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That is, I'm looking for a function true_row such that:

true_row([False, True, True, True, True, False, False])

returns False but

true_row([True, True, True, True, True, False, False])

returns True.

EDIT: In case it helps, I've attached the full code so far below:

position_open = False

def initialize(context):
    context.stock = sid(26578)
    context.open_hours = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24]
    context.is_bullish = [False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False]
    context.first_check_minute = 1
    context.second_check_minute = 57

def handle_data(context, data):

    event_hour = data[context.stock].datetime.hour
    event_minute = data[context.stock].datetime.minute
    hour_open_price = [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
    hour_close_price = [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]

    global position_open

    # Hour 1 market direction checks

    if event_hour == context.open_hours[0] and event_minute == context.first_check_minute:
        hour_open_price[0] = data[context.stock].close_price

    if event_hour == context.open_hours[0] and event_minute == context.second_check_minute:
        hour_close_price[0] = data[context.stock].close_price

    if hour_open_price[0] < hour_close_price[0]:
        context.is_bullish[0] = True

    if hour_open_price[0] > hour_close_price[0]:
        context.is_bullish[0] = False

    # Hour 2 market direction checks

    if event_hour == context.open_hours[1] and event_minute == context.first_check_minute:
        hour_open_price[1] = data[context.stock].close_price

    if event_hour == context.open_hours[1] and event_minute == context.second_check_minute:
        hour_close_price[1] = data[context.stock].close_price

    if hour_open_price[1] < hour_close_price[1]:
        context.is_bullish[1] = True

    if hour_open_price[1] > hour_close_price[1]:
        context.is_bullish[1] = False

    # Same block repeated with different numbers x24 (edited out to reduce size)


    # Make Trades? - I want to edit this to detect if context.is_bullish has 5 trues in a row without needing to manually make more if statements like the one already below

    if event_hour in context.open_hours and context.is_bullish[0] == True and context.is_bullish[1] == True and context.is_bullish[2] == True and context.is_bullish[3] == True and context.is_bullish[4] == True and position_open == False:
        order(context.stock,+1000)
        log.info('Buy Order Placed')
        position_open = True

    if event_hour in context.open_hours and context.is_bullish[0] == False and position_open == True:
        order(context.stock,-1000)
        log.info('Buy Position Closed')
        position_open = False
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Ned Batchelder, bensiu, Mark, Jan Dvorak, Marcus Ekwall Jan 6 '13 at 20:23

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
there is not enough information here. the title, description, and code don't even seem to match. –  Inbar Rose Jan 6 '13 at 17:01
    
Welcome to StackOverflow! Asking two questions within one is not a good idea. –  David Robinson Jan 6 '13 at 17:05
    
Don't ask two questions at once. If you have more than one question that you cannot solve by searching, make separate questions. –  8chan Jan 6 '13 at 17:05
    
sorry :P (I'm new) –  user1953134 Jan 6 '13 at 17:12
    
@user1953134: That's OK, you can edit your question (I recommend removing the second one) –  David Robinson Jan 6 '13 at 17:13

4 Answers 4

If you had a list l, you could use

('True' * 5) in ''.join(map(str, l))

In other words your function would be

def true_row(row):
    return ('True' * 5) in ''.join(map(str, row))

>>> def true_row(row):
...     return ('True' * 5) in ''.join(map(str, row))
... 
>>> true_row([False, True, True, True, True, False, False])
False
>>> true_row([True, True, True, True, True, False, False])
True
share|improve this answer

Use itertools.groupby, which groups sets of identical elements in a row:

import itertools
any(len(list(g)) >= 5 and k == True for k, g in itertools.groupby(lst))
share|improve this answer
1  
This is how I first thought to do it, but interestingly it seems to be much slower than the string approach (which is strange, since I thought it would be faster). –  arshajii Jan 6 '13 at 17:26
    
@A.R.S.: Interesting, and maybe not that surprising- join and index operations are very fast. Replacing len(list(g)) with sum(1 for _ in g) in my answer would speed it up. –  David Robinson Jan 6 '13 at 17:29
    
What are k and g? –  user1953134 Jan 6 '13 at 18:57

If I read your question correctly, you are only interested in the count of Boolean rather than consecutive True values. Also you are working on a List rather than any iterable. If that is the case, you can simply use count. I would suggest you convert the sequence to List to ensure, your result is consistent across any iterable

def true_row(row):
    return list(row).count(True) >= 5

As explained by OP, he needs 5 consecutive boolean affirmation, in which case, I would suggest a plain vanilla loop and count technique which has a short-circuit mechanism to quit searching whenever it encounter's 5 consecutive True's. And its 10 fold faster on a random sample of 1000 data I tested. I suspect you may have to iterate through thousands of stock data for a considerable duration, so this will come useful.

def true_row(row, length = 5):
    count = - length
    for e in row:
        if e:
            count += 1
        else:
            count = -length
        if not count:
            return True
    return False

Now the Speed Test

>>> seq = (choice([True, False]) for _ in xrange(1000))
>>> def David(seq):
    return any(len(list(g)) >= 5 and k == True for k, g in itertools.groupby(lst))

>>> def ARS(seq):
    return ('True' * 5) in ''.join(map(str, row))

>>> t_ab = timeit.Timer(stmt = "true_row(seq)", setup = "from __main__ import true_row, seq")
>>> t_david = timeit.Timer(stmt = "David(seq)", setup = "from __main__ import David, seq, itertools")
>>> t_ars = timeit.Timer(stmt = "ARS(seq)", setup = "from __main__ import ARS, seq")
>>> t_ab.timeit(number=1000000)
0.3180467774861455
>>> t_david.timeit(number=1000000)
10.293826538349393
>>> t_ars.timeit(number=1000000)
4.2967059784193395

Even for smaller sequence where it has to iterate over the entire sequence, this is faster

>>> seq = (choice([True, False]) for _ in xrange(10))
>>> true_row(seq)
False
>>> t_ab = timeit.Timer(stmt = "true_row(seq)", setup = "from __main__ import true_row, seq")
>>> t_david = timeit.Timer(stmt = "David(seq)", setup = "from __main__ import David, seq, itertools")
>>> t_ars = timeit.Timer(stmt = "ARS(seq)", setup = "from __main__ import ARS, seq")
>>> t_ab.timeit(number=1000000)
0.32354575678039055
>>> t_david.timeit(number=1000000)
10.270037445319304
>>> t_ars.timeit(number=1000000)
3.7353719451734833
share|improve this answer
    
He wants to determine if there are 5 consecutive trues. –  arshajii Jan 6 '13 at 17:43
    
@A.R.S.: Hmmm in that case, I may be interpreting it incorrectly. I will leave my answer as of now, until user comes back with a clear written question explaining what he exactly wants. –  Abhijit Jan 6 '13 at 17:49
    
Yes, A.R.S. is right. I'm using it to detect if a stock value has went up 5 hours in a row, as a determinant of whether the stock price is bullish and so whether my algorithm should place an order to buy the stock. –  user1953134 Jan 6 '13 at 17:50

Here is an answer designed for simplicity

def five_true(L):
    for i in range(len(L) - 5):
        if L[i:i + 5] == [True] * 5:
            return True
    return False
share|improve this answer

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