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I have the following code in C++ here:

#include <iostream>

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    goto line2;
line1:
    std::cout << "line 1";
    goto line3;
line2:
    std::cout << "line 2";
    goto line1;
line3:
    std::cout << "line 3";
    goto line4;
line4:
    std::cout << "Hello, World!\n";
    return 0;
}

If I made a larger program of lets say 10,000 lines of code and I decide I am never going to use functions that I write myself, I only use goto statements. I only use global variables. I am slightly insane in terms of best practices, but its for a very specific purpose. The question is, would this be efficient to jump around with goto statements? What if I have 1000 goto labels?

Do the goto statements translate directly into machine code which tells the computer just to JUMP to a different memory address? Is this a lower cost in the machine to jump around like this when compared with the cost to call a function?

I wish to know as I want to write a very efficient program to do some computations and I need to be very efficient without resorting to Assembly/Machine code.


No need to tell me this is a bad idea in terms of maintenance, understandability of code, best practices, I'm very aware of that, I just wish to have an answer to the question. I don't want any debate between whether its good to use function calls or good to use goto.


To clarify the question, I am concerned in this case of using gotos only with a 10,000 line program as to how it would compare with a traditional program using functions. There are multiple ways to compare and contrast between these two programs, for example how would the CPU cache perform. What sort of saving would it give without function calls. Without a call stack, how would this impact on the CPU cache, as CPU caches usually keep the stack close. Would there be therefor a case where it is likely to have a negative performance hit due to the cache not being utilized correctly. What is the actual cost of calling a function as compared to a jump in terms of time efficiency. There's a lot of ways to compare and contrast the two styles of programming in terms of efficiency.

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closed as not constructive by meagar, Cheers and hth. - Alf, Krishnabhadra, Nemo, Phil Jan 7 '13 at 6:36

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Please don't write code this way. Ever. –  Spudd86 Jan 7 '13 at 21:20
    
Why does everyone feel compelled to tell me this?... I've been writing code for over 15 years commercially and started programming at 12 years old, I never write code like this. Except, in this particular case, for my own project. –  Phil Jan 8 '13 at 4:57
    
Its interesting, everyone who sees this question immediately things "oh no, gotos, thats evil" but you have not considered that there are some good reasons for doing this. I am developing a computer language that compiles to C++ code and needs to make use of Goto statements for transfer of execution to different parts of the language. Do you know C++ used to compile to C code then get compiled by a C compiler? Coffeescript compiles to Javascript and gets executed as Javascript. The language I am developing is easier to compile to C++ if I make use of jumps to many different locations in code. –  Phil Jan 8 '13 at 5:13
    
Please remember a computer is just a machine which performs instructions, how we make use of that is up to us. –  Phil Jan 8 '13 at 5:16
    
I'm not say "gotos that's evil" I'm saying "gotos instead of function calls, that's evil" I've written code that uses gotos, You can't really compile C++ to C with current versions of the language, at least not efficiently. What you are proposing to write is EXACTLY the kind of thing that prompted the "Goto Considered Harmful" paper. –  Spudd86 Jan 8 '13 at 15:53

6 Answers 6

Do the goto statements translate directly into machine code which tells the computer just to JUMP to a different memory address?

Yes.

Is this a lower cost in the machine to jump around like this when compared with the cost to call a function?

Yes.

However, when the compiler sees a function call, it doesn't have to actually generate code to call a function. It can take the guts of the function and stick them right in where the call was, not even a jump. So it could be more efficient to call a function!

Additionally, the smaller your code, the more efficient it will be (generally speaking), since it is more likely to fit in the CPU cache. The compiler can see this, and can determine when a function is small and it's better to inline it, or when it's big and better to separate it and make it a real function, to generate the fastest code (if you have it set to generate the fastest code possible). You can't see this, so you guess and probably guess wrong.

And those are just some of the obvious ones. There are so many other optimisations a compiler can do. Let the compiler decide. it's smarter than you. It's smarter than me. The compiler knows all. Seriously, Cthulhu is probably a compiler.

You said not to, but I'm going to say it: I highly advise you to profile your code before deciding to do this, I can almost guarantee it's not worth your time. The compiler (most of which are near-AI level smart) can probably generate as fast or faster code with regular function calls, not to mention the maintenance aspect.

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There are more to optimization than just avoiding function call overload.. Good you mentioned CPU cache thing.. –  Krishnabhadra Jan 7 '13 at 5:32
    
@Krishnabhadra yes, I didn't mean to imply that this was all a compiler could do. I will make a note of that. –  Seth Carnegie Jan 7 '13 at 5:32

Do the goto statements translate directly into machine code which tells the computer just to JUMP to a different memory address?

Pretty much.

Is this a lower cost in the machine to jump around like this when compared with the cost to call a function?

A function call is going to make a pretty similar jump, but before you can make the jump, you have to set up the new stack frame for the new function, push on parameters according to calling conventions, and at the end set up any return value and unwind. Yes, it's probably faster to not do this.

I am slightly insane

Yes.

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1) The question is, would this be efficient to jump around with goto statements? What if I have 1000 goto labels?

From your small example with 4 goto labels, where you jump back and forth, no it is not efficient in terms of performance. To avoid overhead in function call mechanism, this method is disabling many other optimization which the compiler will automatically do for you. I am not listing them, but this worth reading.

2) Do the goto statements translate directly into machine code which tells the computer just to JUMP to a different memory address?

YES (As others correctly pointed out)

3) Is this a lower cost in the machine to jump around like this when compared with the cost to call a function?

YES, only if your compiler is pre historic, and doesn't have any optimization mechanism in built. Otherwise NO.

And I am not talking about best practices..

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Please consider 1000 goto statements in 10,000 lines of code. –  Phil Jan 7 '13 at 6:00
1  
@Phil again (as meagre pointed out in his comment), no one can answer this question 1)without seeing your 10,000 line code (but I dont want to see it) 2) know about the compiler/machine you running this 3)compiler optimizations you are enabling/disabling.. We can only say this - In normal case, with modern compilers, a programmer don't have to worry much about overhead in function calling mechanisms. Again, that is compiler dependant. –  Krishnabhadra Jan 7 '13 at 6:08

Yes, the machine code generated from goto will be a straight JUMP. And this will probably be faster than a function call, because nothing has to be done to the stack (although a call without any variables to pass will be optimized in such a way that it might be just as fast).

And God help you when something doesn't work with this code. Or when someone else has to maintain it.

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3  
Or when someone else has to maintain it.. Ouch.. –  Krishnabhadra Jan 7 '13 at 5:24
2  
This is a gross over-simplification. Compilers do this thing called optimization. I would wager heavily that a compiler will produce more optimal code when functions are used, vs 10,000 lines of code containing 1000 goto's. –  meagar Jan 7 '13 at 5:26
1  
If you look again at what I said, you'll see that I was trying to be careful not to oversimplify what the optimizer will or won't achieve. –  DWright Jan 7 '13 at 5:28
1  
@krishnabhadra. Once this becomes a non-trivial piece of code, it'll probably be minimally faster than with function calls. A non-trivial piece of code will have enough variables involved that the compiler will not optimize away or inline all function calls. The stack will be occacionally pushed or popped as a result. this will not be faster. Doesn't mean that the gotos are better. In fact the opposite is true. –  DWright Jan 7 '13 at 5:30
1  
+1 There are a lot of people commenting who seem to know nothing about code optimization or how compilers handle gotos. –  Jim Balter Jan 7 '13 at 6:52

hard to answer your query precisely, it depends on complexity of your program and use of goto statements within.

goto statement is equivalent to unconditional jump instruction (e.g. jmp ). The scope of goto will be within the file.

Ritchie suggest that avoid using goto statement, and if still want to/have to use goto statement then use it in top-down approach, Dont use it in bottom-up approach.

Well these are text book details.

Practically you should be very sure where to use goto statement and after goto jump where your program flow will be, otherwise as you mentioned with 1000 goto statements it will be difficult for you also to decide the program flow, forget about others. So further improvement in your program will be very very difficult.

There are plenty of other facilities such as looping, conditional statements, break and continue statements, functions etc to help you avoid such problems.

Hope it helps.....

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2  
the query ----> Do the goto statements translate directly into machine code which tells the computer just to JUMP to a different memory address? the repy ----> goto statement is equivalent to unconditional jump instruction (e.g. jmp ). The scope of goto will be within the file. –  Kinjal Patel Jan 7 '13 at 5:40
2  
the query ------> The question is, would this be efficient to jump around with goto statements? What if I have 1000 goto labels? the answer -------> Practically you should be very sure where to use goto statement and after goto jump where your program flow will be, otherwise as you mentioned with 1000 goto statements it will be difficult for you also to decide the program flow, forget about others. So further improvement in your program will be very very difficult. –  Kinjal Patel Jan 7 '13 at 5:42

In short, 'GoTo' statements can be efficient, but that is really how they are used. According to Herbert Schildt (C++ from the GROUND UP), "There are no programming situations that require the use of the goto statement -- it is not an item necessary for making the language complete." Ultimately, the primary reason for many programmers disliking the statement is that goto statements tend to clutter your code and/or make it very difficult to read because, as per the name, gotos can jump from place to place. With that being said, there are times where a goto statement can reduce clutter as well as make code more efficient, but that is totally dependent upon how you use them and the context that they are used in. Personally, I would recommend using function calls, as oppose to several goto statements; others may disagree.

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1  
Thanks, politely- I know this. I'm not trying to start a debate between goto and function calls. –  Phil Jan 7 '13 at 5:28
    
Lol, yeah, I saw your last line a little late, my apologizes. –  David Venegoni Jan 7 '13 at 5:32

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