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Hmmm I don't know much about database architecture but I really don't understand what's in CTO's mind but he insists on using character as the column type of the primary key of all of the tables we use. But the primary keys still look like this - > 1,2,3... etc. They are numeric. so I use integer + auto_increment for synthetic PK

But CTO says it's bad bc he can't issue queries using LIKE condition on PK ?!

  1. Is it Ok to use character for PK especially when your PK is numeric ?
  2. Is it right to use like condition on PK?

PS - so instead of auto increment/trigger,sequence CTO issues select query that fetches the biggest value from the table and he adds 1 and then he converts that value into string then stores it.

Edit
Thank you for your help ! But I need to convince him that it's going to be a disaster. I've only been taught that this(character 4 PK in a case like this) is a bad idea. He's argument is ...
1. The character PK won't take up much space.
2. The database query optimiser would have to re-read your query if you used int type PK because you would have to issue something like
"select * from employee where name like 'somename'
and
Select * from employee where id = 6.
because the where clause changes.
What he strongly argued that we use was something like
"select * from employee where @columnName like @value"
He said this way, the query optimiser would run better.

How can I prove or give him some valid reasons to change his mind ?

Thank you : )

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3  
CTO is clearly an idiot! –  Mitch Wheat Jan 7 '13 at 3:06
2  
I agree with Mitch. While I will avoid the entire PK/surrogate-PK argument, if the CTO wishes to use LIKE against the values - which are all numeric - why not just setup a computed CHAR-ish column with appropriate indices? –  user166390 Jan 7 '13 at 3:08
    
Absolutely. Tell her to come here and read. He is an idiot. Most likely the "I am political" type of CTO that otherwise would make a career at Burger King at the counter - obviously not too many skills IT wise. –  TomTom Jan 7 '13 at 3:09
    
@pst's comment about the Natural PK v. Surrogate PK makes me wonder if in your example above, the PK is being used as a natural key in your Domain? –  Mitch Wheat Jan 7 '13 at 3:12
4  
@TomTom While the CTO might be an idiot on the scale of a PHB (I have never met him/her myself), please try to use precise non-inflammatory language to describe the issues and solutions/better approaches. –  user166390 Jan 7 '13 at 3:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Lots of reasons why your CTO is making a mistake with that decision; let me cover a few:

  1. As you've noted, you have to take extra steps to generate a new auto-incrementing PRIMARY KEY. That's a computing cost, and it also increases the likelihood that it will be inconsistently applied at some point in the future.

  2. Characters will cost more in disk space once they exceed 4 characters (in other words, 12345 is a lot cheaper to store than "12345").

  3. IF you are using a clustered index on your Primary Key (which is the default for some RDBM's), sorting for characters is completely different than sorting an integer:

Characters: 1, 10, 101, 11,12,13,14,15... Numeric: 1,2,3,4...

If you're inserting the max numeric value as a character, you're shredding your indexes. Not an insurmountable problem, but more wasted computing power to clean up.

As for your second question about using LIKE on a PRiMARY KEY, I cant think of a reason why you would do something like that; if you need the power of LIKE, it's usually because you've assigned some sort of significance to the column being used as the PRIMARY KEY, which means you need to expose it to your end user. IF that's the case, then I would use a surrogate auto-incrementing numeric primary key, and expose some form of ID to the user.

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+1. "if you need the power of LIKE, it's usually because you've assigned some sort of significance to the column being used as the PRIMARY KEY, which means you need to expose it to your end user. IF that's the case, then I would use a surrogate auto-incrementing numeric primary key, and expose some form of ID to the user." - Spot on. (This is what I was hinting at in my comment to the OP) –  Mitch Wheat Jan 7 '13 at 3:20

1: yes, it is ok. It also is ok to always drive 10 miles an hour in a car. TH e car won't break down. Chars (or varchars) are a LOW slower in any comparison, so the result is a requirement for a larger budget for the same performance. They waste space, they are slow. I suggest you do the only sensible thing here - find a job with someone not an idiot.

2: Not even sure. See, the problem here is - that this is most likely simply something you CAN NOT USE. As in: The database will not allow it. I really never tried - I also do not try hitting a concrete block with 100 miles an hour just to see whether it damages the car. This just makes so little sense.

Your CTO obviously need to take some holidays and read a book. Possibly someone should hav a talk to the CEO and send him here - he got an idiot into the CTO position.

There are arguments against and for synthetic (one field) primary keys, but I have NEVER in 25 years I work with database see someone do that outside of DBase or Cobol. It is an epic ignorance. Pointy Haired boss.

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Thanks for your input ! :) –  PerfectGundam Jan 7 '13 at 3:59

Well, you could do something like this (assuming SQL 2008 R2+):

create table dbo.keep_the_peace (
  pk as right(replicate('0',10)+convert(varchar(10),pk_generator),10) persisted not null
, pk_generator int not null identity(1,1) 
, name nvarchar(128) not null
, constraint pk_keep_the_peace primary key nonclustered (pk)
, constraint uc_keep_the_peace unique clustered (pk_generator)
) 
go

insert dbo.keep_the_peace (name) values ('Hello')
insert dbo.keep_the_peace (name) values ('World')

select * from dbo.keep_the_peace

Pros:

  1. pk is varchar, CTO can use LIKE
  2. pk is autogenerated, no need to requery the table on insert
  3. pk sorts in the correct order, thanks to zero padding.
  4. pk_generator can be used in foreign key constraints, saving 6 bytes per reference, while the CTO can still join on pk and get the correct results.
  5. non-clustered indexes on keep_the_peace will enjoy a skinny clustering key (pk_generator)

Cons:

  1. pk + pk_generator use 14 bytes per row, 10 more than necessary.
  2. pk_keep_the_peace uses 14 bytes per row, 14 more than necessary. (LOL)

EDIT

What he strongly argued that we use was something like "select * from employee where @columnName like @value" He said this way, the query optimiser would run better.

  • there is no such syntax: column names cannot be parameterized without dynamic SQL.
  • there is no such benefit: a new execution plan will be generated each time column names change.

If columns in the WHERE clause change, then yes your query will be recompiled. There is no way to avoid this. Columns may be indexed differently.

For example, with the clustered index on id, this would execute as a clustered index seek:

select * from employee where id = 6

Whereas this would require an expensive table scan:

select * from employee where name like 'somename%'

Put a non-clustered index on name, and for the same query you get the more-efficient index seek + bookmark lookup (typically).

INT vs CHAR have nothing to do with it. NOTHING. Character keys just have a larger footprint (generally), and a large footprint reduces I/O throughput. But the performance of these vanilla queries will depend far, far more on indexing than data types.

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yes I meant stored procedures in MS SQL by using @ in font of columnName. Anyway thanks for your help. This quit cleared my mind ! –  PerfectGundam Jan 7 '13 at 4:41
    
Sure, np. To be clear on: you cannot use @ in front of column names in T-SQL, it simply isn't allowed, in stored procedures or anywhere else. If it were allowed, it would use some other syntax, like $columnName. –  Peter Radocchia Jan 7 '13 at 4:50

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