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I have the following struct:

type XMLProduct struct {
    XMLName          xml.Name `xml:"row"`
    ProductId        string   `xml:"product_id"`
    ProductName      string   `xml:"product_name"`
    OriginalPrice    string   `xml:"original_price"`
    BargainPrice     string   `xml:"bargain_price"`
    TotalReviewCount int      `xml:"total_review_count"`
    AverageScore     float64  `xml:"average_score"`
}

And I use the encoding/xml to encode this and then display it on web page.

The ProductName field needs to be enclosed with <![CDATA[]]. But if I write it as <![CDATA[ + p.ProductName + ]]>, the < and > will be translated to &lt; and &gt;.

How can I create the CDATA at minimal cost?

share|improve this question
    
Why does it need to be CDATA? A CDATA section is a convenience facility, it can be interchanged with an XML encoded value and the document would be the same. –  Tomalak Jan 7 '13 at 7:27
2  
@Tomalak It's the company specification... –  Spirit Zhang Jan 7 '13 at 7:33
    
The source of encoding/xml/marshal.go does not suggest that outputting CDATA is supported. (Again, CDATA is technically unnecessary. Maybe the specification can be modified after all?) –  Tomalak Jan 7 '13 at 7:58
3  
CDATA is not unnecessary, it has a clear purpose. XML is meant to be a human-readable format and can potentially be created by hand. Having CDATA sections is very convenient as you cannot expect users to HTML-encode what they are writing. Go should definitely support that. –  this.lau_ Aug 18 '13 at 13:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As @Tomalak mentioned, outputting CDATA is not supported.

You can probably write ![CDATA[ as xml tag and later on replace the closing tag from the resulting xml. Will this work for you? Its probably not the one with minimal costs, but easiest. You can of course replace the MarshalIndent call with just the Marshal call in the example below.

http://play.golang.org/p/2-u7H85-wn

package main

import (
    "encoding/xml"
    "fmt"
    "bytes"
)

type XMLProduct struct {
    XMLName          xml.Name `xml:"row"`
    ProductId        string   `xml:"product_id"`
    ProductName      string   `xml:"![CDATA["`
    OriginalPrice    string   `xml:"original_price"`
    BargainPrice     string   `xml:"bargain_price"`
    TotalReviewCount int      `xml:"total_review_count"`
    AverageScore     float64  `xml:"average_score"`
}

func main() {
    prod := XMLProduct{
        ProductId:        "ProductId",
        ProductName:      "ProductName",
        OriginalPrice:    "OriginalPrice",
        BargainPrice:     "BargainPrice",
        TotalReviewCount: 20,
        AverageScore:     2.1}

    out, err := xml.MarshalIndent(prod, " ", "  ")
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Printf("error: %v", err)
        return
    }

    out = bytes.Replace(out, []byte("<![CDATA[>"), []byte("<![CDATA["), -1)
    out = bytes.Replace(out, []byte("</![CDATA[>"), []byte("]]>"), -1)
    fmt.Println(string(out))
}
share|improve this answer
4  
That's horrible and quite sad. Has anyone filed an enhancement request to get a more efficient implementation into the standard api? –  Rick-777 Jan 7 '13 at 21:30
    
@Rick-777: if there was a legitimate need for the feature, perhaps. But as other comments have said, XML parsers are required to treat CDATA blocks and equivalent encoded character data the same, so there isn't much reason to care which version is used when encoding. –  James Henstridge Jan 8 '13 at 4:14
2  
That's not entirely correct. The parser is required to find the end of the CDATA but not otherwise parse all the character data in the block. This means it is, for example, easy to put verbatim javascript code containing < and > symbols into XHTML without needing to use the &lt; or &gt; form. –  Rick-777 Jan 8 '13 at 9:26

I'm not sure which version of go the innerxml tag became available in, but it allows you to include data which won't be escaped:

Code:

package main

import (
    "encoding/xml"
    "os"
)

type SomeXML struct {
    Unescaped CharData
    Escaped   string
}

type CharData struct {
    Text []byte `xml:",innerxml"`
}

func NewCharData(s string) CharData {
    return CharData{[]byte("<![CDATA[" + s + "]]>")}
}

func main() {
    var s SomeXML
    s.Unescaped = NewCharData("http://www.example.com/?param1=foo&param2=bar")
    s.Escaped = "http://www.example.com/?param1=foo&param2=bar"
    data, _ := xml.MarshalIndent(s, "", "\t")
    os.Stdout.Write(data)
}

Output:

<SomeXML>
    <Unescaped><![CDATA[http://www.example.com/?param1=foo&param2=bar]]></Unescaped>
    <Escaped>http://www.example.com/?param1=foo&amp;param2=bar</Escaped>
</SomeXML>
share|improve this answer

Expanding on the answer by @BeMasher, you can use the xml.Marshaller interface to do the work for you.

package main

import (
    "encoding/xml"
    "os"
)

type SomeXML struct {
    Unescaped CharData
    Escaped   string
}

type CharData string

func (n CharData) MarshalXML(e *xml.Encoder, start xml.StartElement) error {
    return e.EncodeElement(struct{
        S string `xml:",innerxml"`
    }{
        S: "<![CDATA[" + string(n) + "]]>",
    }, start)
}

func main() {
    var s SomeXML
    s.Unescaped = "http://www.example.com/?param1=foo&param2=bar"
    s.Escaped = "http://www.example.com/?param1=foo&param2=bar"
    data, _ := xml.MarshalIndent(s, "", "\t")
    os.Stdout.Write(data)
}

Output:

<SomeXML>
    <Unescaped><![CDATA[http://www.example.com/?param1=foo&param2=bar]]></Unescaped>
    <Escaped>http://www.example.com/?param1=foo&amp;param2=bar</Escaped>
</SomeXML>
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