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In the main function below, I am calling circleArea() and telling it I want to use the argument circleRadius.

After that, in the circleArea() function declaration, I am changing the name of the argument to theRadius.

From what I understand, since I declared an argument when I called the function, when I declare the function, it knows which value I want to use in the function, and I can give it a different name. Is that true?

And if it is, what happens when I want to use more than one argument in the function?

int main()
{    
    float pictureWidth, pictureHeight, pictureSurfaceArea,
    circleRadius, circleSurfaceArea; // [4.4]
    pictureWidth = 8.0;
    pictureHeight = 4.5;
    circleRadius = 5.0; // [4.7]

    pictureSurfaceArea = pictureWidth * pictureHeight;

    // Here we call our function
    circleSurfaceArea = circleArea(circleRadius); 
}

float circleArea(float theRadius) // [5.1]
{
    float theArea;
    theArea = 3.1416 * theRadius * theRadius; // pi times r square [5.4]
    return theArea;
}
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Yes, the value is passed to the function, where it is free to call the argument whatever it wants. Remember, local variables and arguments have local scope. The same name somewhere else can refer to something else altogether. –  Jonathon Reinhart Jan 6 '13 at 21:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, you are right. The local name of the variable inside a function can be whatever name you want, what is relevant is

  • the type of the parameter which must correspond when you are calling the function
  • the position (if it's the first, second, whatever)

Actually, once your code is compiled the resulting binary doesn't have any name at all for your parameters. This is legal:

void method(int a, int b);

int main()
{
  int z,x,y;

  method(x,y);
  method(z,y);
}

void method(int a, int b) {
  //
}

The scope of the parameter is the same of every local variable of a function and it is valid just inside that function.

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1  
since this is still C, the function should be declared before the call site, to get type warnings and conversions. –  Chris Jan 6 '13 at 21:57
    
so if i wanted to add an argument to circleArea when calling it, for example circleArea(circleRadius, picturRadius); then when i go to declare this function i will need to make sure the local variable i will give for picturRadius will be second, like this float circleArea(float theRadius, float picRadius) ? –  JohnBigs Jan 6 '13 at 22:19
int main()
{    
   float pictureWidth, pictureHeight, pictureSurfaceArea,
   circleRadius, circleSurfaceArea; // [4.4]
   pictureWidth = 8.0;
   pictureHeight = 4.5;
   circleRadius = 5.0; // [4.7]

   pictureSurfaceArea = pictureWidth * pictureHeight;

   // Here we call our function
  circleSurfaceArea = circleArea(circleRadius); 
}

float circleArea(float theRadius) // [5.1]
{
   float theArea;
   theArea = 3.1416 * theRadius * theRadius; // pi times r square [5.4]
   return theArea;
}

In the above code, in main function you are just passing the value of circleRadius[actual argument], so this value will be copied to the formal argument[theRadius], here nothing to do with the name of arguments, you can take same name for the formal argument . in more than one argument also nothing to do with arguments name only it will take values of arguments and calculate and return the result. but the thing you need to concentrate while passing arguments is you should declare "data type" of formal arguments same as actual argument .

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Function prototype consists of function name and the list of it's parameter types, not names. I.e. compiler does not "see" parameter names. When compiler see your call

circleSurfaceArea = circleArea(circleRadius)

it sees that you call function circleArea(float) since circleRadius is float. This matches your definition, so compiler binds the call with the definition. The names of parameters do not matter.

This is made for your comfort since it is often suitable to name parameters inside function body differently than in function call (here parameters are named "arguments"). This is the form of encapsulation which was not present in some old languages like here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GOSUB

Encapsulation helps to separate function usage and function implementation.

If you want more than 1 parameter, then declare and define them more. Again compiler will not see the names, only types.

My answers are about C not objective-C. May be it is a coincidence here.

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in the circleArea() function declaration we are changing the name of the argument to theRadius [...] since we declared an argument when we called the function, so when we declaring the function it knows which value we want to use in the function, and we can give it a different name.

I'm not sure what you mean by that... The name of an argument only matters when inside the implementation (or "body") of the function. The function body refers to its arguments using the names of the arguments. It doesn't matter what's the name of the variable you're passing in when you're calling (as opposed to defining) the function. It may not even have a name, since you can pass any expression, circleSurfaceArea = circleArea(1.0); would be fine as well, in this case the argument doesn't even "have a name" (huh, hard to explain using correct terminology).

what happened when i want to use more than 1 argument in the function?

Then you separate the arguments using commas:

float rectangleArea(float a, float b);
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Thank you for the answer and for correcting my question @H2CO3 –  JohnBigs Jan 6 '13 at 22:40

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