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I want to build a database which contains all the tags of a collection of audio files (FLAC, Vorbis, MP3, whatever). I've already sorted out the extraction (that was the easy part), but now I have some doubts about how to properly design the database that will contain them.

At the moment I have normalised it like this as a straightforward 1:m relationship:

file: filename, size, last_modified, …
tags: filename, tag, seq, value

Where filename is the primary key for the file table and ( filename, tag, seq ) the primary key for the tag table. Some tags do appear more than once; the seq column is just a number which remembers the exact order of those.

However, with a design like this extracting meaningful information about the files becomes a real pain. If I e.g. want to have just the ARTIST, ALBUM AND TITLE fields for each track I already have to join the file and tags table three times:

SELECT filename, artist.value, album.value, title.value
FROM file
    LEFT OUTER JOIN tags artist USING ( filename )
    LEFT OUTER JOIN tags album USING ( filename )
    LEFT OUTER JOIN tags title USING ( filename );
WHERE
    artist.tag = 'ARTIST'
    AND album.tag = 'ALBUM'
    AND title.tag = 'TITLE';

It's beyond question that this is not only extremely cumbersome to write, but is also quite slow because of all those joins. And this is only a simple example. In effect, all the queries that I eventually want to pose will piece together all the tags that they need as if they were stored as the columns of a large table.

I've already thought about not normalising the tags and just keep them as columns of the FILE table. But the number of tags is highly variable; some of the more standard tags like ARTIST and TITLE are almost guaranteed to be present, some of the more obscure ones are only on some of the files, but I need to work with them too.

To me it looks like I am trying to do it the wrong way, especially the tags table is "structured". Is there a better way to deal with this kind of data? For reference: I'm using PostgreSQL.

I gather from this post that my schema above is an EAV model, so it looks like I'm up for quite a hard problem…

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

But the number of tags is highly variable; some of the more standard tags like ARTIST and TITLE are almost guaranteed to be present, some of the more obscure ones are only on some of the files, but I need to work with them too.

You could have separate tables for the (mostly) guaranteed tags, and use the EAV model for the optional tags.

Relational databases are designed to join tables. Don't worry about performance problems with joins until you actually have a performance problem. Worry about getting your data relationships correct.

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Apparently that huge number of joins is indeed not nearly as slow as I feared them to be, especially with some strategically placed partial indices. So I'll try to pull as many of the known tags into a 'real' table and keep the EAV for the rest, that should give the best tradeoff between ease of use and flexibility. –  Vucar Timnärakrul Jan 7 '13 at 20:20

Instead of just sticking with the EAV model and letting the DBMS sort out the resulting jungle of joins, I have found suggestions to store all the tags in a single column as an XML document and query it via XPath when extracting values. PostgreSQL's HSTORE follows basically the same idea.

This way, I get rid of the EAV structure but there are other drawbacks. HSTORE has some rather strict limitations on how large the tag values can be, and XML poses a significant overhead both in storing and parsing.

In the end, the 'original' queries with all the JOINs are much clearer than the convoluted XML/Xpath stuff or the cumbersome string escapings needed for HSTORE. So the suggestion from the accepted answer seems best.

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