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I'm having issues with receiving a transfer.

QTcpSocket->readAll() not reads enough bytes when I'm sending to it. When I send like a 15k bytes, it reads only some part of it and then does nothing. What I'm doing wrong?

QByteArray array;

array = socket->readAll(); //just reads some part, not fully.

why?

Sorry for my English.

Regards.

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When is this code executed? When handling the signal readyRead() or after waitForReadyRead() or something else? –  leemes Jan 7 '13 at 2:25
    
it's in QTcpSocket's readyRead() slot. –  Ovér Flôwz Jan 7 '13 at 2:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Most probably the socket didn't receive all data yet when you call readAll(). This is because of TCP communication happens in small packets (each having around 1KB of data, depending on a lot of things). These packets make up a stream in which the other end of the communication line writes bytes into. You have to assemble them on the receiving side. How you assemble them has to be defined in a protocol.

To solve this issue, you have to wait for all expected data before assembling it. Sometimes it is not known how much data is expected unless you read it (depending on the protocol).

Let's say you want to implement a protocol which says "everything until a line break is something we call a message". Now you want to receive such a message. This is done by successively reading and appending to a target buffer (like your QByteArray) until there comes a line break. However, there is another thing: When you expect a second message, it can be immediately after the first one in the TCP stream, so you just read not only the end of the first message, but also the beginning of the second. Just keep this in mind.

When not dealing with signal slot connection, you can write a synchronous receiver for such newline-separated messages like this:

QByteArray array;

while(!array.contains('\n')) {
    socket->waitForReadyRead();
    array += socket->readAll();
}

int bytes = array.indexOf('\n') + 1;     // Find the end of message
QByteArray message = array.left(bytes);  // Cut the message
array = array.mid(bytes);                // Keep the data read too early

processMessage(message);

When handling QTcpSocket::readyRead(), you can do something similar.

void MyClass::socketReadyRead() // connected to QTcpSocket::readyRead() signal
{
    array += socket->readAll();

    if(array.contains('\n')) {
        int bytes = array.indexOf('\n') + 1;     // Find the end of message
        QByteArray message = array.left(bytes);  // Cut the message
        array = array.mid(bytes);                // Keep the data read too early

        processMessage(message);

        socketReadyRead();                       // re-call myself to process more
    }
}

When you want to read everything sent via one TCP connection (until it gets closed by the peer), you can wait for this event either in a blocking way or process the data in a slot connected to the proper signal: QTcpSocket::disconnected.

Blocking:

socket->waitForDisconnected();
QByteArray array = socket->readAll();

Non-blocking (handling signals using slots):

void MyClass::socketReadyRead() // connected to QTcpSocket::readyRead() signal
{
    array += socket->readAll();
    // Do NOT process yet!
}

void MyClass::socketDisconnected() // connected to QTcpSocket::disconnected() signal
{
    processMessage(array);
}

Alternative non-blocking solution (essentially the same):

// You don't have to connect to QTcpSocket::readyRead() signal in this case

void MyClass::socketDisconnected()
{
    processMessage(socket->readAll());
}
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Hi, I don't really know how long it will be or whatever it will end with, I'm sending raw binary formats. I know how to do it with Winsock or POSIX sockets but new to qt.. –  Ovér Flôwz Jan 7 '13 at 2:33
    
@OvérFlôwz You have to know the length, either in advance or by detecting the end while receiving the data. What binary formats do you transmit? How would you wait for the whole message in POSIX sockets? –  leemes Jan 7 '13 at 2:36
    
I'm reading block by block with size of 1024 and when it reaches the end, returns 0 or -1, (don't remember right honestly) and then write all the data to disk. I'm sending just raw data, it's not format or anything else, just raw data, I don't know what it would be. –  Ovér Flôwz Jan 7 '13 at 2:39
    
The end of what? When the TCP connection closes? I'm asking, because TCP streams don't have anything like "end of data", but you can close the whole strem (but then you can't receive more data on the same connection, of course). –  leemes Jan 7 '13 at 2:39
    
did it in assembly, check if you like. recv_loop: invoke recv,[hSock],buffer,1024,0 cmp eax,0 jle end_loop invoke WriteFile,[file_handle],buffer,eax,wbytes,0 jmp recv_loop end_loop: ;done here. –  Ovér Flôwz Jan 7 '13 at 2:42

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