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Thanks a lot, with you help I understood all my mistakes (:

This is my first time using this website so I'm not sure if it is in the right format. Basically I have to make a function that fills a vector, but it isn't working at all. English isn't my first language so this is probably really confusing, but I'd appreciate if somebody helped me. Thanks a lot.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void le_vet(int v[1000], int n, int i)
{
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        printf("Type the number %d: ", i+1);
        scanf("%d", &v[i]);
    }
}

int main()
{
    int v[1000], n;
    printf("Type the syze of the vector: ");
    scanf("%d", &n);
    void le_vet(n);
    system ("pause");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

You are not calling le_vet in your main function, you are rather doing something more along the lines of creating a function pointer called "le_vet" that takes an int (by default, as no type is specified) and returns a void. I'm pretty sure this is not what's intended.

Instead, change void le_vet(n) to le_vet(v, n) and change this:

void le_vet(int v[1000], int n, int i)
{
   for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
   printf("Type the number %d: ", i+1);
   scanf("%d", &v[i]);
   }
}

to this:

void le_vet(int v[], int n)
{
   int i;
   for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
   printf("Type the number %d: ", i+1);
   scanf("%d", &v[i]);
   }
}

Since you're not needing to pass i in from outside the function, there's no need to include it in the arguments to the function. The first element in a for loop is executed once right as the loop is entered, therefore it is often used to declare the iteration variable for the loop, as I did here.

EDIT: Whoops. Can't do that in C. I'm to used to C++ that I made a goof here. Declare i just above the loop, as @Over Flowz suggests. Updating my revised code, but leaving this record as evidence that it's time to stop working and go eat dinner :)

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 but I'd change the revised version to void le_vet(int v*, int n) { ... }. I have a feeling the OP believes the 1000 there actually means something. – Praetorian Jan 7 '13 at 2:32
    
Very good point. It's technically correct either way, but maybe even better as v[]: an array where the size isn't an important part of the function declaration. – Matt Jan 7 '13 at 2:35

You are only passing one argument to le_vet(), when it requires three arguments. You also need to remove the void, since you are calling on a function.

Maybe this will work.

void le_vet(int n)
{
     static int v[1000];
     for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
     printf("Type the number %d: ", i+1);
     scanf("%d", &v[i]);
     }
}

You don't need the int i passed as a parameter, since you are creating another one in the for loop.

int i = 0;
while (i < n)
     {
          i++;
     }

is the same as

for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm going to guess that the next thing done after this is to use the v vector for something: therefore, I would keep the first parameter, as otherwise v inside of le_vet will be destroyed as soon as the function returns. – Matt Jan 7 '13 at 2:27
    
I revised the code to deal with the issue, thanks for pointing that out. – syb0rg Jan 7 '13 at 2:29

When you invoke like this:

...
scanf("%d", &n);
void le_vet(n); //you are declaring a function. You need to remove the void keyword
system ("pause");
...

You should invoke like this:

...
scanf("%d", &n);
le_vet(n);
system ("pause");
...

Then you will see the real errors, like the number of parameters

share|improve this answer

try:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void le_vet(char v[], int n)
{
int i = 0;
for(i = 0; i < n; i++)
{
    printf("Type the number %d: ", i+1);
    scanf("%s", &v[i]); //Read string, not decimal for output.
}
}

int main()
{
char v[1000] = {0}, n;
printf("Type size of the vector: ");
scanf("%d", &n);
le_vet(v, n);
printf("%s", v);
system("pause");
return 0;
}

Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer

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