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I need to instantiate a subclass from the superclass.

class Superclass(object):
    @staticmethod
    def get_instance():
        #This should return an instance of subclass1 or subclass2

class Subclass1(Superclass):
    pass
class Subclass2(Superclass):
    pass

I want to write:

Subclass1.get_instance()

and obtain an instance of Subclass1, and same for Subclass2

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2  
If you're okay with accessing this via Subclass1, why don't you just do Subclass1() and instantiate it the normal way? –  BrenBarn Jan 6 '13 at 19:56
    
By the same token, why do you want to do this? –  Matthew Adams Jan 6 '13 at 19:57
    
Are you trying to implement the Singleton pattern? –  Bakuriu Jan 6 '13 at 19:58
4  
It is a very bad idea to make superclass know anything about subclasses –  Jakub M. Jan 6 '13 at 20:02
    
I do have a reason for wanting to do it but it's a bit complicated, am not trying to implement a singleton. –  LtWorf Jan 6 '13 at 20:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

use @classmethod instead of @staticmethod :

class Superclass(object):
    @classmethod
    def get_instance(cls):
        #This should return an instance of subclass1 or subclass2
        return cls()

class Subclass1(Superclass):
    pass
class Subclass2(Superclass):
    pass
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If you want to access the list of subclasses of a given class you can use the __subclasses__ method:

>>> class MyClass(object):
...     pass
... 
>>> class Subclass1(MyClass):
...     pass
... 
>>> class Subclass2(MyClass):
...     pass
... 
>>> MyClass.__subclasses__()
[<class '__main__.Subclass1'>, <class '__main__.Subclass2'>]

If you already know the existing subclasses you can simply instantiate them directly:

>>> class MyClass(object):
...     def getInstance(self):
...             return Subclass1()
... 
>>> class Subclass1(MyClass): pass
... 
>>> MyClass().getInstance()
<__main__.Subclass1 object at 0x1e72d10>

Anyway, I guess that you are trying to implement the Singleton pattern, in which case I think you should not use a getInstance method at all. Just implement it using:

  • a module, since modules are singletons
  • Reimplementing __new__ to return the old instance, if an instance already exist
  • Using some metaclass

And there are a lot more ways of doing this.

If this is not your aim, then maybe you ought to change design because super-class usually do not have to know about subclasses.

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No singleton, I am trying to avoid reimplementing a static function in the subclasses that would be identical except for the instance used. –  LtWorf Jan 6 '13 at 22:48

The correct way to do this, if you cannot just call selfclass() in a classmethod, is to define (or assume) a factory method, and have your superclass method call that factory method on self:

class Mixinator(object):

      @classmethod # this is not really necessary, but it means you don't need an instance to start with
      def factoryuser(selfclass, *args):
          return selfclass.factory(*args)


      #only define factory if you want Mixinator to be usable on its own
      @classmethod
      def factory(selfclass, *args):
          return selfclass(*args)  # this is a stub.

Obviously, child classes should need to have something more involved in their factory to make this worthwhile. I'm not sure there's any use-case that can't be solved by replacing factory with an appropriate __new__, but this is more explicit.

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