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I wrote a simple pointers code in c++, and I'm getting the stack corrupted runtime error around "str". I know it gives this error if you're trying to get to an unassigned place in an array, but in this case when the pointer gets to '\0' the while stops. could it be the ptr continuing to adavnce in memory and pointing at '\0'? Thanks in advance! : - )

Here's the code:

#include <iostream>
    using namespace std;
    #define SIZE 5
    void CHANGE(char str[]);

    void CHANGE(char str[])
    {
        char *ptr=str;
         while(*ptr!='\0')
         {
            if( ( (*ptr>='a')&&(*ptr<='z') )|| ( (*ptr>='A')&&(*ptr<='Z') ) )
             {
                 if(*ptr=='z')
                     *ptr='a';
                 else if(*ptr=='Z')
                     *ptr='A';
                 else
                    (*ptr)++;

             }

             ptr++;
         }

    }

    void main()
    {

        char str[SIZE];
        cout<<"please enter a sring\n";
        cin>>str;
        CHANGE(str);
        cout<<str<<"\n";
    }
share|improve this question
4  
Could it be you're using a string longer than four characters (since the zero-term eats one of your declared 5) ? What input are you testing with? – WhozCraig Jan 7 '13 at 9:54
3  
Do you have some requirement of using character arrays instead of std::string? Anyway, your main signature is non-standard and you assume that 'a' through 'z' and 'A' through 'Z' have contiguous character codes, which is not guaranteed. – chris Jan 7 '13 at 9:54
8  
NO NO NO NOOOOOOOOOO DO NOT USE DEFINE MACROS WHEN YOU MEAN CONSTANTS USE STD::STRING IF YOU MEAN STRING. AND A BOOK, GET A BOOOOOK – Sebastian Mach Jan 7 '13 at 9:55
2  
cout<<"please enter a sring\n"; You've made a typo there. It should be std::cout << "please enter a char[SIZE]\n". – Johnsyweb Jan 7 '13 at 10:04
4  
@user1889572 Ah, nice. Now this is a good opportunity to teach that student how silly it is to use fixed size buffers for code like this and how using std::string and std::getline are much more superior. Or, I hope not... for you to learn that. – R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 7 '13 at 10:22
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because you defined SIZE 5, you can get inputs up to size 4 because you are considering it as a null-terminated string. so in case you enter more characters than SIZE your CHANGE function will try to access memory where it hasn't been allocated. Hope it helped.

share|improve this answer
int main()

It works for me. By the way, SIZE should be much higher.

#define SIZE 10000
share|improve this answer
2  
Why 10000 and not 10001? – Johnsyweb Jan 7 '13 at 9:59
2  
Because 9999 isn't quite enough, and 10001 is just too damn big ?? – WhozCraig Jan 7 '13 at 10:00
    
/me checks calendar. Nope, still not 2013-04-01. – Johnsyweb Jan 7 '13 at 10:01
    
Hehe :D Maybe #define SIZE 0x3f3f3f3f // just kiddin' – user1948703 Jan 7 '13 at 10:01
2  
#define SIZE __CPLUSPLUS. It always works for some reason. – chris Jan 7 '13 at 10:02

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