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I'm writing a simple hash table with a set of 10 bucket lists. The index is calculated using the built-in hash() and then modulo the table size. However, when I try to append the object to the bucket list at that index, it gets appended to every bucket list instead. I've tried defining add_HT different ways but i keep getting the same result. What am I doing wrong?

size = 10
HT = [ [] ] * size

def add_HT(data):
    index = hash(data) % size
    HT[index].append(data)

print HT

[[], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], []]

add_HT('hello')

[['hello'], ['hello'], ['hello'], ['hello'], ['hello'], ['hello'], ['hello'], ['hello'], ['hello'], ['hello']]
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

HT = [ [] ] * size makes size number of pointers to the same list. add_HT isn't the problem here. You need to define HT as [[] for i in xrange(size)].

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You're defining HT as ten references to a single list. Instead, define it like this:

HT = [[] for _ in xrange(size)]
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As Volatility and kindall already explained, HT = [ [] ] * size makes 10 copies of the same empty list, not 10 different empty lists. list identity always bites novice programmers—and occasionally bites even the experts.

They already showed you how to solve the problem and get 10 different empty lists. But there's another way around this problem. If you can rewrite your program to not mutate the lists at all, it doesn't matter whether they're the same or not:

def add_HT(data):
    index = hash(data) % size
    HT[index] = HT[index] + [data]

Now:

>>> add_HT('hello')
>>> add_HT('goodbye')
>>> HT
[['goodbye'], ['hello'], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], []]

What's happening here is that you're making a new bucket each time you append, and replacing the old bucket, so the buckets are immutable. (You might want to store them as tuples instead of lists, to make sure you don't accidentally mutate them.)

You can take this even farther, and make not just each HT[i] immutable, but also HT itself:

def add_HT(data):
    global HT
    index = hash(data) % size
    HT = [bucket if i != index else bucket + [data] for i, bucket in enumerate(HT)]

Sometimes making things immutable makes the code simpler, sometimes more complex. (In this case, I think the first immutable version is just about as simple as the mutable version, but the second is much less readable.) Sometimes it makes the code more faster, sometimes slower. (In this case, a quick test shows the first is about the same speed, but the second 50x slower, and uses a lot more memory. On the other hand, using PyPy instead of CPython, they're instead 15% and 30% slower, respectively…) But it always makes it easier to reason about—you don't have to worry about object identity. Except when it makes things easier to write, and easier to read, and faster, there's a tradeoff that you have to consider. But it's worth knowing how to do it.

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Here is the correct version:

size = 10
HT = [ [] for x in range(size)]

def add_HT(data):
    index = hash(data) % size
    HT[index].append(data)

print HT

add_HT('hello')
print HT

Output:

>>> 
[[], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], []]
[[], ['hello'], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], []]
>>>
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