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I get the below exception when I try to add/insert/remove to a collection (or any operation that changes the collection). The collection is initialized and the item inserted is not null and of the same type as the collection T.

Can any one give me a clue as to why this happens?

The runtime has encountered a fatal error. The address of the error was at 0x60f41744, on thread 0x231c. The error code is 0x80131623.
This error may be a bug in the CLR or in the unsafe or non-verifiable portions of user code. Common sources of this bug include user marshaling errors for COM-interop or PInvoke, which may corrupt the stack.

Update: The collection is an ObservableCollection, and I managed to get down to know that it happens on the notify part of the collection changed.

This happens on the UI thread inside a task with the TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext() option.

The weird thing is if I remove this (TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext()) option the add/insert/remove action, all seems to work good.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The error code is 0x80131623

That's a very specific error code, COR_E_FAILFAST. Only one way to generate it, somebody called Environment.FailFast().

Clearly the challenge is to find out what code called that. First look in the Windows Application event log, there ought to be a message about it that gives the primary reason for the call, whatever string was passed to FailFast().


The application requested process termination through System.Environment.FailFast(string message).
at System.Environment.FailFast(System.String)
at System.Windows.WeakEventManager.DeliverEventToList(System.Object, System.EventArgs, ListenerList)
at System.Windows.WeakEventManager.DeliverEvent(System.Object, System.EventArgs)

Yes, there's an Assert() in that code. I'll just post what I can see in the Reference Source, I don't know enough about your code to see what you did wrong. Other than that threading is certainly a good way to get this kind of problem triggered, ObservableCollection is entirely thread-unsafe and must be protected by a lock.

   // if the event isn't handled, something is seriously wrong.  This
   // means a listener registered to receive the event, but refused to
   // handle it when it was delivered.  Such a listener is coded incorrectly.
   if (!handled)
   {
       Invariant.Assert(handled,
                   SR.Get(SRID.ListenerDidNotHandleEvent),
                   SR.Get(SRID.ListenerDidNotHandleEventDetail, iwel.GetType(), managerType));
   }
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Well, I found a call in the event viewer for FailFast: Framework Version: v4.0.30319 Description: The application requested process termination through System.Environment.FailFast(string message). Stack: at System.Environment.FailFast(System.String) at System.Windows.WeakEventManager.DeliverEventToList(System.Object, System.EventArgs, ListenerList) at System.Windows.WeakEventManager.DeliverEvent(System.Object, System.EventArgs) It is clear to be from the notify of the ObservableCollection but why? And why only on the UI thread it happens? –  shahar eldad Jan 6 '13 at 14:41
    
Sorry - but the no-enter key in the comments is hard :) –  shahar eldad Jan 6 '13 at 14:46
    
Answer updated. –  Hans Passant Jan 6 '13 at 14:59
    
So basically something changed the collection while I was adding an item to it? I can't understand what could have change it since I'm the only one using this collection and this is also the only time I change the collection. - Very weird –  shahar eldad Jan 6 '13 at 15:25
1  
Someone has to open a bug with Microsoft then. This is totally the wrong behavior - there are known defined exceptions for a case like this. This handler should be replaced with the proper exception (from InvalidOperationException to something else). –  TomTom Jan 6 '13 at 15:31

Bad memory, corrupt runtime.

THis is a fatal error like that - and thus it is NOT a .NET level mistake, it points toward some memory corruption for whatever reason, as it says. Could be bad memory, bad power supply, or a program error in a non-managed part that corrupted memory. OR an error in the runtime (JIT level, i.e. the part that deals with the assembler level, or the WPF/native area), but I somehow doubt that.

Btw., it is not too smart to post an error description without - ah - the TYPE of the error.

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I've updated my question. Sorry but I don`t accept it to simply be a behind the scenes error. I'm doing something wrong and I want to know what as you can see from my update. –  shahar eldad Jan 6 '13 at 13:21
    
Nope. Sorry. PER DEFINITION - this can not be your error. Anything YOU do should result in a .NET level exception. Not corrupt memory. This is the guarantee of the managed language. WHATEVER you do, it HAS to throw an EXCEPTION. What you have is an ERROR - corrupt memory, which is impossible to generate (theoretically) with managed code. I Would look in google for the error code and and play around, apply patches, submit bug to Microsoft. –  TomTom Jan 6 '13 at 13:27
    
NOTHING you do in managed code only is allowed to result in this error. NOTHING. –  TomTom Jan 6 '13 at 13:28
    
The problem is that I have two different states here: One where the operation success in the background thread and one where the opertaion fails in the UI thread. So the question here is why I cannot update an ObservableCollection from the UI thread? –  shahar eldad Jan 6 '13 at 13:35
    
Irrelevant. Any update you do from the UI thread should result in an exception, not an error. It should not be able to corrupt the memory. So, this pretty much boils down to either hardware issues, or a BUG SOMEWHERE IN THE JIT / NATIVE PART SOMEWHERE, not something you have control over. –  TomTom Jan 6 '13 at 15:28

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