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I'm trying to perform an SQL injection on a dummy website created on my localhost for a security testing project.

I tried to enter the string " OR "=' into the username and password field so it should bypass it and display Login Correct - But instead it displays login failed

Any help to understand why SQL injection is not working

<?php
    mysql_connect('localhost', 'root', '');
    mysql_select_db('test');

    if(isset($_POST['username'])&&isset($_POST['password'])){
       $username =$_POST['username'];
       $password = $_POST['password'];
       echo $username;
       echo $password;

       if(!empty($username)&&!empty($password)){
          $query ="SELECT id FROM users WHERE username = '$username' AND password = '$password'";
          $query_run = mysql_query($query);

          if(mysql_num_rows($query_run)>=1){
              echo 'Login Correct';
          }else{
              echo 'Login Failed';
          }
       }
    }
?>
<form action="test.php" method="POST">
   Username: <input type="text" name="username">
   Password: <input type="text" name="password">
   <input type="submit" value="Submit">
</form>
share|improve this question
    
Probably a magic quotes issue –  user1909426 Jan 6 '13 at 14:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Your injection string should be like this:
Username and password:

' or '1' = '1

Username (often) or password: (It depends on which one come first in the query)
# comments rest of the query.

' or '1'='1' #

For more information about SQL injection, you can check out this perfect url:
The SQL Injection Knowledge Base

Also you can download my made slides (ms power point file (ppsx)) about practical SQL-injection:
SQL-injection in action

share|improve this answer
1  
...There's the right one. The # is important. Otherwise the injection would have to be in the password field. –  Michael Berkowski Jan 6 '13 at 14:06

Try injecting this: ' or '1' = '1' --

'1' = '1' is always true and -- says everything after the -- is an comment and won't be checked.

share|improve this answer
2  
I've found that in some db implementations (mysql in particular) you need to have a space before the -- otherwise it isn't counted as a comment. –  Steve Jan 7 '13 at 22:51
    
Thanks, didn't know that. Just edited my answer! :) –  P1nGu1n Jan 8 '13 at 15:41

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