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I'm trying to make a text editor in Ruby, but I don't know how to memorize an input with gets.chomp.

Here is my code so far:

outp =
def tor
    text = gets.chomp
    outp = "#{outp}" += "#{text}"
    puts outp
end

while true
    tor
end
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1  
What do you mean by "memorize"? –  the Tin Man Jan 6 '13 at 22:02
1  
What you have is not valid Ruby code. –  Andrew Marshall Jan 6 '13 at 22:08
1  
suspect memoize ? –  Michael Durrant Jan 6 '13 at 22:11
    
i know it is not valid i was just trying to explain what i needed help with by using a code. –  TorB Jan 7 '13 at 14:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ordinary variables , like outp, in a method are only visible (AKA have scope) inside that method.

a = "aaa"
def x
  puts a
end
x # =>error: undefined local variable or method `a' for main:Object

Why is that? For one thing, if you are writing a method and you need a counter, you can use a variable named i (or whatever) without worrying about other variables named i outside your method.

But... you want to interact with an outside variable in your method! This is one way:

@outp = "" # note the "", initializing @output to an empty string.

def tor
    text = gets.chomp
    @outp = @outp + text #not "#{@output}"+"#{text}", come on.
    puts @outp
end

while true
    tor
end

The @ gives this variable a greater visisbility (scope).

This is another way: pass the variable as an argument. It is as saying to your method: "Here, work with this.".

output = ""

def tor(old_text)
  old_text + gets.chomp
end

loop do #just another way of saying 'while true'
  output = tor(output)
  puts output
end
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thank you. that was exactly what i was looking for –  TorB Jan 7 '13 at 14:04

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