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I have a mysql table which looks something like this:

id_one     id_two
1          2
2          1
3          2
2          3
4          5
5          4

I want to delete rows with two duplicate values inrespective of which columns they are in so the example would look like this:

id_one     id_two
1          2
3          2
5          4

There are over 12 million rows in total. Any ideas on how I should do this? Php or mysql query would be preferred.

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In which language ? –  Siamak.A.M Jan 6 '13 at 10:47
    
why 3,2 instead of 2,3? –  John Woo Jan 6 '13 at 10:48
    
php or mysql query would be preferred. @JW It doesnt actually matter in which order they are in. –  user1911058 Jan 6 '13 at 10:50
    
so that's why you 3,2 instead of 2,3 since it comes first on the result? –  John Woo Jan 6 '13 at 10:52
    
Is there a UNIQUE key or something on the two columns? –  Niko Jan 6 '13 at 10:54

3 Answers 3

DELETE a
FROM table1 a
LEFT JOIN
    (
      select id_one, id_two
      from   Table1
      GROUP BY least(id_one, id_two), greatest(id_one, id_two)
    ) b ON a.id_one = b.id_one AND a.id_two = b.id_two
WHERE b.id_two IS NULL
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Note: This would also delete the rows with id_one=id_two. –  wildplasser Jan 6 '13 at 12:36
    
@wildplasser how come it will delete the records when id_one=id_two. can you modify this one? –  John Woo Jan 6 '13 at 12:49
    
because for one=two, least(one,two) equals greatest(one,two) –  wildplasser Jan 6 '13 at 12:51
    
@wildplasser then why will it delete? my fiddle shows it does not. sqlfiddle.com/#!2/b264f/1 –  John Woo Jan 6 '13 at 12:52
    
Because you data does not happen to have records with id_one=id_two. –  wildplasser Jan 6 '13 at 12:55

I would advise a 2-step approach:

  1. Make id_one always the smaller value, i.e., if id_one is larger than id_two then swap their values - consider something like this (taken from here):

    UPDATE tablename
    SET id_one = (@temp:=id_one), id_one = id_two, id_two = @temp
    WHERE id_one > id_two
    
  2. Remove the duplicates as described here:

    DELETE tablename FROM tablename INNER JOIN
        (SELECT min(primary_key) AS min_id, id_one, id_two FROM tablename
         GROUP BY id_one, id_two
         HAVING count(1) > 1) AS d
    ON (d.id_one = tablename.id_one
        AND d.id_two = tablename.id_two
        AND d.min_id <> tablename.primary_key)
    

    (I assume that you will have a primary key on a table that holds 12 million entries.)

Not tested, so please backup your data!

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I don't have a primary key. –  user1911058 Jan 6 '13 at 11:24
    
Then you should probably add one. ALTER TABLE tablename ADD id INT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT - you can remove it after the procedure if you're sure about not needing one. –  Niko Jan 6 '13 at 11:26
DELETE FROM ztable zt
WHERE zt.id_one > zt.id_two
  AND EXISTS (
    SELECT * 
    FROM ztable tx
    WHERE tx.id_one = zt.id_two
      AND tx.id_two = zt.id_one
    )
    ;

won't work in mysql, because in mysql you cannot reference the table being updated or deleted. Since you want to make a backup copy anyway, you could use that instead in the EXISTS subquery:

CREATE table safetable AS (SELECT * from ztable);

DELETE FROM ztable zt 
WHERE zt.id_one > zt.id_two 
AND EXISTS (
   SELECT * 
   FROM safetable tx
   WHERE tx.id_one = zt.id_two 
     AND tx.id_two = zt.id_one
   );
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