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Under ARC, an out-parameter takes the following form (by default; this is equivalent to NSError **):

- (BOOL)tryWithError:(NSError *__autoreleasing *)err;

From the Transitioning to ARC Release Notes, if we pass the address of a __strong local variable, the compiler will create a temporary variable and generate the following code:

NSError *error; // strong
BOOL ok = [myObject tryWithError:&error];

// translated to

NSError *__strong error;
NSError *__autoreleasing tmp = error;
BOOL ok = [myObject tryWithError:&tmp];
error = tmp;

But if we do it with an instance variable:

@implementation Foo {
    NSError *_error; // strong
}
- (void)bar
{
    [myObject tryWithError:&_error];
}
...

this gives us the error

Passing address of non-local object to __autoreleasing parameter for write-back.

Why is this invalid? Couldn't the compiler just translate such code automatically to this?

- (void)bar
{
    NSError *__autoreleasing tmp = _error;
    [myObject tryWithError:&tmp];
    _error = tmp;
}

After all, this is what I will be writing anyway to solve the problem!

Note: adding the out keyword to the parameter type will reduce the compiler's work slightly because it doesn't have to read the current value into the temporary variable — but this doesn't take care of the error.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A pointer to an ivar can't be passed to an “id __autoreleasing *” argument under ARC because that kind of pass-by-writeback is ill-formed. The respective section in the ARC specification lists legal forms of pass-by-writeback, the only one applicable here is

&var, where var is a scalar variable of automatic storage duration with retainable object

, so only automatic storage duration (a local variable) is allowed.

Why this is invalid: I am pretty sure the reason here is compatibility with older code:

1) You should only look at the error writeback in the failure case. In the success case, there is no guarantee at all what's inside the error pointer.

2) In general, whether the writeback value should be used or not depends on the contract of the method. That is something the compiler cannot check.

This is the version of the code that matches the type of &error (NSError * __autoreleasing *) to the type of the writeback (NSError ** which is interpreted as NSError * __autoreleasing *). If ok is YES, the error value won't be touched.

NSError * __autoreleasing error;
BOOL OK = [myObject performOperationWithError:&error];
if (!OK) {
    // use error
}

However, those __autoreleasing are ugly, so instead of forcing us to use __autoreleasing all over the place, the compiler allows us to pass a __strong (but local) variable as well (default ownership):

NSError *error;
BOOL OK = [myObject performOperationWithError:&error];
if (!OK) {
    // use error
}

According to the docs, that gets rewritten to:

NSError * __strong error;
NSError * __autoreleasing tmp = error;
BOOL OK = [myObject performOperationWithError:&tmp];
error = tmp;
if (!OK) {
    // use error
}

Not a problem at all, the error will only be used in the success case.

Now let's have a look at a __strong instance variable _error. Why doesn't the compiler allow that? Here is what the rewrite would look like:

NSError * __autoreleasing tmp = _error;
BOOL OK = [myObject performOperationWithError:&tmp];
_error = tmp;
if (!OK) {
    // use error
}

The problem here is that the writeback in tmp would always be used (assigned to the instance variable _error), ignoring the contract of the method that the writeback should only be used in error cases (or in general whatever the documentation of the method says). A safe way to assign the last error to an instance variable would be

NSError * __autoreleasing tmp = _error;
BOOL OK = [myObject performOperationWithError:&tmp];
if (!OK) {
    _error = tmp; 
    // use error
} else {
    _error = nil; // Make sure that _error is nil if there was no error.
}

And that's only true for the convention of Cocoa's methods which return an error. In general there is no way for the compiler to tell what a method will do with an id *: There may be old methods out there that use different conventions. So if you really want to store the writeback in a __strong instance variable, you currently have to walk the extra mile yourself, and I don't expect this to change.

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"You can't do it because it's forbidden" doesn't explain much of the why :/ –  Norswap Dec 10 '13 at 9:18
    
@Norswap I added a bit more info on that, hope that helps better. –  Tammo Freese Dec 11 '13 at 8:42
    
Thanks a lot! But what I don't understand is this: if it's okay to pass a strong local variable to a * __autoreleasing * parameter, why isn't it okay to pass a strong instance variable? The "Transitioning to ARC Release Notes" document (in the section "Variable Qualifiers") explains what happens when passing a strong local variable. I don't get why the same logic couldn't be applied to strong instance variables. –  Norswap Dec 11 '13 at 19:34
    
A __strong local variable is on the stack and short-lived. If a method writes a pointer to an autoreleased object to such a local variable via writeback, code optimizations prevent retain/release on the object. retain/release is not needed since the object pointed to is in the autorelease pool, so it will live longer than the stack frame. That said, without optimization, you can construct cases where the second code snippet in my answer leads to a crash when calling a badly implemented MRR method, while the first works fine. –  Tammo Freese Dec 11 '13 at 19:59
    
As per the document I mentionned earlier, your second snippet is entirely valid under ARC, optimizations or not. I now understand why it poses problems with MRR though. I don't understand why, in the case of an ivar, ARC couldn't generate the same code it does for a local variable (see the document). –  Norswap Dec 12 '13 at 9:58

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