Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

There are a myriad of discussion threads on the subject of cross-platform Unicode string usage, but it seems there's is a wide range of opinion, without addressing some specific concerns that've been vexing me on a specific project I'm working on:

I have a large cross platform C++ code base that goes back almost twenty years. It contains a hodge-podge of all manner of string implementations, including:

  • char*
  • Pascal-style strings
  • std::string
  • several custom cross-platform classes with overlapping functionality
  • CFString
  • all manner of constant strings

This code base is in the process of being rewritten to entirely use Unicode strings and implementing a strong MVC architecture, with the hope that the model will be fully portable (Mac OS / IOS / Android / Windows 7 & 8 / Unix).

While persistent data is being written as XML/UTF-8, there are some dilemmas regarding string usage in run-time objects:

  1. I'd like to create a class that cleanly hides the implementation of storage, allocation and common string operations. Through the miracle of C++ operator and assignment overloading I'm hoping to be able to substitute a class instance to replace all the different string parameters that functions can accept. This would allow for an incremental conversion of the code base.

  2. We are constantly scanning / parsing / analyzing strings, and I worry that using a strictly UTF-8 underlying implementation for persistent objects might have performance issues. If not, would the modern std::string found in Microsoft's VC++ and GNU's G++ be a simple underlying implementation?

  3. The Mac OS / IOS versions ultimately need to have their strings "converted" to CFString. The CF functions are rich and highly optimized. I'm thinking it would be a good strategy to have my own class create CFStrings by providing CF with a buffer (for example, CFStringCreateWithCharactersNoCopy or CFStringCreateMutableWithExternalCharactersNoCopy). Seems as if this could reduce the amount of conversion/allocation CFString would normally require after fetching data from the model — ALTHOUGH perhaps in a proper MVC implementation the Controller/View shouldn't have access to actual strings owned by the model?

  4. Does C++ 11 change the picture for any of these cross-platform string issues?

I would've guessed that these issues should have been solved long ago — but from reviewing the responses on this site (and others) I can't see that it has.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Perception, Sam Miller, Anoop Vaidya, RivieraKid, talonmies Jan 7 '13 at 20:58

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Did you mean std::wstring instead of std::string? std::string cannot represent the full breadth of Unicode strings. –  Adam Rosenfield Jan 7 '13 at 4:29
1  
If you're going to use C++ on all platforms, std::string/std::wstring is the way to go. Be carefull however, as on Windows wide characters are typically only 16 bits (UCS-2), while on other platforms (GCC on Linux for example) it might be 32 bits (full UTF-32). –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 7 '13 at 4:29
    
@AdamRosenfield, std::string can well represent full Unicode, if your code uses UTF-8 to represent it. The most likely problem is ambiguitiy: there is nothing about that string type indicating that its bytes should be interpreted as UTF-8. But with a derived class, that could be avoided by using a suitable name. –  MvG Jan 7 '13 at 5:51
    
@MvG If a std::string is used to store an UTF-8 string, a special function is needed to get the number of code-points in the string, as the length function won't work. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 7 '13 at 6:04
1  
@JoachimPileborg, that's true. But the same goes for UTF-16 encoded wstring, or if you want the number of glyphs instead of code points. Whether any of this is relevant depends a lot on the actual application. Many useful functions can simply operate on bytes and won't have to care about the actual meaning of these bytes. –  MvG Jan 7 '13 at 6:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd like to create a class that cleanly hides the implementation of storage, allocation and common string operations. Through the miracle of C++ operator and assignment overloading I'm hoping to be able to substitute a class instance to replace all the different string parameters that functions can accept. This would allow for an incremental conversion of the code base.

Sounds like std::string with an added cast operator to const char*, so you won't have to call c_str(). Which will mean you have to use char and UTF-8 for storage, as opposed to UTF-16 or similar.

We are constantly scanning / parsing / analyzing strings, and I worry that using a strictly UTF-8 underlying implementation for persistent objects might have performance issues. If not, would the modern std::string found in Microsoft's VC++ and GNU's G++ be a simple underlying implementation?

This depends on several other factors. On the one hand, UTF-8 might be inefficient if your input contains a lot of non-ascii data and you have to analyze it one codepoint at a time. In that case, UTF-16 or even UTF-32 might be more reasonable, as you won't have as many case distinctions to reassemble code points from multiple string elements. On the other hand, performance greatly depends on whether you can pass strings by reference or have to create a copy, particularly when calling a function. So some modifications to your existing code base might be necessary in order to avoid too many copies.

The Mac OS / IOS versions ultimately need to have their strings "converted" to CFString. The CF functions are rich and highly optimized. I'm thinking it would be a good strategy to have my own class create CFStrings by providing CF with a buffer (for example, CFStringCreateWithCharactersNoCopy or CFStringCreateMutableWithExternalCharactersNoCopy). Seems as if this could reduce the amount of conversion/allocation CFString would normally require after fetching data from the model — ALTHOUGH perhaps in a proper MVC implementation the Controller/View shouldn't have access to actual strings owned by the model?

When you create strings without copying the data buffer, then you'll have to ensure that the buffer lives as long as the string is accessed. This might be true in some cases, but not in all. In general the problems are very similar to those you have with char* backed by a std::string, which is the reason why c_str() is an explicit function call and not only an automatic cast. By doing such a conversion, you have to guarantee that the original object stays allocated. In general, I'd pass const std::string& to views, so they won't accidentially change strings owned by the model. If they need to retain or modify the string, they'll have to copy it.

Does C++ 11 change the picture for any of these cross-platform string issues?

C++ 11 provides a number of new smart pointer implementations, which allow you more control over how long a string object remains allocated. So you could for example use a shared_prt<string> as the data storage of your class, to obtain automatic reference counting and deallocation of strings. This would give you a higher level of abstraction, but might be even farther away from what your current code base does, so I'm not sure whether this will make porting any easier for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @MvG -- this is EXACTLY the thinking I was looking for. Personally, I found it VERY CONSTRUCTIVE. Thanks! –  SMGreenfield Jan 8 '13 at 23:51

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.