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Spec for the stored procedure is:
To select and return the Id from my table tb_r12028dxi_SandpitConsoleProofClient (order is not important just the top 1 found will do) and as soon as I've selected that record it needs to be marked 'P' so that it does not get selected again.

Here is the stored procedure:

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[r12028dxi_SandpitConsoleProofSweep]
    @myId INT OUTPUT
AS

/*
DECLARE @X INT
EXECUTE [xxx].[dbo].[r12028dxi_SandpitConsoleProofSweep] @X OUTPUT
SELECT @X
*/

DECLARE @NumQueue INT = (
            SELECT [cnt] = COUNT(*) 
            FROM xxx.DBO.tb_r12028dxi_SandpitConsoleProofClient
            WHERE [Status] IS NULL
            );
IF @NumQueue > 0 
    BEGIN

        BEGIN TRANSACTION;

        DECLARE @foundID INT = (SELECT TOP 1 Id FROM xxx.DBO.tb_r12028dxi_SandpitConsoleProofClient WHERE [Status] IS NULL);

        UPDATE x
        SET x.[Status] = 'P'
        FROM xxx.DBO.tb_r12028dxi_SandpitConsoleProofClient x
        WHERE x.Id = @foundID 

        SET @myId = @foundID;

        RETURN;

        COMMIT TRANSACTION;

    END;
GO

It is returning the error message:

Transaction count after EXECUTE indicates a mismatching number of BEGIN and COMMIT statements. Previous count = 0, current count = 1.

I've just added the Update script and the BEGIN TRANSACTION; and COMMIT TRANSACTION; before that it worked fine when it looked like the following...

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[r12028dxi_SandpitConsoleProofSweep]
    @myId INT OUTPUT
AS

/*
DECLARE @X INT
EXECUTE [xxx].[dbo].[r12028dxi_SandpitConsoleProofSweep] @X OUTPUT
SELECT @X
*/

DECLARE @NumQueue INT = (
            SELECT [cnt] = COUNT(*) 
            FROM xxx.DBO.tb_r12028dxi_SandpitConsoleProofClient
            WHERE [Status] IS NULL
            );
IF @NumQueue > 0 
    BEGIN


    SELECT TOP 1 @myId = Id FROM xxx.DBO.tb_r12028dxi_SandpitConsoleProofClient;
    RETURN;


    END;
GO

I added the BEGIN TRANSACTION; / COMMIT TRANSACTION; because I wanted to ensure that the data gets read into the output variable AND that the UPDATE happens. Should I just leave out this section of the procedure?

share|improve this question
    
I'm not 100% sure on what you are trying to achieve but I think someone could still insert a new record between you selecting and then updating - depending on your transaction isolation level. If you need to prevent that consider using something like repeatable read –  Greg Jan 7 '13 at 0:04
    
@Greg I'm trying to achieve a situation where I select the Id from the top 1 record (order is not important) and as soon as I've selected that record it needs to be marked 'P'. I've edited the OP slightly –  whytheq Jan 7 '13 at 8:31
    
@Greg added the sproc's spec at the start of the OP. –  whytheq Jan 7 '13 at 8:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Give that you want:

and as soon as I've selected that record it needs to be marked 'P' so that it does not get selected again.

you can achieve that in a single statment (and not in a transaction)

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[r12028dxi_SandpitConsoleProofSweep]
    @myId INT OUTPUT
AS
BEGIN
    UPDATE x
        SET x.[Status] = 'P',
            @myID = x.ID
        FROM xxx.DBO.tb_r12028dxi_SandpitConsoleProofClient x
        /* a sample join to get your single row in an update statement */
        WHERE x.ID = (SELECT MIN(ID)
                      FROM xxx.DBO.tb_r12028dxi_SandpitConsoleProofClient sub
                      WHERE ISNULL(sub.[Status], '') != 'P')
END

Note: When dealing with concurrent processing (ie: two threads trying to select from a single queue) it's more about the locking behavior than doing it inside a single transaction.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 thanks Andrew - so the processor will always select first (i.e the sub-query) and then update next? –  whytheq Jan 7 '13 at 11:35
1  
yes, you also may want to add a lock hint to the query ie: FROM xxx.DBO.tb_r12028dxi_SandpitConsoleProofClient x WITH (UPDLOCK, ROWLOCK) to prevent two threads updating and retrieving the same id –  Andrew Bickerton Jan 7 '13 at 12:16
    
excellent. one more silly question - what is the point of RETURN - I assumed it was something to use when a proc has an OUTPUT parameter? –  whytheq Jan 7 '13 at 12:40
1  
RETURN is a way to explicitly exit the stored proc, commonly seen near the top if you have an easy check on whether further work is required ie: IF NOT EXISTS(SELECT 'has unprocessed records' FROM xxx.DBO.tb_r12028dxi_SandpitConsoleProofClient x WHERE ISNULL(sub.[Status], '') != 'P') RETURN –  Andrew Bickerton Jan 7 '13 at 16:07
1  
yes that's correct, though I would recommend using an EXIST check over a COUNT (will do less reads to determine if the proc needs to continue or not) –  Andrew Bickerton Jan 7 '13 at 16:35

You have "RETURN;" before "COMMIT TRANSACTION;" which means "COMMIT TRANSACTION;" is never executed.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 thanks - I need to read up further about proper use of scripting TRANSACTIONS –  whytheq Jan 6 '13 at 23:47

As an alternative to a perfectly reasonable suggestion by @Andrew Bickerton, you could also use a CTE and the ROW_NUMBER() function, like this:

WITH ranked AS (
  SELECT
    Id,
    [Status],
    rnk = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY Id)
  FROM xxx.DBO.tb_r12028dxi_SandpitConsoleProofClient
  WHERE [Status] IS NULL
)
UPDATE ranked
SET
  [Status] = 'P',
  @myId = Id
WHERE rnk = 1
;

The ROW_NUMBER() function assigns rankings to all rows where [Status] IS NULL, which allows you to update only a specific one.

The use of the CTE as the direct target of the UPDATE statement is absolutely legitimate in this case, as the CTE only pulls rows from one table. (This is similar to the use of views in UPDATE statements.)

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