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I use Visual Studio 2010.

struct SPoint
{
    int id;
    int X;
    int Y;
};
////////////////
vector<SPoint> points;
vector<SPoint> chosen;
////////////////
void print_vect(const vector<SPoint> & vect)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < vect.size(); ++i)
    {
        cout << vect[i].id << " (" << vect[i].X << "," << vect[i].Y << ")"<<endl;               
    }               
    cout << endl;   
}
////////////////
print_vect(points);

The compiler shows:

1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\algorithm(4674): error C2784: 'bool std::operator <(const std::move_iterator<_RanIt> &,const std::move_iterator<_RanIt2> &)' : could not deduce template argument for 'const std::move_iterator<_RanIt> &' from 'SPoint'
1>          c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\iterator(371) : see declaration of 'std::operator <'

I modeled this in a separate project:

struct SPoint
{   
    int X;
    int Y;
};

vector<SPoint> points;
vector<SPoint> selected;

void print_vector(const vector<SPoint> & points) {    
    for (int i = 0; i < points.size(); i++)
    {
        cout << '('<<points[i].X <<',' <<points[i].Y <<')'<< endl;
    }
    cout << endl;
}
int main ()
{
    SPoint temp = {0, 0};
    for (int i = 0; i < 11;i++)
    {
        temp.X = i;
        temp.Y = i;
        points.push_back(temp);
    }
    for (int i = 5; i< 11;i++)
    {
        temp.X = i;
        temp.Y = i;
        selected.push_back(temp);
    }

    print_vector(points);       
    system ("pause" );
  return 0;
}

It works perfectly. I tried to find something on this problem. They say, the compiler can't compare two objects. Add "<" method to your class. But I'm studying procedural programming so far. Then, my trial example works. Why and what to do?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by interjay, jogojapan, SCFrench, Mario, Frank van Puffelen Jan 6 '13 at 14:50

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
which line does the error occur on ? –  Mark Jan 6 '13 at 9:57
    
Not being able to deduce the parameter from SPoint makes it sound like it's misinterpreting vector<SPoint>. Ensure <vector> is included and some form of using is done before that. –  chris Jan 6 '13 at 9:58
    
Compiles okay? ideone.com/SxLmKd bool std::operator < makes me thing you're not showing us the code, and in the code you're not showing us you have < instead of <<. –  ta.speot.is Jan 6 '13 at 10:00
    
Maybe this can show some light? skydrive.live.com/… –  Kifsif Jan 6 '13 at 10:04

1 Answer 1

In your code, set_difference calls operator< to compare elements in points/chosen:

set_difference(points.begin(), points.end(),
    chosen.begin(), chosen.end(), back_inserter(cleared));

To make your code compile, you need to overload operator< for SPoint type, for example:

bool operator<(const SPoint& lhs, const SPoint& rhs)
{
  return lhs.id < rhs.id;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Where do you see the set_difference call? –  interjay Jan 6 '13 at 10:19
    
he puts it in skydrive.... skydrive.live.com/… –  billz Jan 6 '13 at 10:20
    
@Kifsif please update your question with relative code –  billz Jan 6 '13 at 10:21

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