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I'm trying to write to the output stream and read the input stream of a simple Autoit script. If I do not use the newLine() character, I get the expected output: a line is sent to auto it, a line is sent to java, and that is repeated. If I add the newLine() character, it seems every cycle an extra line is sent to autoit. Why would this be?

Autoit:

Local $line

While (True)

    $line = ConsoleRead()

    ConsoleWrite( $line & "to java" & @LF )

    Sleep(25)

WEnd

Java:

p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("Test");

in = new BufferedReader( new InputStreamReader(p.getInputStream()));
out = new BufferedWriter( new OutputStreamWriter(p.getOutputStream()));

int i=0;

out.write("(" + i++ + ") to autoit");
out.newLine();
out.flush();

while ((line = in.readLine()) != null) {

    System.out.println(line);

    out.write("(" + i + ") to autoit");
    out.newLine();
    out.flush();

    if(i++ > 9)
        p.destroy();
}

Output:

(0) to autoit
to java
(1) to autoit
(2) to autoit
to java
(3) to autoit
(4) to autoit
(5) to autoit
to java
(6) to autoit
(7) to autoit
(8) to autoit
(9) to autoit
to java

Output I Expected:

(0) to autoit
to java
(1) to autoit
to java
(2) to autoit
to java
(3) to autoit
to java
(4) to autoit
to java
(5) to autoit
to java
(6) to autoit
to java
(7) to autoit
to java
(8) to autoit
to java
(9) to autoit
to java
share|improve this question
    
+1 Interesting question! I noticed that when we do more iterations then we always get +1 line "to autoit" as can already be seen in your output. –  mrt Jan 8 '13 at 17:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm no expert at this, not by any means, but consider these changes:

  • A problem with Autoit's ConsoleRead() is that it is not blocking and I believe doesn't recognize new lines. In other words, it's does not behave in any way similar to Java's Scanner.nextLine().
  • It may in fact read in a whole bunch of lines all at once, and I'm not sure if this can be predicted.
  • Consider using AutoIt's StringSplit(...) function to split out the lines using @CRLF as the delimiter, and then pushing each String in the resulting array to the standard out using ConsoleWrite(...)
  • Consider having AutoIt use the StringInStr(...) function to test for a token that tells it to exit.
  • On the Java side, I think that you will need to read the text from standard in on a separate thread from that which you write so as not to be blocking.
  • I have used Scanner to parse the standard in, and like using PrintStream for ease in outputting to the standard out.

For instance:

EchoCaller2.java

import java.io.BufferedOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.PrintStream;
import java.util.Scanner;

public class EchoCaller2 {
   private static final String AUTO_IT_ECHOER = "Echoer.exe"; // AutoIt program
   private static Scanner scan = null;
   private static PrintStream out = null;

   public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException,
         InterruptedException {
      ProcessBuilder pb2 = new ProcessBuilder(AUTO_IT_ECHOER);
      pb2.redirectErrorStream();
      Process p = pb2.start();
      scan = new Scanner(p.getInputStream());
      out = new PrintStream(new BufferedOutputStream(p.getOutputStream()));

      new Thread(new Runnable() {
         public void run() {
            while (scan.hasNextLine()) {
               System.out.println(scan.nextLine());
            }
            scan.close();
         }
      }).start();

      for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
         out.println("(" + i + ") to autoit ");
         out.flush();
      }

      out.println("exit ");
      out.flush();
      out.close();
   }
}

Echoer.au3

Local $line

While (True)

    $line &= ConsoleRead()

    $strArray = StringSplit($line, @CRLF)

    If $strArray[0] > 0 Then
        For $r = 1 to $strArray[0]
            If StringLen($strArray[$r]) > 0 Then
                ConsoleWrite($strArray[$r] & "to java" & @CRLF)
            EndIf
        Next
    EndIf

    If StringInStr($line, "exit") Then
        Exit
    EndIf

    $line = ""

    Sleep(25)

WEnd
share|improve this answer
1  
+1. Indeed, that gets the expected output. I played with this quite a bit after posting. I could get things to work indirectly and eventually did this (in fact with the exact same StringSplit at @CRLF) I still didn't know why I had to do that though. Eventually I cycled through the standard new line characters, then every non-printable character to be sure. The problem definitely seems to be the unpredictability of ConsoleRead(). Thanks a lot, I'm going to leave the question open for now, just to make sure a java-autoit expert doesn't see it :) But I'm sure it'll be the accepted answer. –  roundar Jan 9 '13 at 2:51
    
@roundar: I think that the issue is that ConsoleRead() reads whatever is in the standard input buffer each time it is called. If the buffer is empty it still returns an empty String, if it's partially filled it returns that partial String. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 9 '13 at 3:00
    
Why when I would flush the stream multiple times, was ConsoleRead() returning all the streams flushed, even if they were separated by several seconds and other times recognizing that it needs to go ahead and return without waiting for the second flush? (in both cases, nothing happened the the script's input between flushes) –  roundar Jan 9 '13 at 3:30
    
@roundar: I'm not sure, but your code was broken from not using separate threads, I do know that. Any delay that this caused may have resulted in the buffer holding more Strings in it. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jan 9 '13 at 3:33
    
Accepted. That could well be it, combined with the way ConsoleRead works. Thank you. –  roundar Jan 9 '13 at 3:42

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