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There is the chance that I am stupid right now, but check this. I have a float:

float wordTime=46.81; // I get it after some calculations

Then I am logging this:

NSLog(@"1:%f", wordTime);
NSLog(@"2:%f", (3/2)*wordTime);
NSLog(@"3:%f", (5/2)*wordTime);
NSLog(@"4:%f", (7/2)*wordTime);

I get this: (which has a problem with log number 2)

 46.81
 46.81 // weird
 93.8
140.7

Then I have changed the 3/2 to 1.5 and I got 46, 70, 93, and 140. What am I missing here?

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3/2 is an integer division. –  Mat Jan 6 '13 at 14:15
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

3/2 is interpreted as (int)3/2 and therefore evaluates to 1. You can write out the types explicitly as 3.0f/2.0f instead, which should give the result you expect (just as explicitly casting the whole expression to float).

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so i am stupid :( –  Curnelious Jan 6 '13 at 14:16
3  
@Rant You're not stupid. You just haven't read fully that C tutorial :) Do that. (General advice: try to master C before touching Obejctive-C/OS X/iOS programming.) –  user529758 Jan 6 '13 at 14:18
3  
Everyone was bitten by this once. At least once, that is :) –  zoul Jan 6 '13 at 14:18
    
thanks a lot both. this is the second time it happens to me . –  Curnelious Jan 6 '13 at 14:20
    
@Rant If you were stupid you probably wouldn't have noticed that your code was incorrectly dividing! (Well, it was dividing correctly from a C standard but you know what I mean) –  0x7fffffff Jan 6 '13 at 14:21
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Cast one of the operands so the other operand will be promoted to float and you'll have a float division instead of an integer division:

NSLog(@"2:%f",(3.0/2)*wordTime  );
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