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I have the following java bit

if(board[i][col].equals(true))
    return false

However, when I compile it I get the following error - "int cannot be dereferenced" - can anybody please explan what this means?

Thanks!

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9  
Show us the declaration of board[i][col] –  MrSmith42 Jan 6 '13 at 17:03
    

5 Answers 5

It is probably an array of primitive types (int?).

Use ==, it'll be fine. But if it's int, make sure you're not comparing it to true: Java is strong typed.

You use equals when you want to test for equality two distinct objects.

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Indeed, I think that may very well be the case... Sorry, I'm new to Java and used to less strict languages :) Thanks for your help! –  max0005 Jan 6 '13 at 17:05
    
Hm ok this, is weird, the array is declared as: boolean[][] chessboard; chessboard = new boolean[rows][cols]; And retrieved as: boolean[][] board = initiate.getChessboard(); But I still get the same error... –  max0005 Jan 6 '13 at 17:08
1  
Please show the code. –  gd1 Jan 6 '13 at 17:09
    // Assuming
    int[][] board = new int[ROWS][COLS];

    // In other languages, such as C and C++, an integer != 0 evaluates to true
    // if(board[i][col]) //this wont work, because Java is strongly typed.

    // You'd need to do an explicit comparison, which evaluates to a boolean
    // for the same behavior.
    // Primitives don't have methods and need none for direct comparison:
    if (board[i][col] != 0)
        return false;

    // If you expect the value of true to be 1:
    if (board[i][col] == 1)
        return false;

    // Assuming
    boolean[][] board = new boolean[ROWS][COLS];

    if (board[i][col] == true)
        return false;

    // short:
    if (board[i][col])
        return false;

    // in contrast
    if (board[i][col] == false)
        return false;

    // should be done using the logical complement operator (NOT)
    if (!board[i][col])
        return false;
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Ok, this fixed it, thank you very much :) –  max0005 Jan 6 '13 at 17:15
    
You're welcome! –  Sam Jan 6 '13 at 17:17
3  
if(board[i][col] == true) ==> if(board[i][col]) is more standard and readable. –  assylias Jan 6 '13 at 17:17
    
It's about the comparison, but that is indeed how one should do that. Fixed. –  Sam Jan 6 '13 at 17:19

With the following declaration:

boolean[][] board = initiate.getChessboard();

You need to use the following condition:

if(board[i][col] == true)
    return false;

Which could also be written:

if(board[i][col])
    return false;

This is because equals only applies to objects and boolean is not an object, it is a primitive type.

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if(board[i][col])
    return false

If the array as boolean[][] comparison is made with ==. And comparing == true can also be left out.

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If board is an array of boolean primitives, use

if(board[i][col] == true)
  return false;

or

if (board[i][col]) return false;

or

return !board[i][col];
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