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I have the following code:

for(President obj : SomeClass.SomeObject(President.class))
{
    System.out.println(obj.getFullText());
}

Here, there are various kinds of classes, infact a huge list, such as President, Car, Train, Product, MaleName, FemaleName, and so on. All of these classes have the method getFullText() inside them.

Now, instead of writing:

for(President obj : SomeClass.SomeObject(President.class))
{
    System.out.println(obj.getFullText());
}

for(Car obj : SomeClass.SomeObject(Car.class))
{
    System.out.println(obj.getFullText());
}

.. and so on

I want a generalized short method that can take the string representations of all the names like "President", "Car", "Product", and so on and then invoke this method on that particular class object "obj" so that inside the loop I can do what I want with the returned value of this method.

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2  
you want Reflection. It is possible. –  Karthik T Jan 6 '13 at 12:54

2 Answers 2

The answer is to use reflection. But this is complex, and leads to all sorts of subtle problems if you're not careful.

The best policy is to rethink your design to avoid needing to do this. One option is to use the factory pattern.

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Assuming the class has a public constructor without any argument, and is called com.mydomain.app.Car, the follwoing loads the class and calls the constructor:

Class<?> clazz = Class.forName("com.mydomain.app.Car");
Car car = (Car) clazz.newInstance();

That is called reflection. But it should be used extremely seldomly, for special kinds of problems. You should tell us what you actually want to achieve, so that we coan help you do it with a more type-safe, OO and efficient way. For example, you could use the factory pattern:

public interface Drivable {
    public void drive();
}

public class Car implements Drivable {
    ...
}

public class Bus implements Drivable {
    ...
}

public class DrivableFactory {
    public static Drivable create(String kind) {
        if ("bus".equals(kind)) {
            return new Bus();
        }
        else if ("car".equals(kind)) {
            return new Car();
        }
        else {
            throw new ImmegalArgumentException("sorry, I can't create " + kind);
        }
    }
}

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Drivable d = DrivableFactory.create(args[0]);
        d.drive();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I will try this out. It looks like this is exactly what I wanted to know - reflection!. I will pass various names of classes as a parameter for the forName() method and get a general clazz object. I will later use this clazz object to call a particular method that I know is present inside all the classes which I want to refer. I hope what I want is now clear. Do you agree this is the best method to implement? –  Abhishek Shivkumar Jan 6 '13 at 12:59
    
No, it's not the best way to do it. All the classes should implement a common interface, and you should have a factory which returns a new instance of the appropriate class, based on a string input. –  JB Nizet Jan 6 '13 at 13:02
    
You should look into interfaces and the factory pattern to solve this problem. Creating classes like this feels dirty. –  Jeroen Vannevel Jan 6 '13 at 13:02
    
Ok, I am going to edit my question now that should reflect with my new explanation in 2 mins :) –  Abhishek Shivkumar Jan 6 '13 at 13:04
    
Look at my edited answer for an example. –  JB Nizet Jan 6 '13 at 13:06

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