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I want to calculate the number of days passed between past date and a current date. My past date is in the format dd/mm/yyyy format. I have used below mentioned formulas but giving the propoer output.

=DAYS360(A2,TODAY()) =MINUS(D2,TODAY())

In the above formula A2 = 4/12/2012 (dd/mm/yyyy) and I am not sure whether TODAY returns in dd/mm/yyyy format or not. I have tried using 123 button on the tool bar, but no luck.

I googled this question but didn't found a proper answer. I thought Stackoverflow is better than google :-). Can some one help on this.

-Vikram

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actually, stackoverflow makes google results better. or rather, we at SO do. :) –  törzsmókus Mar 2 '13 at 10:14
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

DAYS360 does not calculate what you want, i.e. the number of days passed between the two dates. Use simple subtraction (-) or MINUS(). I made an updated copy of @DrCord’s sample spreadsheet to illustrate this.

Are you SURE you want DAYS360? That is a specialized function used in the financial sector to simplify calculations for bonds. It assumes a 360 day year, with 12 months of 30 days each. If you really want actual days, you'll lose 6 days each year. [source]

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If you are using the two formulas at the same time, it will not work... Here is a simple spreadsheet with it working: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiOy0YDBXjt4dDJSQWg1Qlp6TEw5SzNqZENGOWgwbGc If you are still getting problems I would need to know what type of erroneous result you are getting.

Today() returns a numeric integer value: Returns the current computer system date. The value is updated when your document recalculates. TODAY is a function without arguments.

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