %timeit [sum(x) for x in zip(*l)]
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.46 ms per loop

In [18]: %timeit [sum(x) for x in izip(*l)]       #prefer itertools.izip
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.28 ms per loop

In [19]: %timeit map(sum, zip(*l))
100 loops, best of 3: 1.48 ms per loop

In [20]: %timeit map(sum, izip(*l))                #prefer itertools.izip
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.29 ms per loop
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O_O can't believe how simple that was, how could I have forgot about zip? thanks. Which is more efficient? the map or list-comprehension method? –  Inbar Rose Jan 6 '13 at 9:34
    
@Inbar test and find out. –  Triptych Jan 6 '13 at 9:36
    
map sometimes outperforms list comprehension when used with built-in functions. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jan 6 '13 at 9:36
    
Out of interest, what does the asterisk mean when you go zip(*l)? –  nick_w Jan 10 '13 at 8:04
    
@nick_w for zip() when used with * acts like unzipping a list. docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#zip –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jan 10 '13 at 8:12

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