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I have a question regarding C++ virtual functions. Virtual function has been used in order to notify that in sub-class implementation of that function from sub-class to sub-class may differ.

I don't get it a bit. When you define interface in C++ it is not like in Java as far as I can see by now. In fact I don't understand what interface in C++ is. You define virtual function at the header file. Then sub-classes of base class can override it in any way you want as long it is a virtual function. Is the interface in C++ a header file? Cheers

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2  
Technically there is no "interface" in C++ :) –  fasked Jan 6 '13 at 19:12
    
C++ has no interface. Actually it is just pure abstract class. –  Alex G.P. Jan 6 '13 at 19:14
    
It's best not to try to force concepts alien to the C++ language into it. "Interface" is such a concept. See answer stackoverflow.com/questions/14185707/…. By the way, "interface" is also not a concept of the classical OO language Eiffel. –  Daniel Daranas Jan 6 '13 at 19:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Interface in Java is a particular language construct. The way that the word interface is used in C++ is not really the same concept since it has to do with the parameter types of a class or function or method. In Java the interface key word indicates that a class provides a set of services described by the interface class specified and a class may implement multiple different interfaces. So think of it as a kind of contract between the class implementing the interface and any objects that are using objects instantiated from the class. A class can also actually provide several different related services each of which has a particular interface.

One can do something similar to the Java interface concept by using pure virtual methods in a class description.

What a virtual method does is to provide a mechanism so that objects using derived classes of the class can depend on a particular interface while leaving the details of the implementation to the derived class. So this is similar to the Java interface. C++ virtual methods is a way to provide a way to implement a Java interface using a compiled and static checked approach rather than a run time approach.

With a virtual method you create a super class type that can be used to create pointer variables that can be assigned variables from the derived types and when you use the virtual method, the correct method from the derived class will be called. Figuring out which method to call is done at compile time not run time. The major idea for C++ is to be as efficient as C while providing object oriented language constructs along with static type checking at compile time to reduce reliance on error detect at run time with its additional overhead.

class Joe {
public:
virtual int thingOne() { return 1;}  // standard, not pure virtual method
..
};

class JoeTwo : public Joe {
public:
int thingOne() { return 2;}   // derived class provides its own version of the method
..
};

Joe *myJoe = new JoeTwo;

int i = myJoe->thingOne();  // value of 2 put into i and not value of 1

With C++ you do need to recognize the difference between an object and a pointer to an object because of object slicing which can happen when a variable containing a derived object is assigned to a variable containing the derived object's super class. This "object slicing" will happen because the derived object does not fit into the base class or super class object from which it is derived. The derived object has additional stuff the super class object does not have so with the assignment (default assignment is straight memory copy) only the super class part of the derived object is copied into the super class object.

class Joe {
public:
virtual int thingOne() { return 1;}  // standard, not pure virtual method
..
};

class JoeTwo : public Joe {
public:
int thingOne() { return 2;}   // derived class provides its own version of the method
..
};

Joe *myJoe = new JoeTwo;    // no object slicing since this is pointer
JoeTwo myJoeTwo;
Joe  myJoeSliced = myJoeTwo;  // JoeTwo object myJoeTwo sliced to fit into Joe object myJoeSliced
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The main difference between Java and C++ is the fact that in Java every function is virtual.

Historically when C++ have been developed the fact of placing an abastraction layer between every function call (that is what happens using a virtual method table) wasn't something you did want for every method call because a virtual method invocation is slower.

So what happens is that you must specify that a method must be called through dynamic binding, otherwise the method is chosen during compile time according to the declaration of the variable. This means that if you declare Base *b = new Derived() and you call a method on b which is not virtual then method is chosen at compile time and it will be a Base::method.

The motto is you don't pay for what you don't use and that's it.

Interfaces in C++ doesn't exist, but you can have a class with just pure virtual functions which behave basically in the same way. Actually you can have two kind of virtual methods:

class Base {
  virtual void method() {
    //implementation
  }
  virtual void pureMethod() = 0;
}

First method() is virtual and obeys to dynamic binding but it is implemented even in Base class while pureMethod() still obeys to dynamic binding but it's declared as pure virtual so it doesn't have any implementation, thus Base cannot be instantiated as it is and you need to subclass it and override at least the pure virtual method.

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C++ has no interfaces like Java does. The closest you get is when you define a class that only has pure virtual functions, so that everyone deriving from that class is forced to implement all of them.

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virtual functions also bring "Dynamic Binding" in the C++ world which is something that you need to take into account if you want to study the behaviour of your program. –  user1849534 Jan 6 '13 at 19:18

A virtual method in C++ is a method that can be overridden. A pure virtual method (defined like virtual foo() = 0) is an abstract method. To create an interface like the ones you use in Java, you simply specify that all methods are pure virtual (abstract).

However, sometimes the "interface" is refering to the public members and types of a class that is usually completelly inside the header.

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Nonvirtual method also can be overridden. –  TT_ Jan 28 at 22:09

The interface of a c++ class is defined in the header file. Virtual functions are only used if you want to subclass and use inheritance.

The closest you get to a java like interface in c++ is when you use a pure abstract class. Implementing classes having this interface have to subclass this abstract class.

Don't forget to make your deconstructor virtual or the subclasses's deconstructor will not be called when referencing the base class.

example:

class PuppetInterface
{
public:

    virtual ~PuppetInterface() {};

    virtual void walk() = 0;

    virtual void tellALie() = 0;
};

class Pinocchio : public PuppetInterface
{
public:

    ~Pinocchio()
    {
        //lie down look dead.
    }

    void walk()
    {
        //try moving wooden legs.
    }

    void tellALie()
    {
        //let nose grow look serious.
    }
};

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    PuppetInterface* pinocchio = new Pinocchio();
    pinocchio->walk();
    pinocchio->tellALie();

    delete pinocchio;

    return 0;
}

Edit: Since raw pointers are bad, not exception save, likely to leak etc. The above code should be rewritten as

//using c++ 11
int main(int argc, const char * argv[])  
{
    auto pinocchio = std::unique_ptr<PuppetInterface>(new Pinocchio());
    pinocchio->walk();
    pinocchio->tellALie();  
 }
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1  
I intensely dislike the use of pointers here. This is a culture that should never have existed. If C++ were taught properly nobody would even think of using a pointer here. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 6 '13 at 19:52
    
Yes i agree, the proper way would probably be to use std::unique_ptr here - then it will even be exception safe. –  mgr Jan 6 '13 at 20:09
    
No the proper way here would be without pointers. Well actually polymorphism never makes sense with local variables anyway but if you want to demonstrate it, bind to a (const) reference. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 6 '13 at 20:10
    
Thanks for your example code, it uses C++11 features 'auto' and 'std::unique_ptr', I've never coded like this before. Great! –  Brent81 Jun 22 '13 at 21:16

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