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package ThreadExample;

/**
 *
 * @author Administrator
 */


public class SynThread {

    /**
     * @param args the command line arguments
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Share s=new Share();
        MyThread m1=new MyThread(s,"Thread1");
        MyThread m2=new MyThread(s,"Thread2");
        MyThread m3=new MyThread(s,"Thread3");

        // TODO code application logic here
    }

}


class MyThread extends Thread{
    Share s;
    MyThread(Share s,String str){
        super(str);
        this.s=s;
        start();
    }
    public void run(){
        s.doword(Thread.currentThread().getName());
    }
}




class Share{
    public synchronized void doword(String str){
        for(int i=0;i<5;i++){
        System.out.println("Started   :"+str);
        try{
            Thread.sleep(100);
        }catch(Exception e){}
            }
    }
}

/*Output

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.VerifyError: (class: ThreadExample/Share, method: signature: ()V) Constructor must call super() or this() at ThreadExample.SynThread.main(SynThread.java:18) */

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Are you sure you are running the latest version of your classes (do the classes match the source)? This should have been a compile error. –  Thilo Jan 7 '13 at 7:11
    
Yes i am running the latest version and it does have a compile error .. posted under output –  zizou. Jan 7 '13 at 7:14
    
That is not a compile error. That is a runtime error. Can you recompile everything and try again? –  Thilo Jan 7 '13 at 7:15
    
It worked. Thanks.. –  zizou. Jan 7 '13 at 7:20

1 Answer 1

It looks like you are running an old version of your code. Maybe some of your classes did not get compiled the last time round? Try recompiling everything.

FWIW, the error is the JVM complaining that the class constructor does not call the super constructor. This should not happen at runtime, because the compiler also checks for the same thing (and wouldn't normally produce a class file at all).

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