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I am coding a Multiplayer game in which each player MUST play with every player in his group only once. i.e. if you have 3 players: Joe, Mary and Peter, these will be the combinations: Joe & Mary, Joe & Peter and Mary & Peter.

The code to calculate the number of rounds was pretty easy. Since the number of rounds are equal to n! / r! * (n - r)! where n is equal to the number of players and r is equal to 2 (since the game is being played 2 players at each round).

 public int factorial(int n)
 {
      if (n == 0)
          return 1;
      return n * factorial(n - 1);
 }

 public int calcNoOfRounds()
 {
      return factorial(noOfPlayers) / (factorial(2) * factorial(noOfPlayers -2));
 }

However I am stuck to produce an efficient way to return the actual player combinations. I tried the following code. It works, however it is too manual and there are things which I want to be improved. In this code I am pairing p1 vs p2, p2 vs p3, p3 vs p4 ... p(n-1) vs p(n). Then I am starting from the 3rd player onwards and matching those players with all those players above except the one before them i.e. p3 vs p1, p4 vs p1, p4 vs p2, p5 vs p1, p5 vs p2, p5 vs p3, etc.. Do you think I can do it in a better way?

 public void calcPlayerCombinations()
 {
     List<string> playerNames = new List<string>();

     for (int i = 0; i < noOfPlayers; i++)
     {
          playerNames.Add(players[i].PlayerName);
     }

     for (int i = 0; i < noOfPlayers - 1; i++)
     {
          playerCombinations.Add(playerNames[i] + " " + playerNames[i + 1]);
     }

     for (int j = 3; j <= noOfPlayers; j++)
     {
          int counter = 1;

          do
          {
             playerCombinations.Add(playerNames[j -1] + " " + playerNames[counter -1]);
             counter++;

          } while (counter != (j - 1));
     }
 }

I don't like it this way since if the game was really being played, how would you like the same player playing 6 consecutive games? I could randomly pick a combination for a round yes, but still, I would like to know a better way for future reference.

Thanks for any help!

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This example shows how to use a list of players as a queue. When a player has played they are put to the back and will be least likely to be picked again. It also shows how to do what Jon Skeet did but eager (without the yield).

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace SOPlayersOrder
{
    class Program
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Represents a match up between two players.
        /// It is tempting to use strings for everything, but don't do it,
        /// you'll only end up having to split those strings and you will
        /// not benefit from type safety.
        /// </summary>
        public class MatchUp
        {
            public string Player1 { get; set; }
            public string Player2 { get; set; }

            public override string ToString()
            {
                return string.Format("{0} vs {1}", Player1, Player2);
            }
        }

        public static IEnumerable<MatchUp> PairPlayers(List<string> players)
        {
            var results = new List<MatchUp>();
            for (int i = 0; i < players.Count - 1; i++)
            {
                for (int j = i + 1; j < players.Count; j++)
                {
                    var matchup = new MatchUp { Player1 = players[i], Player2 = players[j] };
                    //yield return matchup; //this is how Jon Skeet suggested, I am showing you "eager" evaluation
                    results.Add(matchup);
                }
            }
            return results;
        }

        public static IEnumerable<MatchUp> OrganiseGames(IEnumerable<string> players, IEnumerable<MatchUp> games)
        {
            var results = new List<MatchUp>();
            //a list that we will treat as a queue - most recently played at the back of the queue
            var playerStack = new List<string>(players);
            //a list that we can modify
            var gamesList = new List<MatchUp>(games);
            while (gamesList.Count > 0)
            {
                //find a game for the top player on the stack
                var player1 = playerStack.First();
                var player2 = playerStack.Skip(1).First();
                //the players are in the order of least recently played first
                MatchUp matchUp = FindFirstAvailableGame(playerStack, gamesList);
                //drop the players that just played to the back of the list
                playerStack.Remove(matchUp.Player1);
                playerStack.Remove(matchUp.Player2);
                playerStack.Add(matchUp.Player1);
                playerStack.Add(matchUp.Player2);
                //remove that pairing
                gamesList.Remove(matchUp);
                //yield return matchUp; //optional way of doing this
                results.Add(matchUp);
            }
            return results;
        }

        private static MatchUp FindFirstAvailableGame(List<string> players, List<MatchUp> gamesList)
        {            
            for (int i = 0; i < players.Count - 1; i++)
            {
                for (int j = i + 1; j < players.Count; j++)
                {
                    var game = gamesList.FirstOrDefault(g => g.Player1 == players[i] && g.Player2 == players[j] ||
                                                             g.Player2 == players[i] && g.Player1 == players[j]);
                    if (game != null) return game;
                }
            }
            throw new Exception("Didn't find a game");
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var players = new List<string>(new []{"A","B","C","D","E"});
            var allGames = new List<MatchUp>(PairPlayers(players));

            Console.WriteLine("Unorganised");

            foreach (var game in allGames)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(game);
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Organised");

            foreach (var game in OrganiseGames(players, allGames))
            {
                Console.WriteLine(game);
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow thanks weston! That's a very detailed answer and a neat piece of code :) Tested it and it worked. Thanks a lot for your time :) –  Bernice Jan 6 '13 at 13:05
    
The part which was a bit confusing for me was this line: var game = gamesList.FirstOrDefault(g => g.Player1 == players[i] && g.Player2 == players[j] || g.Player2 == players[i] && g.Player1 == players[j]); what does this mean? I understand the purpose of the method but I got confused on how it works. Thanks –  Bernice Jan 6 '13 at 13:25
1  
It's looking for the first MatchUp that contains the two players players[i] and players[j]. The expression g => ... is known as a lambda expression. g represents a MatchUp from the list, and on the right handside of the => is a boolean expression that tells us if it is a matchup suitable for these players or not. The or (||) is because the players may be in the different order, though thinking about it now, this shouldn't happen. If it does not find a MatchUp (because that game has already been played), then the OrDefault part causes it to return null. –  weston Jan 6 '13 at 15:41
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Why would you not just pair each player (as "first" in a pairing) with each player later than them (as "second")? For example:

public static IEnumerable<string> PairPlayers(List<string> players)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < players.Count - 1; i++)
    {
        for (int j = i + 1; j < players.Count; j++)
        {
            yield return players[i] + " " + players[j];
        }
    }
}

(Obviously you can do this eagerly too, should you wish.)

It's possible that I've misinterpreted the requirements though.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. That would be very similar to what I just did (though done in an easier way). It's not as bad as I thought then. I tend to think harder than the actual problem. What does yield mean please? And why are you returning IEnumerable<sting> ? –  Bernice Jan 6 '13 at 10:08
    
I have another question. How can I use this algorithm but at the same time don't have consecutive rounds with the same player playing? Since with this algorithm there would be 5 consecutive rounds in which player 1 has to play and I don't want that. I tried generating a list with non-duplicate randomized numbers and choosing one player combination from the list randomly, however this results almost in an infinite loop. How can I do this? –  Bernice Jan 6 '13 at 10:47
    
@Bernice - please do not put new questions in the comments, chances are they will not be read, answered and, more importantly, found by others who are looking for a similar answer. –  Erno de Weerd Jan 6 '13 at 12:34
    
You are right Erno. Will keep that in mind for future questions :) I'm still new to this site. –  Bernice Jan 6 '13 at 12:59
    
@Bernice: Once you've got the complete list, you could shuffle it. As for what yield return is about - that's an iterator block; search for it on MSDN and you'll find a good tutorial. –  Jon Skeet Jan 6 '13 at 15:48
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