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I'm having problems receiving file names from server to client (C++) in Mac OS X. I send a serialized object, which has a char pointer with the file name or sometimes a string object. When I receive it in the client, it seems to be having characters %F6 or %E9. This issue doesn't arise in Windows OS though, even though it's the same code. Is there any way to decode these '%' characters back to their original form in Mac OS & Linux?

A few characters I got into problems with:

ǡ ȅ ȉ

It would be difficult to change the code in the server, so if there's a way to decode the characters back to their original form, it would be easier.

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closed as not a real question by tripleee, dda, WhozCraig, Jarrod Roberson, SztupY Jan 7 '13 at 8:14

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
Not enough information. How are you serializing, with what tool/library? How are you deserializing? What you have here is URL-encoding, but it's impossible to understand the problem with so little information. – bmargulies Jan 6 '13 at 16:47
    
I'm using Boost Library for Serialization and i'm just looking for ways to decode %F6 back to ȅ in C++, like if some library is available ..? – Manikanda raj S Jan 6 '13 at 17:38
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks like the characters are being URL-encoded with the assumption of ISO 8859-1 or some similar single-byte code set. The simple answer is that you need to convert "%F6" into '\xF6'; that is, you need to convert the percent plus two hex digits into the corresponding single byte.

That then leaves you with a problem on Mac OS X because file names are usually stored in UTF-8, not in ISO 8859-1 etc. For example (my prompt is 'Osiris JL:'):

Osiris JL: mkdir x
Osiris JL: cd x
Osiris JL: cp /dev/null é
Osiris JL: cp /dev/null è
Osiris JL: ls | odx
0x0000: 65 CC 80 0A 65 CC 81 0A                           e...e...
0x0008:
Osiris JL: ls
è  é
Osiris JL: ls | cat
è
é
Osiris JL: ls | utf8-unicode
(standard input):
0x65 = U+0065
0xCC 0x80 = U+0300
0x0A = U+000A
0x65 = U+0065
0xCC 0x81 = U+0301
0x0A = U+000A
Osiris JL: 

The Unicode characters are U+0065 LATIN SMALL LETTER E plus U+0300 COMBINING GRAVE ACCENT or U+0301 COMBINING ACUTE ACCENT.

This isn't the usual formation for the letters é and è; they are often treated as U+00E9 LATIN SMALL LETTER E WITH ACUTE and U+00E8 LATIN SMALL LETTER E WITH GRAVE.

Note that \xF6 is not a valid byte in UTF-8 text at all, but in ISO 8859-1, ISO 8859-15 (and Windows CP1252), 0xF6 is ö, U+00F6 LATIN SMALL LETTER O WITH DIAERESIS.

Example File Creation on Mac OS X

Here's a program to create some files — source file x.c, run on Mac OS X 10.7.5, compiled with GCC 4.7.1:

#include <dirent.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>

static void create_file(const char *name)
{
    int fd = open(name, O_CREAT|O_TRUNC|O_RDWR, 0644);
    if (fd >= 0)
    {
        close(fd);
        printf("Created file %s OK\n", name);
    }
    else
    {
        printf("Failed to create file %s\n", name);
    }
}

static void print_name(const char *name)
{
    size_t len = strlen(name);
    printf("%-10s = ", name);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < len; i++)
        printf(" %.2X", (unsigned char)name[i]);
    putchar('\n');
}

int main(void)
{
    const char *names[] =
    {
        "a-e\xCC\x80",  /* a-e\u0300 */
        "a-e\xCC\x81",  /* a-e\u0301 */
        "b-\xC3\xA8",   /* b-\u00E8  */
        "b-\xC3\xA9",   /* b-\u00E9  */
        "c-\xF6",
        "c-\xE9",
    };
    enum { NUM_NAMES = sizeof(names) / sizeof(names[0]) };

    for (int i = 0; i < NUM_NAMES; i++)
        create_file(names[i]);

    DIR *dp = opendir(".");
    if (dp != 0)
    {
        struct dirent *entry;
        while ((entry = readdir(dp)) != 0)
            print_name(entry->d_name);
        closedir(dp);
    }
    else
        fprintf(stderr, "error: failed to open current directory\n");

    return(0);
}

This uses the two encodings for a Latin small letter 'e' with acute or grave accents.

It runs cleanly, but you can see that the file names are normalized to use the combining accents, even when specified using U+00E8 or U+00E9 in the file name string:

Osiris JL: ls
è       é       makefile x        x.c
Osiris JL: ./x
Created file a-è OK
Created file a-é OK
Created file b-è OK
Created file b-é OK
Created file c-? OK
Created file c-? OK
.          =  2E
..         =  2E 2E
a-è      =  61 2D 65 CC 80
a-é      =  61 2D 65 CC 81
b-è      =  62 2D 65 CC 80
b-é      =  62 2D 65 CC 81
c-%E9      =  63 2D 25 45 39
c-%F6      =  63 2D 25 46 36
è        =  65 CC 80
é        =  65 CC 81
makefile   =  6D 61 6B 65 66 69 6C 65
x          =  78
x.c        =  78 2E 63
Osiris JL: ls
a-è     a-é     b-è     b-é     c-%E9    c-%F6    è       é       makefile x        x.c
Osiris JL: ls | utf8-unicode
(standard input):
0x61 = U+0061
0x2D = U+002D
0x65 = U+0065
0xCC 0x80 = U+0300
0x0A = U+000A
0x61 = U+0061
0x2D = U+002D
0x65 = U+0065
0xCC 0x81 = U+0301
0x0A = U+000A
0x62 = U+0062
0x2D = U+002D
0x65 = U+0065
0xCC 0x80 = U+0300
0x0A = U+000A
0x62 = U+0062
0x2D = U+002D
0x65 = U+0065
0xCC 0x81 = U+0301
0x0A = U+000A
0x63 = U+0063
0x2D = U+002D
0x25 = U+0025
0x45 = U+0045
0x39 = U+0039
0x0A = U+000A
0x63 = U+0063
0x2D = U+002D
0x25 = U+0025
0x46 = U+0046
0x36 = U+0036
0x0A = U+000A
0x65 = U+0065
0xCC 0x80 = U+0300
0x0A = U+000A
0x65 = U+0065
0xCC 0x81 = U+0301
0x0A = U+000A
0x6D = U+006D
0x61 = U+0061
0x6B = U+006B
0x65 = U+0065
0x66 = U+0066
0x69 = U+0069
0x6C = U+006C
0x65 = U+0065
0x0A = U+000A
0x78 = U+0078
0x0A = U+000A
0x78 = U+0078
0x2E = U+002E
0x63 = U+0063
0x0A = U+000A
Osiris JL: 

This means there are two possible spellings for the character è in a program that creates a file containing LATIN SMALL LETTER E WITH GRAVE.

There are a variety of interesting observations to make about the output of the program, such as the misalignment of the = signs. But a key point is that if you create file names with an invalid UTF-8 character sequence in the name, each invalid byte is URL-encoded to %xx where xx is the hex value corresponding to the invalid byte (which occupies 3 bytes on disk, not 1, AFAICT).

Summary

You will have to decide what your source character set is so that you can accurately translate bytes from the range 0x80..0xFF into the appropriate Unicode characters on Mac OS X, or you will have to tolerate Mac OS X creating file names for you with %F6 in place of ö, etc. The file system will normalize the file name for you, but you must provide it with valid UTF-8 names.

share|improve this answer
    
NB: Although I wrote the program in C and tested with gcc, it is in fact a valid C++ program that compiles without warnings under g++ (compile line g++ -O3 -Wall -Wextra x.c -o x). I would not, however, claim that it is 'good C++ style'. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 6 '13 at 22:01
    
I'm quite sure filenames are actually UTF-16 on HFS+ volumes. – dreamlax Jan 7 '13 at 4:24
    
@dreamlax: It's possible that file names on HFS+ are UTF-16, I suppose; when there's translation going on, who's to say what is on disk and what's in memory. I got as close as I can to the raw data with readdir(), but if translation is occurring below that, it is hard to intercept. You'd probably have to examine raw disk to spot the difference, and I'm too lazy to code up something that does that. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 7 '13 at 5:47

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