Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the regex for these cases:

29000.12345678900, expected result 29000.123456789

29000.000, expected result 29000

29000.00003400, expected result 29000.000034

In short, I want to eliminate the 0 point if there is no 1-9 found again behind decimal and I also want to eliminate the dot (.) if actually the number can be considered as integer.

I use this regex

(?:.0*$|0*$)

but it gives me this result:

29123.6 from 29123.6400, 4 is gone from there.

When I tested the regex separately, it works perfectly,

.0*$ gives me 29123 from 29123.0000

0*$ gives me 29123.6423 from 29123.642300

Am I missing something with the combined regex?

share|improve this question
1  
Escape the dot, it is a special character. –  Asad Jan 6 '13 at 9:51
2  
Why not use .rstrip('0') or something similar? –  Blender Jan 6 '13 at 9:53
1  
it is necessary to add language tag for regex based questions.. –  Anirudha Jan 6 '13 at 10:06
    
I use Objective-C as my language –  Rendy Jan 6 '13 at 10:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you think regex is the best way of doing it, you can just use something like this:

\.?0+$

It works for both cases:

> '12300000.000001130000000'.replace(/\.?0+$/g, '')
"12300000.00000113"
> '12300000.000000000000'.replace(/\.?0+$/g, '')
"12300000"
share|improve this answer
    
-1 This replaces the zeros in 3000, leaving 3. –  Asad Jan 6 '13 at 10:05
    
@Asad: To me, it looked like the only inputs are floats. –  Blender Jan 6 '13 at 10:11
    
Yes, the cases are only for float number and I still face the same case with my regex for your regex "29123.6 from 29123.6400, 4 is gone from there." :( –  Rendy Jan 6 '13 at 10:22
    
I forgot to escape the backslash and now it works! Thanks! –  Rendy Jan 6 '13 at 11:35
    
btw, I just checked, it also truncates the 00 for integer..for example, from 100 to 1 :( –  Rendy Jan 7 '13 at 4:42

You can use this regex

^\d+(\.\d*[1-9])?
-   -------------
|        |->this would match only if the digits after . end with [1-9] 
|
|->^ depicts the start of the string..it is necessary to match the pattern

that solves your problem

try it here

share|improve this answer
    
This is the correct answer. –  Asad Jan 6 '13 at 10:11
    
I modified my regex to become: (?:.0*$|^\d+(\.\d*[1-9])?) but still the "29123.6 from 29123.6400, 4 is gone from there.":( –  Rendy Jan 6 '13 at 10:35
    
@Rendy you are using the wrong regex..the regex is ^\d+(\.\d*[1-9])? and it is working –  Anirudha Jan 6 '13 at 10:39
    
@Rendy no need of (?:.0*$ use my above regex..u dont need to modify it..just match it with the above regex... –  Anirudha Jan 6 '13 at 10:39
    
Oops sorry, but it doesn't work in Obj-C, I just wonder whether this is the ios bug. It doesn't eliminate the 0 significant number for all cases. –  Rendy Jan 6 '13 at 10:41

You simply want this:

^\d*(\.?\d*[1-9])?
  1. ^\d* that means one or more digit before the first group.
  2. In the () that describes matching group.
  3. \.? means single DOT(.) can be there but optional. eg. (.)
  4. \d* there can be one or more digits. eg. (1234)
  5. \.?\d* there can be one DOT and one or more digit eg. (.123)
  6. [1-9] this includes only digit from 1 to 9 only excluding 0. eg. (2344)

Regex

share|improve this answer
    
same case with @Blender :( –  Rendy Jan 6 '13 at 10:23
    
still the same :( this is really strange –  Rendy Jan 6 '13 at 10:37
    
I just updated my answer..@Rendy –  Vishal Suthar Jan 6 '13 at 10:37
    
From 29123.6400 it comes 29123.64 so 4 is there..look at the regex demo I provided..@Rendy –  Vishal Suthar Jan 6 '13 at 10:41

I don't know whether Objective-C supports something like the following construct, but in Python you can do it completely without regular expressions using str.rstrip():

In [1]: def shorten_number(number):
   ...:     return number.rstrip('0').rstrip('.')

In [2]: shorten_number('29000.12345678900')
Out[2]: '29000.123456789'

In [3]: shorten_number('29000.000')
Out[3]: '29000' 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.