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Reading some topics I found this piece of code, and I'm wondering, how does it works, because it prinst:

5
2

The code:

static int a = 7;

int test()
{
  return a--;
}

int main()
{
  for(test();test();test())
  {
    cout << test() << "\n";
  }
  return 0;
}
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7  
Funny name, I almost thought it was random. –  chris Jan 6 '13 at 12:19
3  
Which part don't you understand? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 6 '13 at 12:19
    
@OliCharlesworth i don't understad how does the for loop work. –  ddacot Jan 6 '13 at 12:21
1  
rand() is not rand() afterall. sigh. –  TJ- Jan 6 '13 at 12:23
1  
@cloudygoose In your last part "rand()=0 <= 0"; it needs to be ==0, not <=0 to terminate. Likewise where you say "rand()=3 > 0", it should be rand()=3 != 0 –  Fraser Jan 6 '13 at 12:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Order of operations, as presented:

  1. a is globally initialized on startup. to 7
  2. Initializer of for-loop is hit first, test() decrements a to 6, then returns the prior value (7), which is ignored.
  3. The test case of for-loop is hit, test() decrements a to 5, then returns the prior value (6) which passes the non-zero test so the for-loop can continue.
  4. The cout statement; test() decrements a to 4, returning the prior value (5) which is sent to cout.
  5. The increment-statement of the for-loop is executed. test() decrements a to 3, returning the prior value (4), which is ignored.
  6. The test case of the for-loop is hit. test() decrements a to 2, returning the prior value (3), which passes the non-zero test and the loop continues.
  7. The cout statement; test() decrements a to 1, returning the prior value (2) which is sent to cout.
  8. The increment-statement of the for-loop is executed. test() decrements a to 0, returning the prior value (1), which is ignored.
  9. The test case of the for-loop is hit. test() decrements a to -1, returning the prior value (0), which fails the non-zero test and the loop terminates.

Now. Start that loop at 6 or 8 and see what happens. =P

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thanks, but why it returns the prior value? is there a rule or something about the static variables? –  ddacot Jan 6 '13 at 12:41
3  
@ddacot The post-unary operators (both -- and ++) work that way by design. The statement x = a++ does two things. (1) increments a by one, and (2) returns the prior value of a as the expression value, which is then assigned to x. For some reason instructors teach this completely wrong. They say "a is assigned to x, then a is incremented." While it may appear that way, that is not, in fact, the correct order of operations. –  WhozCraig Jan 6 '13 at 12:47
    
thanks, now i really got it. –  ddacot Jan 6 '13 at 12:59
    
@ddacot Though a separate issue, it merits pointing out, and I'll do so with a very simple code sample to prove the order of operations in a post-unary operator if you desire. It is trivial to demonstrate, and worth an occasional zinger to an instructor that thinks they know better. If you want a sample, let me know. –  WhozCraig Jan 6 '13 at 21:18
    
What is rand supposed to be? –  0x499602D2 Jan 6 '13 at 23:31

A for loop of the form:

for (a; b; c) {
    // stuff
}

is equivalent to this:

{
    a;
    while (b) {
        // stuff
        c;
    }
}
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