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I have a data frame in R. Let's say it is stock price.

[1] "Date"      "Open"      "High"      "Low"       "Close"     "Volume"   
[7] "Adj.Close"
10   2012-12-20 54.53 54.61 53.70 54.21   4898900     54.21
9    2012-12-21 53.05 53.69 52.59 53.60  11076800     53.60
8    2012-12-24 53.37 54.00 53.33 53.69   1702900     53.69
7    2012-12-26 53.62 53.79 52.88 53.13   3047100     53.13
6    2012-12-27 53.09 53.64 52.71 53.24   4583600     53.24
5    2012-12-28 52.98 53.27 52.62 52.64   3395700     52.64
4    2012-12-31 52.41 53.67 52.39 53.63   4623500     53.63
3    2013-01-02 54.59 55.00 54.26 55.00   6633800     55.00
2    2013-01-03 55.07 55.61 55.00 55.37   7335200     55.37
1    2013-01-04 55.53 56.00 55.31 55.69   5455700     55.69

Something like the above. Now I need to find out the rows which are the last day in each year. How can I do that?

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can extract 'grouping variables' from the date, say year and month, and then use aggregation functions on the different values. That would be doing it by hand.

Or you can use the xts package which already has operators for this:

R> library(quantmod)                             ## for getSymbols()
R> SPY <- getSymbols("SPY", auto.assign=FALSE)   ## SPY is now of class xts

We can look at the data

R> summary(SPY)
     Index               SPY.Open      SPY.High      SPY.Low     
 Min.   :2007-01-03   Min.   : 68   Min.   : 70   Min.   : 67.1  
 1st Qu.:2008-07-03   1st Qu.:111   1st Qu.:112   1st Qu.:110.0  
 Median :2010-01-04   Median :128   Median :129   Median :127.5  
 Mean   :2010-01-02   Mean   :124   Mean   :125   Mean   :123.0  
 3rd Qu.:2011-07-05   3rd Qu.:140   3rd Qu.:140   3rd Qu.:139.0  
 Max.   :2013-01-04   Max.   :157   Max.   :158   Max.   :155.4  
   SPY.Close       SPY.Volume        SPY.Adjusted  
 Min.   : 68.1   Min.   :3.87e+07   Min.   : 62.6  
 1st Qu.:110.8   1st Qu.:1.38e+08   1st Qu.:104.1  
 Median :128.4   Median :1.86e+08   Median :121.1  
 Mean   :124.0   Mean   :2.12e+08   Mean   :116.1  
 3rd Qu.:139.7   3rd Qu.:2.57e+08   3rd Qu.:130.0  
 Max.   :156.5   Max.   :8.71e+08   Max.   :146.4  

R> 

And run our desired computation:

R> tail(SPY[ endpoints(SPY) ])
           SPY.Open SPY.High SPY.Low SPY.Close SPY.Volume
2012-08-31   141.29   141.82  140.36    141.16  151970400
2012-09-28   144.09   144.56  143.46    143.97  150696100
2012-10-31   141.85   142.03  140.68    141.35  103438500
2012-11-30   142.14   142.42  141.66    142.15  136568300
2012-12-31   139.66   142.56  139.54    142.41  243935200
2013-01-04   145.97   146.61  145.67    146.37  116790800
           SPY.Adjusted
2012-08-31       139.42
2012-09-28       142.96
2012-10-31       140.35
2012-11-30       141.15
2012-12-31       142.41
2013-01-04       146.37

Here endpoints() is the function you want, it defaults on picking months. It finds us the row indices we want. So here it is for years:

R> SPY[ endpoints(SPY, "years") ]
           SPY.Open SPY.High SPY.Low SPY.Close SPY.Volume
2007-12-31   147.10   147.61  146.06    146.21  108126800
2008-12-31    89.08    90.97   88.87     90.24  193987200
2009-12-31   112.77   112.80  111.39    111.44   90637900
2010-12-31   125.53   125.87  125.33    125.75   91218900
2011-12-30   126.02   126.33  125.50    125.50   95599000
2012-12-31   139.66   142.56  139.54    142.41  243935200
2013-01-04   145.97   146.61  145.67    146.37  116790800
           SPY.Adjusted
2007-12-31       131.14
2008-12-31        82.88
2009-12-31       104.73
2010-12-31       120.49
2011-12-30       122.78
2012-12-31       142.41
2013-01-04       146.37
R> 
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Thanks for catching that, Josh. I added that to the post. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Jan 6 '13 at 20:00
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A base solution:

Get some test data:

test <- read.table(textConnection("Date      Open      High      Low  Close Volume Adj.Close
2012-12-28 52.98 53.27 52.62 52.64   3395700     52.64
2012-12-31 52.41 53.67 52.39 53.63   4623500     53.63
2013-01-03 55.07 55.61 55.00 55.37   7335200     55.37
2013-01-04 55.53 56.00 55.31 55.69   5455700     55.69"),header=TRUE)

Change the Date column to an actual Date:

test$Date <- as.Date(test$Date)

Get the rows corresponding to the max dates within each year:

do.call(
         rbind,
         by(test,format(test$Date,"%Y"),function(x) x[x$Date == max(x$Date),])
       )

           Date  Open  High   Low Close  Volume Adj.Close
2012 2012-12-31 52.41 53.67 52.39 53.63 4623500     53.63
2013 2013-01-04 55.53 56.00 55.31 55.69 5455700     55.69
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Using the "test" dataset from @thelatemail, here's another--not one, but two--base R approaches:

  1. ave() + cut.Date() + basic subsetting:

    test[test$Date == ave(test$Date, cut(test$Date, "1 year"), FUN = max), ]
    #         Date  Open  High   Low Close  Volume Adj.Close
    # 2 2012-12-31 52.41 53.67 52.39 53.63 4623500     53.63
    # 4 2013-01-04 55.53 56.00 55.31 55.69 5455700     55.69
    
  2. sapply() + split() + cut.Date(). I don't like it so much that you have to transpose the output. I guess you could also do lapply() instead of sapply(), and then use do.call(rbind...) to get the data.frame.

    t(sapply(split(test, cut(test$Date, "1 year")), 
             function(x) x[which.max(x[["Date"]]),]))
    #            Date  Open  High  Low   Close Volume  Adj.Close
    # 2012-01-01 15705 52.41 53.67 52.39 53.63 4623500 53.63    
    # 2013-01-01 15709 55.53 56    55.31 55.69 5455700 55.69
    
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You can also extract the info with the basic R package:

#Get the years from the dataset
years=unique(format(dataset$Date, "%Y"))
#Get the last day values for each year
values=list()
for (y in 1:length(years)){
    values[[y]]=dataset[dataset$Date==max(dataset$Date[format(dataset$Date, "%Y")==years[y]]),]
}
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I love answers with basic R, but this one only gets you one year. The data may span several years. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Jan 6 '13 at 22:41
    
The idea was to give a path for a anwser without using other packages, but i have updated the anwser with the complete solution. however @thelatemail already gave one anwser with very colse to this one. –  A.R Jan 7 '13 at 10:17
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