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According to the C reference the qsort function provided in the standard library has the form

void 
qsort ( void * base, size_t num, size_t size, int ( * compar ) ( const void *, const void * ) );

My question is why the compar function has to have arguments in the form const void * and what does it mean by const void *

Another question is if a function takes an argument of the form const void *, can it change the value that is pointed by this pointer?

Example:

static int double_a_number(const void * val){
    *(int *)val = *(int *)val * 2;
    return 0;
}

Will this really double the variable val?

Thanks for help!

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For the second question, can't you just type it in and find out? –  Pointy Jan 6 '13 at 17:47
    
For the second question: yes, provided with call it with the address of a int object. –  pmg Jan 6 '13 at 17:48
    
@Pointy Well it could work in most cases due to undefined behavior. Ins some cases it's just better to know if it'll work always instead of just "in this case". –  RedX Jan 6 '13 at 17:49
3  
@Pointy Programming by experimentation ("finding out") is always a bad idea. Especially with C, where many properties are implementation defined, unspecified or undefined. Look ma, printf prints "(null)" when I pass it a null pointer! That's a guarantee for a surprise on the next implementation. –  Jens Jan 6 '13 at 18:03
1  
This question is two questions. As those two question do not necessarily rely one on another, you might better have posted two questions. –  alk Jan 6 '13 at 18:07
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1 Answer

why the compar function has to have arguments in the form const void *

Because that's the most general type available in C. Remember that qsort can be used to sort arrays of any type.

Another question is if a function takes an argument of the form const void *, can it change the value that is pointed by this pointer?

Not without casting away the const. And this is usually a bad idea (it would certainly be unexpected, and it may also lead to undefined behaviour or crashes). And it certainly makes no sense in a comparator function!

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1  
Is it not also a gentle reminder that a comparator should not mutate the objects which are being compared? –  us2012 Jan 6 '13 at 17:48
    
But actually I tried out the second one and the odd thing is it really changed the value pointed by val. Why this happened? –  dorafmon Jan 6 '13 at 18:02
    
@dorafmon: Casting away the const and modifying the underlying object is valid if the underlying object isn't really const. But again, it's unexpected (i.e. surprising to users of your function)! –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 6 '13 at 18:08
    
@OliCharlesworth Thanks, I think I got the idea. –  dorafmon Jan 6 '13 at 18:10
    
And it's entirely possible that if something is passed as const to a function, the compiler relies on you not lying about this, and thus will not re-load the value after the function call -> unexpected effects in the qsort function itself. Why any sane person would write a compare function that alters the value is beyond me... –  Mats Petersson Jan 6 '13 at 20:21
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