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If you are going to create an index of items in the database... perhaps a list of users for the admin... how should this be done in the Object Orientated world?

Taking this as very basic example:

$sql = 'SELECT
            u.id,
            u.name
        FROM
            users AS u
        WHERE
            u.deleted = "0000-00-00 00:00:00"';

echo '<ul>';
foreach ($db->fetch_all($sql) as $row) {
    $url = './edit/?id=' . urlencode($row['id']);
    echo '
        <li><a href="' . html($url) . '">' . html($row['name']) . '</a></li>';
}
echo '<ul>';

Please ignore the fact that HTML in mixed in with the logic for now (just trying to keep it short).

Now some developers seem to think that in the OOP world, it should be done with something like:

class user {
    private $id;
    public function __construct($id) {
        $this->id = $id;
    }
    public function name_get() {
        return $this->value_get('name');
    }
    public function admin_url_get() {
        return '/admin/user/edit/?id=' . urlencode($this->id);
    }
    public function age_get() {
        // Calculate from $this->value_get('dob'), using date_diff()
    }
    public function address_billing_get() {
        // i.e. copy returned value onto the order object during checkout
    }
    public function address_delivery_get() {
    }
    private function value_get($field) {

        $db = db_get();

        $sql = 'SELECT
                    u.' . $db->escape_field($field) . '
                FROM
                    user AS u
                WHERE
                    u.id = "' . $db->escape($this->id) . '" AND
                    u.deleted = "0000-00-00 00:00:00"';

        if ($row = $db->fetch($sql)) {
            return $row[$field];
        } else {
            exit_with_error('Cannot return "' . $field . '" for user id "' . $this->id . '"');
        }

    }
}

class user_factory {
    static function get_all() {

        $users = array();

        $db = db_get();

        $sql = 'SELECT
                    u.id
                FROM
                    user AS u
                WHERE
                    u.deleted = "0000-00-00 00:00:00"';

        foreach ($db->fetch_all($sql) as $row) {
            $users[] = new user($row['id']);
        }

        return $users;

    }
}

echo '<ul>';
foreach (user_factory::get_all() as $user) {
    echo '
        <li><a href="' . html($user->admin_url_get()) . '">' . html($user->name_get()) . '</a></li>';
}
echo '</ul>';   

Some variations on this include:

  • Using an ORM, so you don't write the actual SQL (but thats for another day).

  • Changing the user __construct method to do a SELECT * FROM user WHERE id = X, so individual values don't need to be looked up each time via user->value_get().

  • Getting the user_factory::get_all() method to do a SELECT * FROM, and passing all the values into the individual user objects... I believe this is called a "builder" pattern though (rather than a factory).

To me this all seems very inefficient, with many queries going to/from the database... or getting data thats not going to be needed (SELECT * FROM isn't really a good idea).

For example, imagine that user table has fields such as their home/billing address (each as line 1, 2, 3, town, postcode, etc)... which in this case is allot of data to return for just the ID and name.

I presume also that the factory/builder object should also be able to accept parameters to search (e.g. the admin is looking for a particular user, and maybe on this page it should also include their email address field in the search), and also pass in a limit (e.g. pagination, where I'm guessing that 10,000+ records will probably cause the request to timeout).

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're confusing so many things, that I got confused... In 'OOP world', like in the real world, we think in objects. What are you trying to accomplish if I understood correctly is to have a list of users in the db that you want to query for different purposes?

Well, first of all we like to keep things organized according to a principle called Separation of Concerns, that is we structure the application in layers/module etc and each layer has its own responsibility.

So, the Persistence layer deals with everything related to the storage (database) and exposes an abstraction, that is one or more objects whose purpose is to 'translate' application objects to data and viceversa.

In your example, the persistence layer aka DAL (Data access Layer) will take care of the tables and all that. So, you create a table normaly the then for each task you have a method (this is all simplified of course).

So, for the case when you just want a list of users (id,Name), you'll have a method (function) like GetUsers() which will send the relevant query and returns a list of a simple DTO (data transfer object) which will contain only ID and Name.

The application will get the results from that method and use them to construct the View. In a MVC context, the data returned will be the View Model, that data used by the View to generate the html.

The OOP example you presented is everything but OOP, it's just a mish mash of concepts put together badly.

ORM and Factories are for cases when you actually need them, and this example is way too trivial for that.

The idea with OOP is to design the application like a Lego: multiple, small parts with precise purpose that can be assembled together in bigger components which themselves can be used together to achieve the application purpose.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Mike, I must admit I didn't like the proposed "OO Solution" hence why I was asking about it... but from your perspective the GetUsers() method is on an object, perhaps called "users", and will just return an array with the id/name of each user, rather than an array of objects, each one representing a user? so from your point of view there shouldn't be an object called "user" with methods like "GetName" and "GetHomeAddress" (have added some of these to expand the example). –  Craig Francis Jan 7 '13 at 19:05
    
The GetUsers method is on a repository or a DAO. The method returns just what you want to return. If you want to return more than id and name, have another method which will return that. User means something else depending on the context. There is no just one User class. Each context will have its own concept of User. Here the user is just (Id,Name) –  MikeSW Jan 7 '13 at 20:46
    
Ok, so just to summarise... data access should be done via an interface to the database, possibly an object, as many frameworks (e.g. Cake PHP) do in their MVC style (not that I like the model implementation in Cake PHP, but thats for another day)... and you won't typically have an object that represents the records in the database (e.g. a user object for the user record) as while its a form of abstraction, its not the right one (something I certainly agree on, as the number of db queries in the above example are ridiculous). –  Craig Francis Jan 9 '13 at 10:46
1  
The interface is designed to serve the application needs.If you need some UserInfo (Id,name) a method returns that. If you need a full User, another method returns that.The returned objects don't mirror the database structure, you can store the User anyhow you like. That's why you're using abstractions: to keep things in db optimized for querying, while app get only the things it needs. Persistence Layer implementation is separated from Business Layer implementation, they communicate only via a defined interface. –  MikeSW Jan 9 '13 at 12:04

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