Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following is impossible in Java, since interfaces don't have implementations:

class A {
    protected void foo() {
        /* A impl */
    }
    protected void baz() {
    }
}
interface B {
    /* here's what's impossible to have in Java. */
    protected void foo() {
        /* B impl incl. call to baz() */
    }
}

class C extends A {
    /* stuff that's not in B... */
}

class D extends C implements B {
    void bar() {
        foo(); /* uses the B impl */
}

class E extends A {
    void bar() {
        foo(); /* uses the A impl */
}

class F extends C implements B {
    void bar() {
        foo(); /* uses the B impl */
}

What I want is for D to inherit C, but not to have to override foo() itself; rather, I want it to merely indicate "I use the known modification from B". What's the right idiom in this scenarion?

Notes:

  • Yes, I do expect to need to change my design; but change it to what? That's what I came here to ask.
  • I know Java, please don't re-explain abstract classes and interfaces in your answers.
  • This should have been possible with multiple inheritance - D could inherit both C and B (assuming no other conflicts).
  • Java 6 please; Java 7 if absolutely necessary; Java 8 not relevant for me.
  • The B implementation cannot be moved up into A, since the A implementation really is the default and other classes inherit directly from it (e.g. class E).
  • C and B are not familiar with each other and cannot mention each other.
  • The B implementation cannot be moved down into D, since other classes need it which are not familiar with D (e.g. class F).
  • This is not the diamond problem of multiple inheritance since there's no ambiguity regarding whose override to implement. Although there is a sort of a diamond pattern A->B,C->D .
share|improve this question
5  
interface B can not have an implementation, only a method signature. So A should be the only valid one?? –  Erik Ekman Jan 6 '13 at 11:58
    
you cannot inherit two classes. So recheck your program's design to fix this problem. –  kaysush Jan 6 '13 at 12:00
1  
Aren't you looking for an abstract class? –  fge Jan 6 '13 at 12:07
1  
"The B implementation cannot be moved up into A, since the A implementation really is the default and other classes inherit directly from it (e.g. class E)." B cannot have an implementation. It is a interface and, by definition, lacks implementations. Your question doesn't make sense because you keep insisting that B has implemented methods, which is not possible for an interface. If you want B to implement methods, it must be a class. –  Mike Jan 6 '13 at 12:32
1  
You say "The following is impossible in Java, since interfaces don't have implementations:", but that is the entire point of interfaces. You might as well make a variable final, then complain that you can't change the variable. It's like saying "This square is a bad square because I made it circle." So why make it circle? Just make it a square. You're intentionally preventing yourself from doing something, then complaining that you can't do that thing. –  Mike Jan 6 '13 at 12:42
show 10 more comments

6 Answers

Unless you are using Java 1.8, you cannot have any implementation in the interface, so your question is based on the wrong assumption: You only ever have the implementation of A.foo in C and D.

With Java 1.8, you can have so called virtual extension methods in interfaces. There it should be possible using the following syntax:

class ExtenderOfB {
  public static void foo(B b) {
    //...
  }
}

interface B {
  public void foo() default ExtenderOfB.foo;
}

class D extends C implements B {
  public void bar() {
    B.super.foo();
  }
}

However, since the magic essentially boils down to calling a static method, you can do that for yourself already:

Create a helper class that provides the default implementation of B.foo using a static void foo(B b) and call it from D.bar via HelperClass.foo(this).

share|improve this answer
    
Your suggestion can't work (I think) since these are all non-static methods. –  einpoklum Jan 6 '13 at 12:25
    
@einpoklum The question uses non-static methods, but that isn't possible in Java, even with 1.8. However, virtual extension methods are similar enough. The draft specifies them as follows: The default clause names the default implementation, which is a static method. The signature of the default implementation must be compatible with that of the extension method, with the type of the enclosing interface inserted as the first argument. (section 2) –  nd. Jan 6 '13 at 12:32
    
This new feature of Java 8 is very nifty, granted, but it doesn't answer my question :-( .... also, note that B relies on code in A. –  einpoklum Jan 6 '13 at 13:51
add comment

You can solve this problem using multilevel inheritance

class A
{
    //implementation of A
}

class B extends A
{
  public void foo()
 {
  //you can give your implementation of foo() here
 }
  //includes A's methods also.

}

class C extends B
{
  //will have methods from both A and B
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Not the edited version of the question, unfortunately. –  einpoklum Jan 6 '13 at 12:18
    
@einpoklum either B has to be a class and if B is interface then implementing class has to provide its implementation. –  kaysush Jan 6 '13 at 12:24
    
But that's the problem I have here. B can't be a class, since Java doesn't have multiple inheritance, but it can't be an interface since interfaces don't have implementations. –  einpoklum Jan 6 '13 at 12:32
    
that's what i'm saying since Java doesn't support Multiple Inheritance you will have you change design of your implementation. –  kaysush Jan 6 '13 at 12:38
    
Ok, the question is: Change it to what? –  einpoklum Jan 6 '13 at 13:52
show 1 more comment

You probably need a redesign here, but...

class D extends C implements B {
    void bar() {
        foo(); /* used the B impl */
}

is valid only if interface B declares foo as a method signature (protected void foo();) and if D implements foo (since it would then implement the valid B interface). Thus bar() would then call the foo() method that D implements, since it would be most local to D.

share|improve this answer
    
D can't implement foo itself. The implementation has to be in B, since multiple classes need the same implementation and they are not familiar with D, only with A and B. –  einpoklum Jan 6 '13 at 12:26
    
D must implements foo itself if it implements B. B declares foo as an interface method signature, so any implementing class must implement the foo method. The implementation can't be in B, since B is an interface and thus cannot implement any methods. Not sure what you mean by multiple classes only being familiar with A and B. You can make any class "familiar" with any other class in Java. –  khiner Jan 6 '13 at 12:36
    
Your answer is that I must not code what I need to code.... I'm looking for an altenative to using an interface. –  einpoklum Jan 6 '13 at 13:20
    
@einpoklum that's what every body is saying ,alternative of you interface problem is using a class which every body as already given you as solution. –  kaysush Jan 6 '13 at 15:52
add comment

A little crash course about interfaces and abstract classes here...

Java indeed does not have multiple inheritance in the sense that you can only extend one class -- however, you can implement more than one interface.

And there are abstract classes. Say you have:

interface B {
    void foo();
}

// A is abstract, and it does not implement foo(): this will be left to 
// its inheritors
abstract class A implements B {
    // Method with implementation
    protected void bar() {}
    // Method which must be implemented in inheriting classes
    abstract void baz();
}

// Concrete implementation of A: note that there is no need to specify
// "implements B" since A already does
class C extends A {
    // C must implement baz()  since it is declared abstract in A,
    // but must also implement foo() since A implements B, and A
    // has no implementation of it
}

Also, an abstract class can extend another abstract class:

// D also implements B since A does.
abstract class D extends A {
    // But this time, D implements foo() from B
    @Override
    void foo() {}
}

class E extends D {
    // E must still implement the abstract baz() method declared in A
}

Do not hesitate to ask for more details, I will edit as appropriate.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not meet my requirements, as: 1. D has a foo() implementation which is not specific to it (e.g. shared by other classes 'implementing' my impossible interface B) 2. The interface of foo() might depend on A ; and in general, B might depend on A even without inheriting it. –  einpoklum Jan 6 '13 at 13:28
    
Well, you know, you can also have interfaces extend other interfaces. Bah, I'll have tried. –  fge Jan 6 '13 at 13:33
add comment

In the scenario one class A should implement the the interface B as well as both have method foo().

Then class C extends A it doesn't have to implement B as it has the default implementation by the superclass.

Then class D extends C and wrapped the method foo() by the method bar() without overriding it. This is idiom.

The code

  interface B {
    void foo();
  }

  class A  implements B {
    public void foo() {
      /* B impl */
    }
  }

  class C extends A  {
    /* stuff that's not in B... */
  }

  class D extends C  {
    void bar() {
      foo(); /* used the B impl */
    }
  }
share|improve this answer
    
This does not meet the requirements, please re-read my question... –  einpoklum Jan 6 '13 at 13:22
add comment

Is this what you're looking for? (This should be in the comments, since I'm not sure what you're looking for, but it doesn't exactly show up nicely there.)

interface A {
    void foo();
    void baz();
}
class B extends A{
    void foo(){/* B's impl. (must be impl.)*/};
    void baz(){/* B's impl. (must be impl.)*/};
}

class C extends A {
    void foo(){/* C's impl. (must be impl.)*/};
    void baz(){/* C's impl. (must be impl.)*/};
}

class D extends C {
    void foo(){/* D's impl */};
    void baz(){/* D's impl, if not included C's impl will be used */};
}

class E extends B {
    void foo(){/* E's impl, if not included B's impl will be used.*/};
    void baz(){/* E's impl, if not included B's impl will be used.*/};
}

Alternatively, if you want B and C to both share methods from A, you would do this...

class A {
    void foo(){ /*(must be impl.)*/ };
    void baz(){ /*(must be impl.)*/ };
}

class B extends A {
    void foo(){/* B's impl, if not included A's impl will be used*/};
    void baz(){/* B's impl, if not included A's impl will be used*/};
}

class C extends A {
    void foo(){/* C's impl, if not included A's impl will be used*/};
    void baz(){/* C's impl, if not included A's impl will be used*/};
}

class D extends C {
    void foo(){/* D's impl, if not included C's impl will be used */};
    void baz(){/* D's impl, if not included C's impl will be used */};
}

class E extends B {
    void foo(){/* E's impl, if not included B's impl will be used.*/};
    void baz(){/* E's impl, if not included B's impl will be used.*/};
}

If you want A to implement foo(), but not baz(), you would make it abstract, like this...

abstract class A {
    void foo(){ /*(must be impl.)*/ };
    abstract void baz();
}
class B extends A{
    void foo(){/* B's impl, if not included A's impl will be used*/};
    void baz(){ /*(must be impl.)*/ };
}

class C extends A {
    void foo(){/* C's impl, if not included A's impl will be used*/};
    void baz(){ /*(must be impl.)*/ };
}

class D extends C {
    void foo(){/* D's impl, if not included C's impl will be used */};
    void baz(){/* D's impl, if not included C's impl will be used */};
}

class E extends B {
    void foo(){/* E's impl, if not included B's impl will be used.*/};
    void baz(){/* E's impl, if not included B's impl will be used.*/};
}
share|improve this answer
    
No it isn't... C and B are unaware of each other, and can't mention each other. –  einpoklum Jan 6 '13 at 12:20
    
C is aware of B, it extends B. But no, B is not aware of C. If you call C.foo() but did not implement C.foo(), B.foo() will be executed instead. –  Mike Jan 6 '13 at 12:21
    
Edited to make C implement A instead of extending B. –  Mike Jan 6 '13 at 13:22
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.