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Frankly I am very far from being a generics guru and I have to refactor some code. I have three subclasses: class D, class R, and class S. Each of these classes extend class AbstractA. The goal of the subclasses are quite similar, each has somehow similar code in method m(). So I thought it wouldn´t be bad if I could extract method m() from the subclasses and replace it one level up,(into class AbstractA).

However there is some difference:

Class D works with:

Map<String, Map<BigInteger, BigInteger>> counts = new HashMap<String, Map<BigInteger,BigInteger>>();
Map<String, Map<BigDecimal, Set<BigInteger>>> sums = new HashMap<String, Map<BigDecimal, Set<BigInteger>>>();

class R works with:

Map<String, Map<String, BigInteger>> counts = new HashMap<String, Map<String,BigInteger>>();
Map<String, Map<BigDecimal, Set<String>>> sums = new HashMap<String, Map<BigDecimal, Set<String>>>();

and class S works with:

Map<String, Map<BigInteger, BigInteger>> counts = new HashMap<String, Map<BigInteger,BigInteger>>();
Map<String, Map<BigDecimal, BigInteger>> sums = new HashMap<String, Map<BigDecimal, BigInteger>>();

Any hint is welcome regarding the possible modifications of the above mentioned generics, which can result a more "generic" version.(which can be moved to class AbstractA and still can be used by the three subclasses.)

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Not sure how you can reconcile String with BitInteger... –  assylias Jan 7 '13 at 12:50
    
Maybe a String like 473894790327849328490829042, which can be converted to BigInteger ? –  luiges90 Jan 7 '13 at 12:51
2  
It will be easier to think about this if you show the code for the three implementations of m() that you want to replace. –  Don Roby Jan 7 '13 at 12:54
    
Keep in mind that if someone wants to add a class Q which has a completely different version of m() this solution would become quite a pain for other programmers. –  Floris Velleman Jan 7 '13 at 12:55
    
@luiges90 I suppose so, but that possibly means that one implementation does some parsing while the other doesn't. This can't be solved with generics only. –  assylias Jan 7 '13 at 12:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
 class AbstractA<T,U> {
    Map<String, Map<T, BigInteger>> counts = new HashMap<String, Map<T,BigInteger>>();
    Map<String, Map<BigDecimal, U>> sums = new HashMap<String, Map<BigDecimal, U>>();
 }
 class AbstractB<T> extends AbstractA<T, Set<T>> {
 }
 class D extends AbstractB<BigInteger> {
 }
 class R extends AbstractB<String> {
 }
 class S extends AbstractA<BigInteger, BigInteger> {
 }
share|improve this answer

You only need two generic parameters:

public abstract class AbstractA<K, V> {
    private Map<String, Map<K, BigInteger>> counts = new HashMap<String, Map<K, BigInteger>>();
    private Map<String, Map<BigDecimal, V>> sums = new HashMap<String, Map<BigDecimal, V>>();

    public void m() {
    }
}


public class D extends AbstractA<BigInteger, Set<BigInteger>> {
}

public class R extends AbstractA<String, Set<String>> {
}

public class S extends AbstractA<BigInteger, BigInteger> {
}
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The first thing you need to do is create some commonality between String and BigInteger . My recommendation is to create a new class that is composed of these two types:

public class Special  
{  
    private String string;  
    private BigInteger bigInt;  
    ...
}  

Now you can change the parameters of your Map like so:

Map<String, Map<Special, BigInteger> ...  

Now you can leave the invocation in each subclass and mark the m function in AbstractA as either abstract or provide an implementation that can be overridden.

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I assume I did something wrong? –  Woot4Moo Jan 7 '13 at 13:01

What about the following implementation?

public abstract class AbstractA<K1, V1, K2, V2> {

    protected Map<String, Map<K1, V1>> counts;
    protected Map<String, Map<K2, V2>> sums;

    public void m() {
        // your factorized code using counts and sums
    }

}

public class D extends AbstractA<BigInteger, BigInteger, BigDecimal, Set<BigInteger>> {

    public D() {
        counts = new HashMap<String, Map<BigInteger, BigInteger>>();
        sums = new HashMap<String, Map<BigDecimal, Set<BigInteger>>>();
    }

}

public class R extends AbstractA<String, BigInteger, BigDecimal, Set<String>> {

    public R() {
        counts = new HashMap<String, Map<String, BigInteger>>();
        sums = new HashMap<String, Map<BigDecimal, Set<String>>>();
    }

}

public class S extends AbstractA<BigInteger, BigInteger, BigDecimal, BigInteger> {

    public S() {
        counts = new HashMap<String, Map<BigInteger, BigInteger>>();
        sums = new HashMap<String, Map<BigDecimal, BigInteger>>();
    }

}
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