Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Have such function:

   private static void EncodeString(ref string str)
    {
        using (RLE inst_rle = new RLE())
        {
            string str_encoded = inst_rle.Encode(ref str);
            Console.WriteLine(

              "\r\nBase string ({0} chars): {1}\r\nAfter RLE-encoding ({2} chars): {3}\r\nCompression percentage: %{4}",
              str.Length, str, str_encoded.Length, str_encoded,
              () => { (100 * (str.Length - str.encoded.Length) / str.Length); }

                             );
        }
    }

As I remember it's a style of lambdas in C#: () => { < action > ; }

But getting such errors:

  • Cannot convert lambda expression to type 'object' because it
  • Only assignment, call, increment, decrement, and new object expressions can be used as a statement
  • Cannot use ref or out parameter 'str' inside an anonymous method, lambda expression, or query expression
  • Cannot use ref or out parameter 'str' inside an anonymous method, lambda expression, or query expression

How to use Lambda in C# EXACLTY in my app (console app) without explicity using

Delegate / Func< T >, like in () => { } way?

share|improve this question
1  
FYI, I don't think any of the answers have picked up that you can't use your str parameter in any of the lambdas. As str is marked with ref, you can't use it in the lambda. You would have to store it as a local temporary variable first before using in the lambda. As Lee pointed out though, I see no reason to be using a lambda at all in this case anyway. –  Chris Sinclair Jan 6 '13 at 18:37
    
@ChrisSinclair Doesn't exist any perversion to use references with lambdas? –  Oleg Orlov Jan 6 '13 at 19:21
    
Sorry, I don't understand what you mean, Oleg. Can you rephrase your question please? –  Chris Sinclair Jan 6 '13 at 20:28
    
@ChrisSinclair I mean this: stackoverflow.com/questions/14185982/… –  Oleg Orlov Jan 6 '13 at 20:31

3 Answers 3

I'm not really sure why you want to use a lambda here, it looks like you want:

Console.WriteLine(@"\r\nBase string ({0} chars): {1}\r\nAfter RLE-encoding
            (
             {2} chars): {3}\r\nCompression percentage: {4}",
             str.Length, str, str_encoded.Length, str_encoded,
             (100 / str.Length) * (str.Length / str_encoded.Length)
            );

As the comment points out, you need to prefix the format string with an @ since it spans multiple lines.

share|improve this answer
    
I think we'll also need to use the @ prefix on the format string since it appears to be a multi-line string. –  Chris Sinclair Jan 6 '13 at 18:06
    
@lee, @ screening is needed only if you have two (\) slashes in string or (\") –  Oleg Orlov Jan 6 '13 at 18:16
    
@OlegOrlov I'm not sure I understand your last comment... You are talking about verbatim strings, right? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa691090%28VS.71%29.aspx If your string is multi-line (in the souce code file, not because of \r\n escapes), you need the @ prefix. –  Chris Sinclair Jan 6 '13 at 18:28
    
@weston Good point, knew something was itching at the back of my head about mixing those two. –  Chris Sinclair Jan 6 '13 at 18:33
    
Never knew this. However, this breaks his \r\n as `\` is no longer the start of an escape sequence. –  weston Jan 6 '13 at 18:35

I agree with Lee, but when you really want to create a Lamba like this, and get its output you need to cast explicitly something like:

(Func<int>)(() => (100 / str.Length) * (str.Length / str_encoded.Length)))();

I do this when I am playing with threads, not in production code though

share|improve this answer
    
Please correct your brackets. They are so many... And i assume, if you use lambda statement you must have return in your lambda. –  Hamlet Hakobyan Jan 6 '13 at 18:26
    
@HamletHakobyan thanks, had some misplaced. I corrected the code. –  MBen Jan 6 '13 at 18:28
    
@HamletHakobyan You do not need a return in the lambda; it is implied if the lambda has an expression that results in a value and is assigned to a delegate that indicates a return value (such as Func<int>) –  Chris Sinclair Jan 6 '13 at 18:29
    
In lambda expression not, but before correction there was lambda statement. –  Hamlet Hakobyan Jan 6 '13 at 18:33
    
@HamletHakobyan Ahh yeah, I see that in the edits; good pick up. –  Chris Sinclair Jan 6 '13 at 18:34

String constants can be defined over multiple code lines with a @ prefix, but then your \r\n will not work. So instead you can add string framgents together with + to achieve the same effect:

private static void EncodeString(ref string str)
{
    using (RLE inst_rle = new RLE())
    {
        string str_encoded = inst_rle.Encode(ref str);
        Console.WriteLine("\r\nBase string ({0} chars): {1}\r\nAfter RLE-encoding" +
        "(" +
         "{2} chars): {3}\r\nCompression percentage: {4}",
         str.Length, str, str_encoded.Length, str_encoded,
         () => { (100 / str.Length) * (str.Length / str_encoded.Length);}
        );
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.