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I would like to have an asynchronous message passing in my Java program ,so for the first step it should continuously monitor the changes of some table in the DB. And when there are new incoming messages, it should display it. This is should be repetitive process, as long as the application is running.

May i Know how to proceed this for the following code, which has the polling method in it which has to keep on calling itself infinitely every 6 seconds and also should find the new incoming messages in the database.

here is the code snippet:

public class PollingSynchronizer implements Runnable {

private Collection<KPIMessage> incomingMessages;
private Connection dbConnection;


/**
 * Constructor. Requires to provide a reference to the KA message queue
 * 
 * @param incomingMessages reference to message queue
 * 
 */
   public PollingSynchronizer(Collection<KpiMessage> incomingMessages, Connection dbConnection) {
    super();
    this.incomingMessages = incomingMessages;
    this.dbConnection = dbConnection;
}

private int sequenceId;

public int getSequenceId() {
    return sequenceId;
}

public void setSequenceId(int sequenceId) {
    this.sequenceId = sequenceId;
}



@Override
/**
 * The method which runs Polling action and record the time at which it is done
 * 
 */
public void run() {
    try {


           incomingMessages.addAll(fullPoll());
            System.out.println("waiting 6 seconds");

            //perform this operation in a loop
            Thread.sleep(6000);

    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    } 
    Date currentDate = new Date();
    SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.SSSSSS");
//  System.out.println(sdf.format(currentDate) + " " + msg);
}

/**
 * Method which defines polling of the database and also count the number of Queries
 * @return 
 * @throws Exception
 */
public List<KpiMessage> fullPoll() throws Exception {

//  int sequenceID = 0;
    Statement st = dbConnection.createStatement();

    ResultSet rs = st.executeQuery("select * from msg_new_to_bde where ACTION = 804 order by SEQ DESC");
        List<KpiMessage> pojoCol = new ArrayList<KpiMessage>();
        while (rs.next()) {
            KpiMessage filedClass = convertRecordsetToPojo(rs);
            pojoCol.add(filedClass);
        }

        return pojoCol;
        }

/**
 * Converts a provided record-set to a {@link KpiMessage}.
 * 
 * The following attributes are copied from record-set to pojo:
 * 
 * <ul>
 * <li>SEQ</li>
 * <li>TABLENAME</li>
 * <li>ENTRYTIME</li>
 * <li>STATUS</li>
 * </ul>
 * 
 * @param rs
 *            the recordset to convert
 * @return the converted pojo class object
 * @throws SQLException
 *             if an sql error occurrs during processing of recordset
 */
private KpiMessage convertRecordsetToPojo(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {

    KpiMessage msg = new KpiMessage();
    int sequence = rs.getInt("SEQ");
    msg.setSequence(sequence);
    int action = rs.getInt("ACTION");
    msg.setAction(action);
    String tablename = rs.getString("TABLENAME");
    msg.setTableName(tablename);
    Timestamp entrytime = rs.getTimestamp("ENTRYTIME");
    Date entryTime = new Date(entrytime.getTime());
    msg.setEntryTime(entryTime);
    Timestamp processingtime = rs.getTimestamp("PROCESSINGTIME");
    if (processingtime != null) {
        Date processingTime = new Date(processingtime.getTime());
        msg.setProcessingTime(processingTime);
    }
    String keyInfo1 = rs.getString("KEYINFO1");
    msg.setKeyInfo1(keyInfo1);
    String keyInfo2 = rs.getString("KEYINFO2");
    msg.setKeyInfo2(keyInfo2);
    return msg;
}
}

Here the sequence id is the unique id in the table which keeps on increasing as new incoming messages arrive.

P.S : "Kind request : Pls give a reason for giving negative marks (thumbs down) . So that I can explain my question clearly"

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1  
Me - I'd use Quartz to create a repetitive polling task and I'd use JMS (HornetQ to be more specific) to handle the messaging part. I'm not a big fan of reinventing the wheel when there are already rock solid wheels available. –  Gimby Jan 7 '13 at 9:18
    
Polling? Can your raise some kind of event via a trigger? –  Martin James Jan 7 '13 at 9:27
    
@thanks Gimby may I know how to use quartz for this also am a beginner level programmer, also how to call this poll using asychronously like one keeps polling and other proccess the message and updates it.... –  Babu Jan 7 '13 at 9:27
    
@MartinJames I have no idea, am just stuck here.... –  Babu Jan 7 '13 at 9:29
    
polling is the other way around when you do not have an event. You learn to use quartz by reading its manual, that is too much to answer in a single post. –  Gimby Jan 7 '13 at 9:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Simple put it in a while(true) loop.

public void run() {
    while(true){
        try {


               incomingMessages.addAll(fullPoll());
                System.out.println("waiting 6 seconds");

                //perform this operation in a loop
                Thread.sleep(6000);

        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        } 
        Date currentDate = new Date();
        SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.SSSSSS");
    //  System.out.println(sdf.format(currentDate) + " " + msg);
   }
}

Hopefully you already started the Runnable as a new thread.

For new and updated messages you need a field, for instance "last_update" within the database. Than you need to alter your SQL statement for getting the new message to something like: "where last_update > $lastCheckedDate", where lastCheckedDate is set, whenever you check for new messages.

MAybe you also want to read something about concurrency in Java: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/

share|improve this answer
    
@ AdrianThat works it repeatedly calls polling but how at the same time I can check for new messages and also updated new messages...? –  Babu Jan 7 '13 at 9:45

putting in a while loop is one way, but I think it is better to avoid doing in such approach (there are lots of things to mess up, like transaction etc).

If you really need to do such kind of repetitive thing, consider using a scheduler. Spring 3.x do has scheduler built-in, or you can use Quartz too.

Even better way is to avoid polling like this. Is it possible to put a message in JMS queue when the data is updated, so that your logic will be invoked (through a message driven bean) once there is such message in JMS queue? (just one possible way, there are lots of similar way to do)

share|improve this answer
    
i will try to use quartz then... –  Babu Jan 7 '13 at 9:47
    
I think using a framework like Quartz depends on the heavily on the scope and size of your application. If this is the only "job" your application needs, creating a thread and polling is totally valid. Some searching also reveales Javas Timer and TimerTask. Maybe this is a bit "slimer" than Quartz: stackoverflow.com/questions/1453295/… –  Adrian Jan 7 '13 at 9:57
    
@Adrian Honestly using Quartz is already a very slim solution. Given that OP is in fact doing DB access, I don't think I can consider his app as those super-simple app. And, using Quartz (or other kind of scheduler) is not anything difficult or bulky. I cannot find any reason to avoid using that which is solid and make our app easier to develop. –  Adrian Shum Jan 8 '13 at 1:23

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