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I'm trying to make a minimum rootfs for u-boot by this method

# image.dd with partition table as fat16 by parted
kpartx -a -v image.dd
mkdosfs -F16 -v /dev/mapper/loop0p1
mount -o loop /dev/mapper/loop0p1 /tmp/fs
cp my_files /tmp/fs
umount /tmp/fs
kpartx -d -v image.dd

dump it to usb stick

dd if=image.dd of=/dev/sdc

When I try to mount it

# mount /dev/sdc1 /mnt/sdc1
mount.nilfs2: Error while mounting /dev/sdc1 on 

/mnt/sdc1: Invalid argument

If I do it on usb disk directly, it could mount.

mkdosfs -F16 -v /dev/sdc1
mount /dev/sdc1 /mnt/sdc1 # workable

And I found I could use kpartx & mount to access the image.dd. I'm wonder if my build rootfs method is wrong? The problem seems occurs when just dd the image.dd to usb stick.

I found another evidence the mkdosfs output was differ:

loop method:

unable to get drive geometry, using default 255/63
/dev/mapper/loop0p1 has 255 heads and 63 sectors per track,
logical sector size is 512,
using 0xf8 media descriptor, with 32767 sectors;
file system has 2 16-bit FATs and 4 sectors per cluster.
FAT size is 32 sectors, and provides 8166 clusters.
There are 4 reserved sectors.
Root directory contains 512 slots and uses 32 sectors.

directly output to real usb stick method:

mkdosfs 3.0.13 (30 Jun 2012)
/dev/sdc1 has 66 heads and 62 sectors per track,
logical sector size is 512,
using 0xf8 media descriptor, with 20480 sectors;
file system has 2 16-bit FATs and 4 sectors per cluster.
FAT size is 20 sectors, and provides 5101 clusters.
There are 4 reserved sectors.
Root directory contains 512 slots and uses 32 sectors.
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closed as off topic by meagar, thkala, Tim Cooper, Lars Kotthoff, Eric J. Jan 8 '13 at 19:38

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After the dd command, you did get the kernel to rescan the partitions in /dev/sdc by e.g. using fdisk, right? –  thkala Jan 7 '13 at 16:34
    
Uh, from your output it seems that /dev/sdc1 is smaller than /dev/loop0p1. Is that true, or is it an mkdosfs artifact? –  thkala Jan 8 '13 at 7:50
    
My usb stick is 2G, but I just want to create a smallest dd dump file which is about 16~20 MB. The MBR of usb stick and the loopback file is the same. –  Daniel YC Lin Jan 8 '13 at 8:58
    
I suspect that you are hitting disk geometry issues. Have you tried creating a 2gb image file and dumping that to the stick? See if that fixes your problem... –  thkala Jan 8 '13 at 10:06

1 Answer 1

Without more information about what is happening, such as excerpts from your logs and/or a strace output from the mount run, it is really difficult to tell what is happening here.

I can take a few shots in the dark, in order of decreasing probability:

  • You did not get the kernel to rescan the partitions in /dev/sdc after using dd by e.g. calling the w command in fdisk without changing any partitions. With the kernel still using the old partition table everything can and does happen, such as a misaligned FAT partition being misdetected as a NILFS2 one.

  • From my own experience, mount quite often detects FAT (and other) filesystems incorrectly. It is much safer to explicitly specify the filesystem type with the -t option.

  • Creating the partition table in a loop device may have caused a disk geometry disparity when that table was dumped as-is to the USB stick. Did the loop file have exactly the same size as the USB device, at least?

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I'm sure it is not related to the kernel/mount problem. What's the better method to make USB stick image? Is there a better method and suitable for any user's usb stick? –  Daniel YC Lin Jan 8 '13 at 6:22

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