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What algorithm should we use to get the count of n digit numbers such that the product of its digits is p; the special condition here is that none of the digits should be 1;

What i have thought so far is to do a prime factorization of p. Say n=3 and p=24.

we first do a prime factorization of 24 to get : 2*2*2*3.

now i have problem in determining the combinations of these which are

4*2*3 , 2*4*3, .... etc Even if can do so... how will I scale for n is way smaller than the count of primes.

I am not too sure if thats the right direction... any inputs are welcome.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First, you don't really need full prime decomposition, only decomposition to primes smaller than your base (I guess you mean 10 here but the problem can be generalized to any base). So we only need factorization into the first 4 primes: 2, 3, 5 and 7. If the rest (prime or not) factor is anything bigger than 1, then the problem has 0 solutions.

Now, lets assume that the number p is factored into:

p = 2^d1 * 3^d2 * 5^d3 * 7^d4

and is also composed from the n digits:

p = d(n-1)d(n-2)...d2d1d0

Then, rearranging the digits, is will also be:

p = 2^q2 * 3^q3 * 4^q4 * 5^q3 * ... * 9^q9

where qi >= 0 and q2 + q3 + ... q9 = n

and also (due to the factorization):

for prime=2:  d1 = q2      + 2*q4      + q6      + 3*q8
for prime=3:  d2 =      q3             + q6             + 2*q9
for prime=5:  d3 =                  q5
for prime=7:  d4 =                            q7

So the q5 and q7 are fixed and we have to find all non-negative integer solutions to the equations:
(where the unknowns are the rest qi: q2, q3, q4, q6, q8 and q9)

         d1 = q2      + 2*q4 + q6 + 3*q8
         d2 =      q3        + q6        + 2*q9
n - d3 - d4 = q2 + q3 +   q4 + q6 +   q8 +   q9

For every one of the above solutions, there are several rearrangements of the digits, which can be found by the formula:

X = n! / ( q2! * q3! * ... q9! )

which have to be summed up.

There may be a closed formula for this, using generating functions, you could post it at Math.SE


Example for p=24, n=3:

p = 2^3 * 3^1 * 5^0 * 7^0

and we have:

d1=3, d2=1, d3=0, d4=0

The integer solutions to:

3 = q2      + 2*q4 + q6 + 3*q8
1 =      q3        + q6        + 2*q9
3 = q2 + q3 +   q4 + q6 +   q8 +   q9

are (q2, q3, q4, q6, q8, q9) =:

(2, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0) 
(1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0)

which give:

3! / ( 2! * 1! )      = 3
3! / ( 1! * 1! * 1! ) = 6

and 3+6 = 9 total solutions.


Example for p=3628800, n=10:

p = 2^8 * 3^4 * 5^1 * 7^1

and we have:

d1=8, d2=4, d3=1, d4=1

The integer solutions to:

8 = q2      + 2*q4 + q6 + 3*q8
4 =      q3        + q6        + 2*q9
8 = q2 + q3 +   q4 + q6 +   q8 +   q9

are (q2, q3, q4, q6, q8, q9) (along with the corresponding digits and the rearrangements per solution):

(5, 0, 0, 0, 1, 2)    22222899 57    10! / (5! 2!)       =  15120
(4, 0, 2, 0, 0, 2)    22224499 57    10! / (4! 2! 2!)    =  37800
(4, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1)    22223689 57    10! / (4!)          = 151200
(3, 2, 1, 0, 1, 1)    22233489 57    10! / (3! 2!)       = 302400
(4, 0, 1, 2, 0, 1)    22224669 57    10! / (4! 2!)       =  75600
(3, 1, 2, 1, 0, 1)    22234469 57    10! / (3! 2!)       = 302400
(2, 2, 3, 0, 0, 1)    22334449 57    10! / (3! 2! 2!)    = 151200
(2, 4, 0, 0, 2, 0)    22333388 57    10! / (4! 2! 2!)    =  37800
(3, 2, 0, 2, 1, 0)    22233668 57    10! / (3! 2! 2!)    = 151200
(2, 3, 1, 1, 1, 0)    22333468 57    10! / (3! 2!)       = 302400
(1, 4, 2, 0, 1, 0)    23333448 57    10! / (4! 2!)       =  75600
(4, 0, 0, 4, 0, 0)    22226666 57    10! / (4! 4!)       =   6300
(3, 1, 1, 3, 0, 0)    22234666 57    10! / (3! 3!)       = 100800
(2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0)    22334466 57    10! / (2! 2! 2! 2!) = 226800
(1, 3, 3, 1, 0, 0)    23334446 57    10! / (3! 3!)       = 100800
(0, 4, 4, 0, 0, 0)    33334444 57    10! / (4! 4!)       =   6300

which is 2043720 total solutions, if I haven't done any mistakes..

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+1 for this. BTW is this just useful or brilliant? In a quest of getting a great feature :) –  bonCodigo Jan 8 '13 at 17:06
    
Nice solution. But can u tell the way to find the solutions of the tree equations programmitically. –  Wayne Rooney Jan 14 '13 at 2:34

I don't think I'd start by tackling what is known to be a 'hard' problem, computing the prime decomposition. By I don't think I mean my gut feeling, rather than any rigorous computation of complexity, tells me.

Since you are ultimately only interested in the single-digit divisors of p I'd start by dividing p by 2, then by 3, then 4, all the way up to 9. Of course, some of these divisions won't produce an integer result in which case you can discard that digit from further consideration.

For your example of p = 24 you'll get {{2},12}, {{3},8}, {{4},6}, {{6},4}, {{8},3} (ie tuples of divisor and remainder). Now apply the approach again, though this time you are looking for the 2 digit numbers whose digits multiply to the remainder. That is, for {{2},12} you would get {{2,2},6},{{2,3},4},{{2,4},3},{{2,6},2}. As it happens all of these results deliver 3-digit numbers whose digits multiply to 24, but in general it is possible that some of the remainders will still have 2 or more digits and you'll need to trim the search tree at those points. Now go back to {{3},8} and carry on.

Note that this approach avoids having to separately calculate how many permutations of a set of digits you need to consider because it enumerates them all. It also avoids having to consider 2*2 and 4 as separate candidates for inclusion.

I expect you could speed this up with a little memoisation too.

Now I look forward to someone more knowledgeable in combinatorics telling us the closed-form solution to this problem.

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He doesn't need full prime decomposition, only decomposition to primes smaller than 10 (2, 3, 5 and 7). If the rest (prime or not) factor is anything bigger than 1, then the problem has 0 solutions. –  ypercube Jan 7 '13 at 10:05
    
@Asiri: That would work if the digits are in base 14 (or larger) and you have a digit with value 13. In base-10, there is no such digit. –  ypercube Jan 7 '13 at 10:11
    
@ypercube: My bad, I read the question wrong. Thanks for the clarification. –  Asiri Rathnayake Jan 7 '13 at 10:12
    
@Mark: Wouldn't {{3},8} re-produce some of the solutions already calculated from {{2},12}? –  Asiri Rathnayake Jan 7 '13 at 10:37
1  
@AsiriRathnayake: no, all the numbers arising from {{3},8} start with digit 3, all those arising from {{2},12} start with 2 -- I believe that my approach calculates all the valid permutations of a set of 3 digits without explicitly permuting any set of digits. –  High Performance Mark Jan 7 '13 at 10:43

You can use dynamic programming approach based on the following formula:

f[ n ][ p ] = 9 * ( 10^(n-1) - 9^(n-1) ),  if p = 0
              0,  if n = 1 and p >= 10
              1,  if n = 1 and p < 10
              sum{ f[ n - 1 ][ p / k ] for 0 < k < 10, p mod k = 0 }, if n > 1 

The first case is a separate case for p = 0. This case calculates in O(1), besides helps to exclude k = 0 values from 4th case.
The 2nd and 3rd cases are the dynamic base.
The 4th case k sequentially takes all possible values of the last digit, and we sum up quantities of numbers with product p with last digit k by reducing to the same problem of smaller size.

This will have O( n * p ) running time if you implement dp with memorization.

PS: My answer is for more general problem than OP described. If condition that no digit must be equal to 1 must be satisfied, formulas can be adjusted as follows:

f[ n ][ p ] = 8 * ( 9^(n-1) - 8^(n-1) ),  if p = 0
              0,  if n = 1 and p >= 10 or p = 1
              1,  if n = 1 and 1 < p < 10
              sum{ f[ n - 1 ][ p / k ] for 1 < k < 10, p mod k = 0 }, if n > 1 
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that is beautiful insight.... –  Fluvid Jan 7 '13 at 10:38
    
I agree with the general idea. But I don't get the p = 0 case. Say, p = 0 & n = 1, these equation would give the answer 9 * 1? –  Asiri Rathnayake Jan 7 '13 at 10:52
    
@AsiriRathnayake: thanks, my bad, there have to be powers of n - 1. corrected now. –  Grigor Gevorgyan Jan 7 '13 at 12:06
    
@GrigorGevorgyan: What if p = 0 & n = 2, we'll still get 9 as the result. TBH I don't see why we need the p = 0 case. May be have p > 1 as a pre-condition... and let 1 < k < 10. This is because OP mentions that none of the digits should be 1. –  Asiri Rathnayake Jan 7 '13 at 16:02
    
@AsiriRathnayake: If p = 0 & n = 2 the answer is indeed 9. The numbers are 10, 20, 30, ..., 90. I posted a solution to general case, without condition about digits not equal to 1. If necessary, the formulas can be easily adjusted for that case. I will write a PS for that. –  Grigor Gevorgyan Jan 7 '13 at 19:51

For the N digit numbers and product of its digits is p;

For example if n = 3 and p =24

Arrangement would be as follow (Permutation)

= (p!)/(p-n)!
= (24!) /(24 -3)!
= (24 * 23 * 22 * 21 )! / 21 !
= (24 * 23 * 22 )
= 12144

So it would be 12144 arrangement can be made

And for Combination is as follow

= (p!)/(n!) * (p-n)!
= (24!) /(3!) * (24 -3)!
= (24 * 23 * 22 * 21 )! / (3!) * 21 !
= (24 * 23 * 22 ) / 6
= 2024

May this will help you

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I think you need to explain more clearly how this answer solves the problem, if indeed it does. –  High Performance Mark Jan 7 '13 at 10:26
    
You calculated permutations and combinations for putting 24 entities into 3 positions, which is not what the question asks. I only count 10 arrangements for p = 24, n = 3. –  Dukeling Jan 7 '13 at 10:38
1  
I count 9: 234, 243, 324, 342, 423, 432, 226, 262, 622 –  ypercube Jan 7 '13 at 11:11
    
@ypercube: so do I –  High Performance Mark Jan 7 '13 at 11:45

The problems seems contrived but in any case there are upper bounds to what you seen. For example p can have no prime divisor > 7 since it needs to be a single digit ("such that the product of its digits").

Hence suppose p = 1 * 2^a * 3^b * 5^c * 7^d.

2^a can come from ceil(a/3) to 'a' digits. 3^b can come from ceil(b/2) to 'b' digits. 5^c and 7^d can come from 'c' and 'd' digits respectively. The remaining digits can be filled with 1s.

Hence n can range from ceil(a/3)+ceil(b/2)+c+d to infinity while p has a set of fixed values.

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Prime factorization feels like the right direction, though you don't need any prime greater than 7, so you can just divide by 2,3,5,7 repeatedly. (No solution if we don't get a prime, or get one > 7).

Once we have the prime factors, p % x and p / x can be implemented as constant time operations (you don't actually need p, you can just keep the prime factors).

My idea is, calculate the combinations with the algorithm below, and the permutations from there is easy.

getCombinations(map<int, int> primeCounts, int numSoFar, string str)
  if (numSoFar == n)
    if (primeCounts == allZeroes)
      addCombination(str);
    else
      ;// do nothing, too many digits
  else if (primeCounts[7] >= 1) // p % 7
    getCombinations(primeCounts - [7]->1, numSoFar-1, str + "7")
  else if (primeCounts[5] >= 1) // p % 5
    getCombinations(primeCounts - [5]->1, numSoFar-1, str + "5")
  else if (primeCounts[3] >= 2) // p % 9
    getCombinations(primeCounts - [3]->2, numSoFar-1, str + "9")
    getCombinations(primeCounts - [3]->2, numSoFar-2, str + "33")
  else if (primeCounts[2] >= 3) // p % 8
    getCombinations(primeCounts - [2]->3, numSoFar-1, str + "8")
    getCombinations(primeCounts - [2]->3, numSoFar-2, str + "24")
    getCombinations(primeCounts - [2]->3, numSoFar-3, str + "222")
  else if (primeCounts[3] >= 1 && primeCounts[2] >= 1) // p % 6
    getCombinations(primeCounts - {[2]->1,[3]->1}, numSoFar-1, str + "6")
    getCombinations(primeCounts - {[2]->1,[3]->1}, numSoFar-2, str + "23")
  else if (primeCounts[2] >= 2) // p % 4
    getCombinations(primeCounts - [2]->2, numSoFar-1, str + "4")
    getCombinations(primeCounts - [2]->2, numSoFar-2, str + "22")
  else if (primeCounts[3] >= 1) // p % 3
    getCombinations(primeCounts - [3]->1, numSoFar-1, str + "3")
  else if (primeCounts[2] >= 1) // p % 2
    getCombinations(primeCounts - [2]->1, numSoFar-1, str + "2")
  else ;// do nothing, too few digits

Given the order in which things are done, I don't think there would be duplicates.

Improvement:

You needn't look at p%7 again (deeper down the stack) once you've looked at p%5, since we know it can't be divisible by 7 any more, so a lot of those checks can be optimised away.

primeCounts needn't be a map, it can just be an array of length 4, and it needn't be copied, one can just increase and decrease the values appropriately. Something similar can be done with str as well (character array).

If there were too many digits for getCombinations(..., str + "8"), there's no point in checking "24" or "222". This and similar checks shouldn't be too difficult to implement (just have the function return a bool).

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