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The following C++11 code does not compile:

struct T {};

void f(T&&) { }

void g(T&& t) { f(t); }

int main()
{
    g(T());
}

The correct way to do this is:

void g(T&& t) { f(move(t)); }

This is very difficult to explain in the correct natural language terminology. The parameter t seems to lose its "&&" status which it needs to have reinstated with the std::move.

What do you call the T() in g(T()) ?

What do you call the T&& in g(T&& t) ?

What do you call the t in g(T&& t) ?

What do you call the t in f(t) and f(move(t)) ?

What do you call the return value of move(t)?

What do you call the overall effect?

Which section(s) of the standard deal with this issue?

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6  
@Nawaz: huh, what? –  jalf Jan 6 '13 at 18:17
3  
@jalf: I think he's complaining I used T as a struct name and not a template parameter, thus he incorrectly thought forward was more appropriate than move. –  Andrew Tomazos Jan 6 '13 at 18:18
6  
@AndrewTomazosFathomlingCorps: maybe, and I agree the name might be ambiguous... but downvoting still feels childish. –  Matthieu M. Jan 6 '13 at 18:30
1  
I've actually seen T&& parameters referred to as "universal references" since you can pass anything to them, which clears up that T&& is not itself an rvalue. –  Mooing Duck Jan 6 '13 at 19:09
1  
@MooingDuck: In this example T is a concrete struct type, not a template parameter, and as such is not subject to type deduction, and therefore T&& in this example is not a "universal reference" as coined by Myers. (You have made a "Nawaz", see previous comments.) –  Andrew Tomazos Jan 6 '13 at 19:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The key point is that a parameter T&& b can only bind to an rvalue, but when referred to later the expression b is an lvalue.

So the argument to the function must be an rvalue, but inside the function body the parameter is an lvalue because by then you've bound a reference to it and given it a name and it's no longer an unnamed temporary.

An expression has a type (e.g. int, string etc.) and it has a value category (e.g. lvalue or rvalue) and these two things are distinct.

A named variable which is declared as T&& b has type "rvalue reference to T" and can only be bound to an rvalue, but when you later use that reference the expression b has value category "lvalue", because it has a name and refers to some object (whatever the reference is bound to, even though that was an rvalue.) This means to pass b to another function which takes an rvalue you can't just say f(b) because b is an lvalue, so you must convert it (back) to an rvalue, via std::move(b).

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So how do you describe the difference between a parameter T& a and a parameter T&& b? Is a an lvalue, rvalue, lvalue reference, rvalue reference or several of the above? Likewise is b an lvalue, rvalue, lvalue reference, rvalue reference or several of the above? If your answer is the same for both questions than in natural language what is the difference between a and b? –  Andrew Tomazos Jan 6 '13 at 18:26
1  
@AndrewTomazosFathomlingCorps: The key point, I think, is that an r-value reference is itself an l-value. So, a would be an l-value AND a reference and b would be an l-value AND a r-value reference (ie, reference to an r-value). –  Matthieu M. Jan 6 '13 at 18:32
1  
The type of a is "lvalue-reference to T", and its value category is "lvalue". The type of b is "rvalue-reference to T", and its value category is also "lvalue". An expression's value category is a separate thing to its type. –  Jonathan Wakely Jan 6 '13 at 18:33
    
Ok, so each expression has two distinct characteristics: a type and a value category. –  Andrew Tomazos Jan 6 '13 at 18:38
1  
In 3.10 [basic.lval] Figure 1 is Expression category taxonomy, the following page or two explains it I think –  Andrew Tomazos Jan 6 '13 at 18:41

All parameters are lvalues, even if their type is "rvalue reference". They have names, so you can refer to them as often as you want. If named rvalue references were rvalues, you would get surprising behavior. We do not want implicit moves from lvalues, that's why you have to explicitly write std::move.

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What do you call the T() in g(T()) ?

A temporary (which is movable).

What do you call the T&& in g(T&& t) ?

T&& is an r-value reference and represent an object that can be moved.

What do you call the t in g(T&& t) ?

t is actually an l-value since you can refer to it by name.

What do you call the t in f(t) and f(move(t)) ?

  1. l-value
  2. l-value being converted into an r-value reference when returned by move()

What do you call the return value of move(t)?

An r-value reference

As a note; you should maybe call the struct C, and write a separate example where T is actually templetized. The code needs to be different then, because in a function template< typename T > void f( T&& t ); you cannot simply use std::move() without being very careful, since T can actually be a const&, in which case you must not use std::move() but instead use perfect forwarding with std::forward< T >( t )

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1  
To be even more precise, every call of std::move is an xvalue. –  FredOverflow Jan 6 '13 at 18:18

What do you call the T() in g(T()) ?

That is a temporary object and an r-value.

What do you call the T&& in g(T&& t) ?

You call that a r-value reference.

The reason why

void g(T&& t) { f(t); }

doesn't work is because an r-value reference can't bind to a named object (even if that named object happens to be another r-value reference).

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The parameter t does not lose its "status". Simply, the parameter t is an lvalue, even though it is an rvalue reference. Keep in mind that lvalueness and rvalueness are orthogonal concepts and apply to values as to value references (including rvalue references). Thus, an rvalue reference can be either an lvalue or an rvalue. If it has a name, as in your example, it is an lvalue. This makes the type system orthogonal and it is a good feature IMHO.

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Do you really mean "lvalueness and rvalueness are orthogonal concepts to types"? Otherwise it reads as though you're saying lvalueness is orthogonal to rvalueness, which I don't think is what you mean. But then I don't understand what you mean by "This makes the type system orthogonal" either so maybe I've just misunderstood the whole answer. –  Jonathan Wakely Jan 6 '13 at 18:37
    
@JonathanWakely: Yes, I meant to say they are orthogonal to types. What I meant to say is: an object can have type "rvalue reference to something" and still be an lvalue reference (if it has a name), and that the criteria that classify an object as an rvalue or an lvalue are orthogonal to the ones that classify it as an instance of a certain type (e.g. "rvalue reference to something"). I hope i didn't make it just more confusing. –  Andy Prowl Jan 6 '13 at 19:11
    
No, that makes it much clearer for me now, have an upvote –  Jonathan Wakely Jan 6 '13 at 19:12

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