Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to present an object differently, twice.

  1. as a node in a TreeView (navigation/rename)
  2. as 2 TextBoxes (rename/edit content)
public class Item
{
    public string Name{get;set;}
    public string Content{get;set;}
}

My first solution was to keep things simple:

public class MainViewModel
{
    // collection of items (treeview navigation)
    public BindingList<ItemViewModel> Items{get;set;}

    // selected item (from treeview navigation)
    // used for textbox edit
    public ItemViewModel SelectedItem{get;set;}
}

public class ItemViewModel
{
    // Used for treeview navigation
    public bool IsSelected{get;set;}
    public bool IsExpanded{get;set;}
    public bool IsInEditNameMode{get;set;}
    public BindingList<ItemViewModel> Children{get;set;}
    public void BuildChildren();

    // Used for treeview display/rename
    // Used for textbox display/rename
    public string Name{get;set;}

    // Used for textbox edit
    public string Content{get;set;}
}

This works well for a while. But as the application grows more complex, the view model gets "polluted" more and more.

For example, adding additional presentations for the same view model (Advanced properties, Graph representation, etc)

public class ItemViewModel
{
    // Used for Advanced properties
    public BindingList<PropertyEntry> Properties {get;set;}
    public PropertyEntry SelectedProperty{get;set;}

    // Used for graph relationship
    public BindingList<ItemViewModel> GraphSiblings{get;set;}
    public bool IsGraphInEditNameMode{get;set;}
    public bool IsSelectedGraphNode {get;set;}
    public void BuildGraphSiblings();

    // Used for treeview navigation
    public bool IsNavigationInEditNameMode{get;set;}
    public bool IsSelectedNavigationNode{get;set;}
    public bool IsExpandedNavigationNode{get;set;}
    public BindingList<ItemViewModel> NavigationChildren{get;set;}
    public void BuildNavigationChildren();

    // Used for treeview display/rename
    // Used for textbox display/rename
    // Used for graph display
    // Used for Advanced properties display
    public string Name{get;set;}

    // Used for textbox edit
    public string Content{get;set;}
}

Currently, I'm still using a single view model for multiple presentations, because it keeps the selected item in-sync across all presentation.

Also, I do not have to keep duplicating properties (Name/Content).

And finally, PropertyChanged notification helps updates all presentation of the item (ie, changing Name in navigation updates TextBox/Graph/Advanced properties/etc).

However, it also feels like a violation of several principles (single responsibility, least privilege, etc).

But I'm not quite sure how to refactor it, without writing a lot of code to keep the sync/property notification working/duplicating the model's properties across each new view model/etc)

What I would like to know:

If it were up to you, how would you have solved this?

At the moment, everything is still working. I just feel like the code could be further improved, and that's what I need help with.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Could we,

  1. try separating-out various view-specific-behaviors from the ItemViewModel class.
  2. place/encapsulate the view-specific-behaviors in separate class (Behavior classes).

This gives you flexibility at run-time to instantiate/inject/switch behaviors. Yes, try to use Strategy pattern for making a cleaner, single responsible, easy to maintain code.

share|improve this answer
    
Encapsulation definitely sound like a viable solution. I can probably encapsulate the same ItemViewModel instance in presentation-specific view models. That way, I can provide view-specific properties, but still get the sync/notification from the same ItemViewModel instance across all presentations. Will look into this a bit more. –  user1705081 Jan 8 '13 at 1:53
    
After much testing, this is the solution that I'm going with. In my case, what I really wanted was "Multiple presentations for the same data object", hence, composition makes more sense than inheritance. –  user1705081 Jan 14 '13 at 7:45

How about using inheritance? Have a basic ItemViewModel, then subclass it to create a TreeViewItemViewModel, where you add the properties that relate to the tree-view rendering of this item within the subclass.

share|improve this answer
    
Inheritance will solve my duplicate properties problem. But it means I need to instantiate/populate/sync each presentation's view model. I.E, updating TreeItemViewModel.Name will not affect/raise events for GraphItemViewModel.Name, since they'll be different instances. But it does seem like I should find a way to refactor out the common properties –  user1705081 Jan 8 '13 at 0:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.